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Thread: climbing Rose

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Tex .. near Dallas
    Posts
    280

    climbing Rose

    Have been offered a nice climbing rose ... it hasn't been trained and almost all of the canes are vertical.

    Can I get it now ... or should I wait until later?

    How should I go about training this to a brick wall?

    Any suggestions as to what to use to secure it to the brick wall?

    Thanks,

    Jim

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Zone 9a - Gulf Coast
    Posts
    9,934

    Climbing Rose Canes

    Jim,

    There are many different types of climbing roses. Some have extremely long canes and are vigorous climbers, and some are more mannerly.

    I have been known to use a heavy monofilament fishing line attached to a hook (hanging basket type) which I placed under the eave of the house. No matter how heavy this line is, the sun will eventuall degrade the material, and it will have to be replaced every few years.

    My climbing peace is planted in front of a lattice structure built as a screen for our pump house. I planted the rose bush on the east post, then as the canes formed, I bent them down pointing them toward the west. The bent canes produce blooming roses all along the cane in the spring.

    I have climbing roses along my chain link fence, and treat them the same as the climbing peace.

    In regards to digging up an established rose, I would wait until after the first frost if you can. Most roses are still growing vigorously in the south, and mine bloom best in spring and fall.

    Unless the rose is completely dormant (no leaves), you will want to cut back the canes. Even if they are completely dormant, you will probably lose some canes anyway. In the process of digging, you will lose some the the existing root structure. The roots that remain on the plant will not be able to support really long canes, but the decision of pruning is up to you.

    If you prune, be sure to prune just above a bud that is pointing in the direction that you want a new cane to grow. Buds are usually found at the base of leaf stems (or where there was once a leaf stem) and will grow in the same direction as the leaf stem. Knowing this will make it easier for you to train your rose.

    Don't forget that roses need good air circulation, so be sure to prune if the canes are too close to one another.

    Do you know the name of this rose?
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Ky zone 6
    Posts
    66
    Jimtx
    This is something I learned at Master Gardeners, I's really for largs shrubs and Trees but I'm sure that it will work on everything. A few weeks before you dig it up, go a ft. back from where you would actually dig and stick a shovel in the ground once on all four sides this brakes the roots and makes them grow thicker. It is called root pruning. I have never tried it but it sounds good.

    Pat
    Log Cabin Pat

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Tex .. near Dallas
    Posts
    280

    climbing rose

    will give it a try ....... I understand "roots" .. the new bed I am 'trying' to dig has lots of them ... but am gaining on them.

    Jim

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