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Thread: Stanhopea tigrina, var Glory of Mexico

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
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    Central Coast Australia
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    Stanhopea tigrina, var Glory of Mexico

    There are around 30 species in the genus Stanhopea, and are spectacular epiphytic orchids native to South America.


    Their most unusual feature is that the flowers actually grow downward, and they are also highly prized for their very strong, distinctive fragrance


    This is my first bud about to bloom and I am yet to smell the fragrance but already it is in my patio at the back door.


    The bloom keeps growing - Looks like ballerina legs - Oops! I think it is a boy - so no seeds from this one



    The magic of this bloom opening




    A close up reveals a cathedral window like chamber that looks as if it is made of glass windows


    The open bloom huge - I?ve measured it being over 24 cm across, dark burgundy middle of the flower gradually turning into the lighter and then pure pristine white color on the end of petals.


    The scent is very strong heady vanilla with warm and seductive aura enveloping notes of smooth tonka bean and creamy musk


    Almost looks like a creature from the deep sea

    It actually reminds me of a cuttlefish

    Cuttlefish Look Alikes




    I have another one still in bud so I hope it will be a different variety.
    Abby

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
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    Abby,

    BEAUTIFUL! I once grew a couple of the Gongora species, aka: Bucket Orchids and they were such joy! I sometimes miss not being able to grow Orchids like I used to, but no proper place for them here. I know my small collection of Phalaenopsis will be a lot happier once I can bring them upstairs and get them set upon the new shelves - warmer and higher humidity as well as better lighting!

    Please do show the other Stanho when it blooms! And yes, they DO look like a cuttlefish!


    Rebecca
    Nature is trying very hard to make us succeed, but nature does not depend on us. We are not the only experiment.
    - R. Buckminster Fuller

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
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    SE Michigan (zone 5-6)
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    oooh, it is so cool that they grow upside down. At least the flowers are. I assume the leaves up there belong to the same plant? So the leaves grow normally yet the flowers poke themselves out from the bottom.
    Dave

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Central Coast Australia
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    Dave

    They are new to me as well - this is the first time I've seen mine bloom. You have to make slits in the pot so the blooms can grow down or have a special pot.

    Apparently in London in the Kew Gardens they had them for several years and did not bloom because they did not provide an appropriate pot with holes.
    Abby

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