+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: Total Lunar Eclipse | 2010 Winter Solstice

Threaded View

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Parker, Colorado (6500')
    Posts
    259

    Total Lunar Eclipse | 2010 Winter Solstice

    Although I love taking photos of my all my plants, I also enjoy night photography. Well the Solstice brought something special for us this year-- the lunar eclipse.

    During shooting, it was 25 knot winds at about 20F-- which equates to a lot of jumping around and stuffing of hands deep into pockets to keep warm and wonder if the shot will actually work while the camera did its thing.

    So here it is...5 hours long, 524 exposures combined to one... the total lunar eclipse of the 2010 Winter Solstice.



    Many photographers choose to take single shots of the eclipse and though I could have done that, I wanted to experience the entire thing and remember how it was... though I didn't see the stars streaming across the sky, I did the photo this way to give the impression of how the event unfolded.

    To say the least, it was spectacular. It was wonderful-- spiritual even.

    Enjoy.

    DR
    Denver Ryan
    Parker, Colorado (6500')

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    791
    There are no words to describe it. Yours are as close as only a few can come. Ryan, I THANK YOU for using your talent to capture the event so beautifully...and especially thank you for sharing it w/us. Your photo looks quite valuable to me.
    Patsy

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Posts
    598
    I can't come up with words to express my thanks for this picture!
    The sky was blocked with clouds here and we did not get even one look at it.
    I do a lot of photography but I cannot imagine the patience and skill level it took to create such a wonderful overall view of this once-in-a-lifetime event.
    If you do not mind revealing the process, I would love to know how you did it.
    Tom W
    Aching Back Farm

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Wichita,Kansas
    Posts
    3,680
    Blog Entries
    2
    Unbelievable ! Superb artistic strategy ! Is the middle section when it turned red/orange ?
    "If I keep a green bough in my heart, a singing bird will come"




  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Parker, Colorado (6500')
    Posts
    259
    Thanks guys-- I'm glad you like it!

    @Dazed_Lily-- yes, in fact this recorded the entire eclipse. The entire exposure was 5 hours long, plus a few more minutes and it began just before the earth's shadow began to creep across the moon and ended after the full moon was once again in full view. The center, darker and more red part is in fact the peak of the eclipse or what I believe they call the Umbria.

    @Tom-- sure I can tell you the process. First you play around with the camera settings. It was difficult to gauge what I might need in terms of aperture and shutter speed because the full moon wasn't only full, but intensely bright that night. I could set up my equipment without the aid of a flashlight! I fired off a few shots at the moon at the full 10MM to figure out what might be a good medium between the over exposed full moon and the dark, red under exposed moon-- turns out a 30 sec shutter speed with 8 f-stop did the trick. Could it have been better? I suppose, but you'd risk blowing out the full moon or under exposing the dark moon. Next I had to consider where the moon would travel. Once set up, the camera could not move from its tripod. I spent the night before studying where the moon traveled the sky and made my best guess as to where it would go that night. As you know, there is always a little luck involved with photography!

    Next I got out my computer-- a laptop- and connected it to my camera. The battery was able to power the camera all 5 hours but the laptop needed a power source so I had to hook it up to the outlet outside my house. I then used some simple software that took the 30 sec exposures continually for the next 5 hours. As it took the shots, the camera would send the file to the computer and the computer would send it wirelessly to my drive inside the house. This allowed me to accumulate the most detailed files I could without filling up my computer or my camera. This set up also allowed me to go inside and warm up when i couldn't stand one more gust of 20F wind!!!

    Thats pretty much it for the capturing part. Not nearly as work intensive as many would think. I set up the camera's settings and positioned it where I believed it would work and it did the rest.

    Once I collected all the files, I used a simple program called "Image Stacker" and used a function in that software that IDed the brightest pixel in the first file, designated that one pixel and then stacked the remaining 523 photos, according to that first pixel, with every single photo. I put my name on it and that was it! Sometimes you need some extra processing such as photoshopping out a stray plane or weird light in someone's house etc but this time, I was completely alone as the photoshoot started at 1130 and ended at 430 the next day!!!

    If you have specific questions let me know. And I hope you try it out!!!!! Night photography is like no other-- it is quiet, it is beautiful and in many ways quite spiritual. If the sky is clear tonight, I plan on photographing Polaris above my house.
    Denver Ryan
    Parker, Colorado (6500')

+ Reply to Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts