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Thread: Choosing SOAKER HOSES

  1. #1
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    Choosing SOAKER HOSES

    Well, it's 105 today and predicted thru the week with no rain. It's been over 100 since June. I am thinking infrastructure now rather than plants. So I am thinking soaker hoses. I know nothing about them but think I need them. Before I choose one that is $6 over one that in $10 (seems they are 50 feet), can anyone provide insight into what to avoid/look for when buying them or are they all pretty much the same in quality ?Thanks !
    "If I keep a green bough in my heart, a singing bird will come"




  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
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    Ah, soaker hose, one of my least favorite items. I've bought many of them, and ended up tossing them in the trash before the season was out.
    1. You cannot hook them together, 75 ft is the max distance that they will deliver water. Beyond that distance, you get zero water. Some folks deliver the water to seperate lengths with a solid hose, and splitters.
    2. You MUST limit the pressure to about 25lbs, else you will get blowouts, and that is the end of the hose.
    3. The watering along the line is not equal, you get really wet spots, and barely damp spots from the same piece of hose.
    4. Quality soaker hose is an oxymoron in my view. I think they should outlaw soaker hoses and landscape fabric.

    Here is a better, and ultimately cheaper way - it's called 'drip irrigation'.
    I have no idea what or how much you have to water, but if you will visit a couple of sites, and read through some of their tutorials, you can design a very simple system that will do a much better job.
    http://www.dripirrigation.com/drip_irrigation_tutorial
    http://www.irrigationdirect.com/expe...ng-your-system.
    A few months ago I presented 2 seperate workshops on drip irrigation while we installed one at a local school.
    At first the design and installation seems a bit complicated, but it's really simple once you get into it.
    Tom W
    Aching Back Farm

  3. #3
    Join Date
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    Wow! Thanks, Tom!



    Cathy, I have never had good luck with the soaker hoses. They tend to start falling apart after a year, then it is picking up bits and pieces.

    Tom,

    After the last few years of droughts, I surely wish that I had an irrigation system. The videos in the links are great, and I have a lot of learning to do.

    The drought seems to be over this summer, but I have already lost too many plants. Even my 10 year old weeping willow died, just suddenly died and didn't come back this spring. It was getting big. Oh, well..

    Thanks, again!
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
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    598
    Hey Ann,
    Glad to see you posting again!
    My time has been devoted every waking hour for the past couple of months trying to recover from tornado damage. Just got the roof replaced last week, and they are finishing up the replacement of our kitchen ceiling today.
    We lost 9 very large, old oak trees in the front yard, and several more smaller ones all around the property. If I could figure out how to post pictures here I'd show you some before, duriing, and after pictures. They are up on facebook. Email me if you have any hints on posting pictures.

    Now, back to irrigation. I have 3 seperate systems.
    In the veg. garden, Ihave drip tape, with 1 gal/hr emitters every foot. If/when I have it to do over, I'll use a solid line that has 1 gal/hour emitters built in.
    In the orchard I have solid 1/2" piping, with emitters punched directly into the pipe, plus 1/4" lines to the side for full coverage. There are distance limits to the pipe, but I overcome that with "T's" for the seperate rows.
    Out front, in an area that has many shrubs, I used solid pipe, with emitters punched directly into the pipe and 1/4" lines off to the side to deliver water to individual plants/flowers. This one is about 100 ft from the water source so I reduce the water pressure at the source, but the filter remains attached to the piping. This way I can just pull a hose down to the filter for watering, and then take it up to mow grass.

    If you have questions about your specific application design, just send me a msg or email.
    Tom W
    Aching Back Farm

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
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    Tom,

    After all these years, you know me! Something had to be pretty bad to keep me from landspro and my plants this long. I'll email you and tell you about it.

    I am much better and amongst the living again, with limitations.

    Give me a chance to view all the videos that are in the links that you provided. I will post questions here.
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  6. #6
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    I just wanted to quickly say thank you and I'll read more on the weekend. Thank you for the voice of experience and willingness to field followup questions. Drip irrigation sounds like the way to go. I knew soaker hoses sounded deceptively 'easy' :-)
    "If I keep a green bough in my heart, a singing bird will come"




  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Central Coast Australia
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    Tom
    Thanks for the link to the irrigation sites with such comprehensive information

    So sorry to hear about all the tornado damage
    Abby

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