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Thread: Agave attenuta

  1. #1
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    Agave attenuta






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  2. #2
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    Abby, that is soooo cool . You really have some fun and unusual plants.
    Patsy

  3. #3
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    Yea. How old is it? Does it grow that tall in one year?
    Dave

  4. #4
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    Abby,

    That is one very nice and very BIG Agave! You have grown it well for it to be blooming! I have a few of the smaller growers but I have never seen any of them bloom. At least not yet.

    Here are a couple of mine. The second one may, in fact, be an Aloe, both are very closely related! I have 4 others, including "Queen's Agave" and one very stiff leaved thing with strings off the leaf edges. And I mustn't forget the one with inch long spines on the tips of the leaves - I have to trim the tips off of these as they are very quick to stab you! It's gotten me several times and those spines go deep! And HURT!

    How big is that plant of yours and how tall is the inflorescence? That is just Amazing!


    Rebecca
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    Nature is trying very hard to make us succeed, but nature does not depend on us. We are not the only experiment.
    - R. Buckminster Fuller

  5. #5
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    Agave attenuata

    Just a bit of a background into my garden - the main reason for such a wide variety is that I started it from scratch after I built my house over 15 years ago now. At the time money was a bit short so I collected seeds and cuttings and offsets from my friends as I saw them bloom trying to fit such a wide variety into it in some semblance and order. Being a sloping block most of it had to be gardens as it was unsuitable for lawn. As I wanted blooms the year around the larger garden area increased my scope.

    The Agave attenuata is over 12 years old. I noticed the inflorescence raceme first at the end of April when I was down the front one evening on a snail hunt. It must have already been 6 foot by then.



    So I suppose the inflorescense lasts in different stages for months. I would estimate it to be some 12 foot long. The crown of leaves would be 3 foot across.

    It certainly makes an interesting statement in the landscape.


    It is also fairly prolific in offsets when growing in ground.

    Rebecca with your prickly ones it just might be a good idea to keep them in a pots just in case they are as prolific as their cousin A.attenuata. But I suppose with your climate you have to shelter them in winter anyhow.

  6. #6
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    Thank you, Abby. For me these are awe inspiring. I so very much enjoy and appreciate your sharing them.
    Patsy

  7. #7
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    Abby,

    You're right about keeping my Agaves (and Aloes) as container plants as I doubt any I grow are hardy enough for our oft very brutle winters. It can get as low as -10F and with very little, if any, snow cover, a plant has to be tough. It amazes me that the Prickly Pear Cacti can now only live here but thrive as well!

    Some of the Avage produce offsets quite easily, but others don't seem interested. The most dangerous one I have must feel safe as it is being covered with spines even on the underside of the leaves. No pups from it, but the plant is a double head. I will have to get images of it and the one whose "claws get trimmed".

    Abby, in a way I envy you your ability to grow such a diverse plant collection. Heavens, your native plants alone are so exotic compared to what I and most others in the temperate areas have. I knew the Agave was one of the big ones, could tell by the first image of it. I have actually seen one of these in person at the Missouri Botanical Gardens. They have an impressive collection of arid plants in one of the bio-domes. This Agave's inflourescent had gotten so tall it broke out a glass in the top before they could get up there and remove it. This was/is no small dome either, but a good 20 feet tall. These Agaves can grow their bloom stems so quickly that they can easily jump several feet in heigth overnight! At least these giants can!

    Abby please do show us more of your unusual collection of plants! t is so nice to see something we "top worlders" grow as a house plant being grown in a more natural setting.


    Rebecca
    Nature is trying very hard to make us succeed, but nature does not depend on us. We are not the only experiment.
    - R. Buckminster Fuller

  8. #8
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    Thank you for your kind words but that Agave is the only strange thing growing in the garden. The first time I saw it bloom was last year. Until then
    I had not realised they bloom. The rest of my stuff is very average from my friends to fill up a rather large garden.
    But my endeavour to have some colour the year around I collected a large variety of plants to achieve this. Most of it is regular garden stuff.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by abbyjen View Post
    Thank you for your kind words but that Agave is the only strange thing growing in the garden. The first time I saw it bloom was last year. Until then
    I had not realised they bloom. The rest of my stuff is very average from my friends to fill up a rather large garden.
    But my endeavour to have some colour the year around I collected a large variety of plants to achieve this. Most of it is regular garden stuff.
    Eh Old Mate,

    Ya gotta remember, what is "usual for you may very weill be the "UNusual" for us!



    Rebecca
    Nature is trying very hard to make us succeed, but nature does not depend on us. We are not the only experiment.
    - R. Buckminster Fuller

  10. #10
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    Agree. agree totally I will post all that blooms

  11. #11
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    Oh boy Name:  clapping.gif
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Size:  2.5 KB Oh boy Name:  clapping.gif
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Size:  2.5 KB...Can't wait for more, Abby
    Patsy

  12. #12
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    This bloom sure is long winded

    It is now for 3 months that it has monopolised the garden scape and is just turning the corner. Perhaps it is so slow blooming in the winter months.


    In the background are the buds of a Magnolia tree starting to form, pink Diasma and the yellow colour is the leaves of an apple tree that have not yet shed. An azalea bush on the left is also starting to show.
    Abby

  13. #13
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    Crazy plant!

    Btw, my brother's family just came back from Perth 2 weeks ago. He said it was cold there. Is the winter about over?
    Dave

  14. #14
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    Dave
    July and August are our 2 coldest months and although our nocturnal temp usually does not fall below 5C we do get some black frost damage on occasions. Come on September. and let the spring begin.
    Abby

  15. #15
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    When the agave gets through blooming, the plant will die. Here in Lakeland we have several agave plants used as traffic plantings and when they bloom, after the bloom is through, the plants all die. So they replace them with the pups.
    Daylilies are the Lord's smile, a new one everyday

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