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Thread: African Violets

  1. #16
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    Cathy, remember to let us know when you have babies!
    Dave

  2. #17
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    I'll probably propagate my pink with purple picoteed one. 'Anika' has just suprised me with two send ups of flower clusters and it has so relatively few leaves to start with When I post a photo of the other one, you'll see why I say 'relatively'. I almost think I need to separate the other one into two pots.

    Thank goodness for 'Search' on this site. The other one is : 'Laughing Anna' (Semidouble pink/fuchsia fantasy edge. Dark green. Standard (TX Hyb) )
    http://www.landspro.com/forums/showp...73&postcount=1
    "If I keep a green bough in my heart, a singing bird will come"




  3. #18
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    Each AV plant will form a rosette, so you should be able to see each individual plants. If it is only one, then don't divide it. I have one pot with 4 plants all from one leaf. I need to divide them soon too.

    As for the many leaves, you can cut out the old ones. Take a couple from the middle (not too old or too young) and use them for propagation. When you fertilize, use fertilizer like 10-10-10 because the high first number (like 24-8-16) encourages more leaves.
    Dave

  4. #19
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    Cathy,

    I probably use the 'search' feature more than anyone on this site.

    Sometimes, I lose a label on a plant, and I think I know what it is, but I'm not sure. I keep thinking of names and searching until I find the pics.

    I can't wait to hear about your excitement when you first see those babies start to grow.
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  5. #20
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    What is it ?

    I was repotting Anika when I saw this(front left of center in photo) growing half way down inside the pot. Is it a mushroom or a baby African Violet--do they spring up new growth elsewhere in the pot from the roots ? Sorry I couldn't take another better pic as the batteries died right after this shot. The stem has hairs and the top almost looks like a furled av leaf--stems are clear--again -was under the soil. I've extricated and repositioned on top of the soil.
    Attached Images  
    "If I keep a green bough in my heart, a singing bird will come"




  6. #21
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    Off set can generate from farther down on the main "neck" of the mother plant as well as grow at an angle before breaking the surface. This most often occurs after a plant has been re-potted and lower, aged leaves removed and the neck not given opportunity to heal over before being potted. Then there are some varieties that make these stem (or neck) offsets more readily than others due to their parentage and ancestry.

    I am making my decision based on your description more than the image as the image is not very clear (back off a bit!), of course in a few days it will become very evident to you what it really is as the baby expands and grows under better light.



    Enjoy the journey!

    Rebecca
    Nature is trying very hard to make us succeed, but nature does not depend on us. We are not the only experiment.
    - R. Buckminster Fuller

  7. #22
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    Thanks Rebecca. I am leaning towards baby AV. The only weird thing is the flag like 'leaf' at the top because it is browinsh colored. Time will tell. Before I transplanted the plant I noticed the outer stems were drooping. I transplanted, watered from the bottom amd it took forever for the water to get pulled in(it was like some kind of surface tension thing going on). In fact, as much as I dislike top watering I gingerly took the water in the saucer and using a watering can for better aim, watered from the top--lightly. I just now see the outer stems have perked up. I am relieved as one never can be sure if drooping is from too much or too little water. Although this morning, I slipped it out of the pot and pretty much could see it was for the most part dry. I so dislike 'peaty' soil in most growers pots--probably makes ship weight less. I used AV soil when transplanting.
    [PS-Lowes didn't have any AV's due to the cold weather. They had Phals and Dendrobs marked down from $10 to $3.50 but ya know, I am just not an orchid grower--only have 1 left-Sogo Doll--that's why I think I'll pursue AV's.]
    "If I keep a green bough in my heart, a singing bird will come"




  8. #23
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    The "trick" if their is one, to top water AVs is to always use tepid water and try not to splash. If one uses tepid to slightly warm water the leaves will not spot.. If one does regularly water from the bottom one MUST top water at least 1xmo to flush accumulated "salts" from the top of the potting mix or rise fertilizer burn and petiole rot.

    Since my AV are grown in a terrarium all of my watering is from the top, but I do really drench once every few month and then slide the top glass to open so the excess moisture has someplace to go . I do have a very deep gravel layer as well as quite a few porous stones, but a good drying out is still good - just not to the point that the violets wilt.

    "White" growth on offsets will often turn brown, just leave it alone! This happens when this tender growth is make "subterranean" and doesn't have the chlorophyll needed. Sometimes they will develop it, but sometimes they don't, but the tissue still hold moisture and should be allowed to be absorbed back into the roots and redirected to where it can be used along with any nutrients contained in those cells. New growth will make it and be the proper color, unless they are variegated like mine and then I oft get white foliage on the new babies!

    This little "baby" will change a lot in the next 4.5 to 6 weeks, be patient!

    HINT: moist potting mix feels heavier than dry and dry medium will sound "hollow" when the pot is tapped. You can also set the plant on a folded paper towel to check for excess moisture as the towel will wick excess moisture away from the soil. If wilting is caused by excess moisture you need to dry the mix out or re-pot ASAP. Give the newly re-potted plant bottom heat and high humidity but NOT a lot of soil moisture for at least two weeks. Water thoroughly FROM THE TOP, allow the excess to drain away thoroughly and then return to it's warm and humid environment. Ventilate daily.


    Rebecca
    Last edited by Rebecca; 02-13-2010 at 10:09 PM. Reason: Addt'l info.
    Nature is trying very hard to make us succeed, but nature does not depend on us. We are not the only experiment.
    - R. Buckminster Fuller

  9. #24
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    Augh ! I just remembered, reading that, that I forgot to put a layer of 'gravel'--actually Orchid medium(sorta like lava rock) on the bottom of the pot. That's what I did with my other AV. Interesting info. praticularly re the top watering and the paper towel test. Thank you very much!
    "If I keep a green bough in my heart, a singing bird will come"




  10. #25
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    Always happy to help and it helps me too 'cause I get to sift through my mental file cabinet to find some of this stuff! Cleans out the cob webs in my mind! Even if only briefly, very briefly!
    Nature is trying very hard to make us succeed, but nature does not depend on us. We are not the only experiment.
    - R. Buckminster Fuller

  11. #26
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    I have just continued the propagation of leaves sent by Dave. The directions above were great. They are potted now. I did however use rooting hormone(because I have it-otherwise I probably would not have bought it specially). I used perlite. The only question mark is how moist should the perlite be to start with. I dribbled a paper cup over each mini pot but read Dave's other pointer on keep it on the dry side. So I mixed a little more dry perlite in. I'll wait a week and water from the bottom. I am unfamiliar with perlite and its water retention characetristics and what is desirable as the rooting process progresses ?
    "If I keep a green bough in my heart, a singing bird will come"




  12. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dazed_Lily View Post
    I have just continued the propagation of leaves sent by Dave. The directions above were great. They are potted now. I did however use rooting hormone(because I have it-otherwise I probably would not have bought it specially). I used perlite. The only question mark is how moist should the perlite be to start with. I dribbled a paper cup over each mini pot but read Dave's other pointer on keep it on the dry side. So I mixed a little more dry perlite in. I'll wait a week and water from the bottom. I am unfamiliar with perlite and its water retention characetristics and what is desirable as the rooting process progresses ?
    My experience with Perlite is that is doesn't retain moisture, only aides in drainage. You'd be better off mixing it 50/50 with potting mix and keeping the media moist until new growth is well above the soil line - 6 weeks or better. If you don't want to go through the mess put you potted leaves into a tray and keep water in the tray, say 1/2 inch deep to encourage the leaves to strike roots. Also might want to bag the entire set up, but leave it open to provide high humidity and warmth.


    Rebecca
    Nature is trying very hard to make us succeed, but nature does not depend on us. We are not the only experiment.
    - R. Buckminster Fuller

  13. #28
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    Thanks. There is definitely room for experimentation :-) They have been in the perlite for 1 week now and today I am giving them diluted fertilizer(from the pot bottom). The leaves still look OK --I will try to take a photo. I need to show Dave that they are still OK ;-)
    "If I keep a green bough in my heart, a singing bird will come"




  14. #29
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    I didn't notice your posts until now, Cathy. Turned out that I accidentally signed off from Landspro, so when I came to the site it didn't show any new posts and I thought nobody was posting.

    They are pretty tough. I haven't used perlite much myself for seed/leave starting, but I believe they do wick up a little water, just not as much as vermiculite, so for AV it should be perfectly fine. You can just bottom water it every week with dilute fertilizer.

    You said it has been a week. If it reach 2 weeks without dying or wilting, I would say it will be a success.

    PS: If it really doesn't retain much water as Rebecca mentioned, then you can water it 2x a week or keep it in a water tray with some water. I didn't enclose mine with anything. If it has gone through a week without problem, you probably don't need to at this point. At some point I read that most people enclose it in plastic, but when I did that I got mold. I was using vermiculite, however, so there was more moisture.
    Dave

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