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Thread: Pictures of 'Some' of My Passion Flower Blooms

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Zone 9a - Gulf Coast
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    9,934

    Pictures of 'Some' of My Passion Flower Blooms

    Hi, everyone!

    I have created a web page which contains pictures of my passion flower blooms. Take a look, and you will quickly find out why I am 'hooked' on these vines.

    Click on the link below:

    http://www.landspro.com/page930.htm

    Let me know what you think...
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Tex .. near Dallas
    Posts
    280

    Not bad pictures ...

    great pictures

    They are beautiful ... how about some information on them .... how difficult are they to grow. Are they hardy in Texas? Can they stand our heat and dryness?

    Thanks,

    Jim

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Zone 9a - Gulf Coast
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    9,934

    Easy to Grow

    Jim,

    They are all very easy to grow. Some are considered house plants up north. Mine will stay in the ground once they are established well enough.

    When they are well rooted, they do not need much care. Some varieties are more hardy than others. The Incarnata is hardy to Zone 5 as long as it is well mulched. Incarnata is native to the Southeast.

    The one described as my first is the one that had suckers popping up all over as far as 8-10 feet from the base of the plant and is the one I used for an example on the vine transplant section of the web site. We had numerous hard freezes of about 24 degrees and the red one and my first one survived and came back despite the warnings that they are only hardy to 40-50 degrees, and they were not thickly mulched.

    No matter how hardy they are, I do not chance losing one, so I propagate at least a few and over winter in pots in my garage or house. They do not need a lot of light in the winter, but will continue to bloom and grow if you can put them by a sunny window. I always use soil moist to make sure they do not starve without water, but when planted outside, my first one never drooped or died even during the droughts we had the last few years.

    This is one of the things that I cannot emphasize enough. You have a favorite tender or tropical perennial, you plant it in the ground, it thrives and beautifies your garden, but you want to savor it for next year. Just make some cuttings in late summer and early fall and let them grow indoors until spring and you have them again without having to buy them. Make sense?
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    1

    Talking passion flowers

    Ann,


    They are beautiful. Are they native to where you live. Are they hard to grow. Would North Carolina be a good place to grow these flowers. I have never seen anything like that before. They really are something else. I don't know if they would survive here. Please send me some information on them. Didn't you say on mikes board that you would be selling these vines. What is the best way to grow them. I look on your site to get some more infor. as soon as possible. Keep up the beautiful work.
    Beth W.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
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    Zone 9a - Gulf Coast
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    Descriptions to Come Later

    Beth,

    I will be adding descriptions in the blank space to the left of each as soon as I get a chance.

    As to hardiness, many are not considered hardy here, but seem to be anyway. I don't take a chance though. I take cuttings each fall and get them well rooted before storing them in the garage for the winter in case the parents don't make it.

    My first one and one of the red ones has made it through some really hard and unusual early freezes, so time will tell... Unfortunately, I was unable to prepare them for freezes with heavy mulch, but somehow they survived.

    Incarnata is hardy to Zone 5, but still I would never chance, just in case...

    I can only emphasize that these vines are so easy to propagate (3-4 weeks with enough roots to transplant to a 1 gallon pot) and grow so fast when put in the ground, that I wouldn't hesitate to buy even the most tender ones. They make excellent house plants, but do best when put in the ground in the spring.

    More Later...
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  6. #6

    Pretty, Pretty Flowers

    Hi,

    Those are very pretty flowers. I can surely understand how you got hooked on them. You would think that they even have a lovely smell, r to go with their looks. But I would refrain from smelling!
    We have the Passiflora here. It is a native to Ga, and I saw the flower last year in a wooded ditch, in our neighborhood. I stopped to pick a flower from the vine, and was amazed at it's unique petals.

    I just had to smell the flower. So as I put the car in drive I took in a big sniff, and within 2 seconds, my nose was on FIRE! I called my hubbie on the cell phone and told him, what I had done. He chuckled here and there, and decided to share it with the rest of his office so He put me on speaker phone, the office was in hysterics, for my nose was running, and my eyes were too teary to finish the 1/2 mile drive home. Well, it took about 15 minutes for the tears to stop.
    But the nose was still burning two days later!
    Moral of the story....you can stop to smell the roses but Never stop to smell the Passiflora!

    I'd Like to get a clipping from it, as I do not want to destroy or remove the flower from it's home.
    Are they fairly quick to root?

    Thank you for sharing your pictures with us!
    Kathy in Ga

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Zone 9a - Gulf Coast
    Posts
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    Mine have a Light Fragrance

    Kathy,

    Some of the named varieties that I have do have a very light fragrance. The varieties vary as to how much fragrance, and the fragrance is slightly different in each one. Some I cannot smell at all.

    The blue/purple (my first) that I got from my neighbor is the one that I used as an example in the vine stem cutting section of www.landspro.com. It is also the one that I used in the vine transplant section.

    They should root in 3-4 weeks, but I would wait another month or two before putting it in the ground. You don't have to wait that long, but I prefer to do that.

    Unless you have a mist system, I would only use the semi hardwood stems.
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Louisiana, between BR and NO
    Posts
    61
    Ann,

    What pretty flowers and what timing. Just last night I received three cuttings of what I believe to be incarnata. I got them from my neighbor. Question is-where can I plant them? I have more shade than anything else but have a few places that get 4 hours or so of sun a day. Can they take partial shade? I live in zone 8b in South Louisiana.

    Another thing-the vines my neighbor gave me have these orange worms about 1 to 1 1/4 inch long. She said they are larvae for butterflies. Any thoughts?
    Ray in South Louisiana

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Zone 9a - Gulf Coast
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    9,934

    Partial Shade is Okay

    Welcome Ray!

    They will do fine in partial shade. They are sometimes grown as houseplants and will thrive near a bright window.

    I've never seen any worms on mine, so I guess we will have to take your neighbors word for it.

    Anyone else know anything about these critters?
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Zone 9a - Gulf Coast
    Posts
    9,934

    More Passion Flower Pictures and the Descriptions I Promised

    Hi, Everyone!

    As promised, I have added descriptions of the passion flower vines plus added two more varieties on the page.

    You can see them and read about them on:

    http://www.landspro.com/page930.htm

    Enjoy!
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Middle Tennessee
    Posts
    29

    worms on the vines

    Almost every year the ones I let grow near teh house (these vines are wild in Tennessee( get covered with rusty colored, prickly worms. I swa the worm on a web site the other day but I forgot what it is the larva of. It was some sort of moth. I don't think it was harmful. It eats up the Passon vine tho. So I guess if you see worms, pick them off!
    Kathy P
    SonLight Farm

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