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Thread: Plantaholics Anonymous

  1. #1
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    Thumbs up Plantaholics Anonymous

    Yes Rebecca, I'm definitely swamped with plants and even seeds that I haven't gotten around to planting yet! You know all those varieties of thousands of seeds I got from you 2 1/2 years ago? Yep, them's the ones! There's no way I even made a dent in those! Plus I have rooted some of my own cuttings that are in a rooting box on my patio and more rooted lilac cuttings growing in half wine barrels that I have to dig out and pot up for sale. I know, I should have dug out the lilac bushes in the fall. I've also got to dig up these Euphorbia characias plants that are starting to crowd out their mother. I sold a few of them last year and have 2 more spoken for. The plants are right by my front door, so they get noticed by anyone who comes over. I've found that the mother plant does a much better job on getting her babies to grow than I can from seed. I guess the seeds like to be close to her in the garden, instead of a seed put into a pot.

    Thanks for the advice on not dividing out the daylilies too much. As I repot them, I am going to have to group them by name, alphabetically, because I remember you telling me that I should keep 2 of each one to grow on from, because you probably won't have that same cross later. See, my memory isn't totally gone! LOL

    Oh no, I'm not growing fruit "trees". The veggie and "fruit" seedlings I was talking about, the fruit being Cantaloupe, Honey Dew and Watermelons.

    LOL If you need to figure out what is in your plant "corral", just do a search on this forum for "Rebecca's basement" (I think) and take a look at your pictures! I remember also seeing cactus and succulents.

    Hugs,
    Linda
    __________________
    Linda-So. Oregon, Zones 6/7
    Linda,

    I decided to start a new thread and have quoted your last post here so what I write makes a little sense!

    Daylily seedlings, you are correct in that you should always keep at least one pot for yourself to use as a "mother plant", but only on the really nice ones that seem to like your environment and do well as garden plants. Oh and that seem to sell well! As long as you have room anyway. Each seed from any given cross will produce a totally new, one of a kind hybrid and even with repeating the cross a hundred times, the likelihood of there ever being a duplicate is slim to none.

    I know it wouldn't be easy for you, but you should try to track how the seedlings do and start keeping only the best and very best ones to propagate for re-sale. Ones that don't make the cut you can of course sell the entire clump/pot. This way you won't be selling a bunch of mediocre plants over and over again and will eventually have a nice, albeit small, collection of really nice garden plants to sell from while newer crosses are growing up and developing.

    Seeds (all kinds) do have a time limit that they will remain viable even if kept in the fridge. When germination drops to 50% or less, it's time to scatter them to the wind.

    With the melon seeds, are you buying new seed to grow from or using saved seeds? Saved seeds if from a garden of mixed melons won't come true, so do be aware!

    My "corral" is where I stage all of my perennials and daylilies that are being grown in pots, wouldn't be any cacti out there now, except for the Opunta (Prickly Pear), which are hardy here. One might find Bleeding Heart, Columbine, Iris and such out there though! I do have one very large pot that I sowed Lily (Asiatic) seeds in this fall and I am hoping to see some seedlings come up in the spring.

    Hope to be able to sell all or nearly all of the Hosta and the few sellable daylilies so I can change things around again. The DL seedlings as well as most of the perennials need more sun than they get now and I'm really tired of that blasted Mulberry tree dropping fruit into the potted plants and having to be pulling them out by the thousands! Would just as soon the landlord cut the darned thing down and the Black Walnut that has come up next to it!

    Also need to do something different along the fence that runs the parking area and my patio so there's room for everything that will be going outside come late Spring.

    So much to do, I need to be triplets! And I haven't even tried to select the DL seeds I would like to grow out from 2007 AND 2008 crosses! I did send most of the '07 seeds to Missouri (and elsewhere), but there were a few I kept.

    Bed time!



    Rebecca
    Nature is trying very hard to make us succeed, but nature does not depend on us. We are not the only experiment.
    - R. Buckminster Fuller

  2. #2
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    WHY THANK YOU DEAR LADY! Wow, my own thread to catch up on what I've been up these last 3 1/2 years I've been away from the list!

    Here's what I have been selling each year for my veggie and fruit seedling sales. I must mention that I've only been growing them up to 4" pots, as I run out of room in my greenhouse for anything bigger. I started weeding the floor of my greenhouse, moving 1 gal. pots around (about 400 on the shelves and floor, mostly daylilies) in Feb. and getting my nursery grade thermostat controlled heat mats set up on the shelves. About 15 ft. of heat mats on one side of the shelves. In March I start planting seeds in egg flats, cut to fill 17" square trays. Each tray is the same seeds. When mats are full, hopefully the seeds have grown enough under the plastic covers to be able to move them off the mats so I can get new trays of flats started on them. Before I'm even done planting seeds, the first ones planted are ready to transplant! I finish transplanting the week before Mother's Day and start sales the day before Mother's Day. Sales have gone until mid to end of June. I also set out hostas, Euphorbias and such that I have. Oh yes, here's the list:

    TOMATOES:
    Supersweet 100 Cherry
    Early Girl
    Beefmaster
    Gold Medal - Heirloom, Yellow/streaked red, low acid, sweet
    Roma

    MELONS:
    Cantaloupe - Pride of Wisconsin - Heirloom
    Honey Dew
    Watermelon

    SQUASH:
    Vegetable Spaghetti
    Yellow Straightneck
    Zucchini

    PEPPERS:
    Anaheim Chili
    Habanero
    Jalapeno
    Sweet Bell

    DINOSAUR GOURD PLANTS
    BIRDHOUSE GOURD PLANTS
    SPECKLED SWAN GOURD PLANTS

    I have been purchasing all new seeds every year and new bags of potting soil. I had 7 catalogs to choose from this past year and ordered from 3 of them. As most of the people on this list can imagine, I ordered more than just the produce! That's to be expected, isn't it? I read in one of the organic/heirloom catalogs that the different melons should be planted 1/4 mile from each other in order to come true, if wanting to save seeds for the next year! I don't know that many people around me to ask if I can use their gardens! LOL I couldn't even get my own veggie garden planted until end of June/beginning of July, since I had to wait until a friend could come and till by 25' X 50' garden! Then it was always WAY too much for just me! Because I couldn't find anyone who wanted any, I would take the extra produce out in my way-back yard and leave it for the wildlife. I would go out there every day to check on the diminishing produce, glad that the wildlife were being fed. You know, I mentioned in a reply to Vicki's post, that the first 2 years I had to throw out left-over seedlings, I cried and apologized to each plant before pulling their roots out of the soil and putting them in the compost pile. I felt so bad because they had tried so hard to be lovely enough to sell! I really hated to have to do that! All that time and work I put into it! This year I'm working on the fun stuff!

    Scatter these seeds to the wind?!! Not on my watch! I couldn't do that! I'll still give them a chance in seed starting mix and throw out the ones that don't germinate. Then I'll feel better about throwing it in the compost.

    Oh, okay. Now I know what you mean by your "corral". You have such a big variety of plants for different requirements of light and such! My, oh my, I would go crazy trying to keep track of who needs to be watered regularly, who needs to become dry before watering, who needs fertilizing and what strengths and who doesn't, who needs more or less sun, etc.

    I love your "triplets" comment!!! Yep, it's even more so with those of us who have to do this by ourselves!

    Another time I'll have to tell you about the THOUSANDS of used pots I recently got!!! Heaven, I'm in heaven!!! MERRY CHRISTMAS TO ME!!!

    Hugs,
    Linda
    Linda-So. Oregon, Zones 6/7

  3. #3
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    Linda,

    You're very WELCOME! Seemed the best thing to do!

    Used Pots? Is there any other kind?? I need more 2 and 3 gallon pots, but may have to use what I already have and in the sizes I already have on hand. (Not having my own transportation is a huge hindrance to a lot of the things I need to do.)

    I have to rely on used pots for all of my potting needs and now I have someone saving her surplus cat litter buckets for me! Approximately 3 gallons in size and a nice shape (rectangular) and a very nice size for older seedlings as they are deep. Heavy plastic construction makes them easy to drill holes in for drainage and long life. I leave the handles to make them easier to move around. I also have a few small sized ones I can use for miniature DL or other perennials.

    Linda, I only grow perennials for resale and a very few annuals (Coleus primarily), and most of the "other" perennials are ones I've had to dig up and divided from my own beds. This spring I have at least 3 Siberian Iris (and 2 are seedlings), 1 Tall Bearded Iris, a couple of clumps of Laitris ("Gay Feather"), both purple and white Cone Flowers to dig and pot or dig, divide, pot and replant for myself. Plus all the daylilies that will be shipped out and the ones that are still awaiting being moved into a different bed. Then there's the potted plants (perennials) that need to be moved on to bigger pots.

    My Spring potting.planting will be dictated more by when I get my SSDI hearing and presumed back pay. BUT, after this year I hope to be able to stock pile some of these supplies, especially potting mixes and such that WM only has during the "active growing season". I've also thought about ordering in bulk and having it delivered, but trucking costs would be out of bounds for me.

    I'd also like to get better organized and come up with a much better set up that the land lord would not have an issue with. (He'd just as soon see flat expanses of grass and no trees or plants of any kind!)

    So what "New Items" are you looking at for this coming season?

    I'm adding Hybrid Blackberry Lilies and Candy Lilies (actually the same thing) and have one cross to plant and seeds from a lovely red selfed seedling. Won't see results until 2010, but that's OK! For annuals I have been saving seeds from my "Kong" type plants and from my Sun Coleus and will have a few (very) rooted/potted cuttings to sell. And then there's the Lantana cuttings I've rooted and have growing from the plants that were growing in from of the mental health office. Only 2 colors, but I might be able to take and root cuttings from my "mother" plants to add a little more variety. In the south these are a woody shrub, but here they are treated like and annual. (Not me, of course!)

    More on Lantana and other ideas another time!

    Rebecca
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    Nature is trying very hard to make us succeed, but nature does not depend on us. We are not the only experiment.
    - R. Buckminster Fuller

  4. #4
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    Rebecca;

    I found out about this nursery that went into foreclosure and had been auctioned off. Sure wish I had known that the owner was GIVING AWAY all the plants before leaving! I would have gone over there with my truck in a heartbeat! Anyway, I called the man who bought the place because he wanted to clean the place up by getting rid of everything there. I wanted to buy way more than my pick-up could hold, so I paid the man to load up his enclosed trailer (7' X 14' X 6' high) and bring it all to me. When he opened up the back of the trailer, I couldn't believe all the pots in there!!! All different sizes, but mostly 1 gallon. Hundreds of them are brand new! There are still thousands of pots there that nobody wants! I told him that if no one wants them, before he sells the place, that I would pay him to bring them to me. I'm going back down there with my truck this Friday and a friend is going to bring his truck and trailer and help me get more. I plan on turning my veggie garden into mostly a pot-in-pot set-up. I get gophers in my garden, so this is the best way to do the plants. Then when someone wants to buy a certain plant, I just go over there and pull up the pot. In winter I'll lay down straw and not have to worry about the plants being outside. Come on over and we can go get more pots together! LOL

    Funny you should mention cat litter buckets. 2 years ago my best friend in Calif. mailed my Christmas gifts in a cat litter bucket, thinking none of the gifts would get broken and that I could use the bucket. She sent me another one the next year. I use them to put fertilizer in and not worry about moisture or mice getting into them. This year my neighbor loaned me 3 of them and I planted tomatoes in them, so I could move them into my greenhouse when the weather started cooling off. It extended my tomato season!

    Good luck on your SSDI hearing! It took me 8 years and 2 court dates to get approved for mine!!! I got approved in March '04, got a chunk of back pay, but still haven't received the rest! Thank goodness I get monthly payments, or I wouldn't still be living here!

    I've got a lot of seeds that I have been saving from my own plants that I want to get started. I've got Golden Chain Tree, Aquilegia - Mountain Columbine and I can't think of the others right now. I know the Golden Chain trees will take a few years, but I want to get them started. I also have to get out to my overgrown Spanish Lavendar and take cuttings to put in 2" pots. Each 17" tray will hold 36 of them. Can I use the heat mats at 72 degrees to encourage cuttings to root? That's the temp I use for the seed trays. I should probably soak the seeds before I plant them? Does that help just about all seeds? Inside the house I've got spider plants (varigated and solid dark green that I'll plant in 10" hanging baskets, 2 of each plant in each basket), Golden Pothos for pots and hanging baskets and Christmas Cactus. I'm even considering buying plugs from catalogs I got. There's so many of those I would like to get, but I'm not sure that will happen this year. Oh my, I should turn my garage into a greenhouse!

    Your Lantana and Candy Lily are pretty! I've never tried Lantana. The gophers took all but one of my Candy Lilies, so that probably should be a pot-in-pot plant.

    Linda
    Linda-So. Oregon, Zones 6/7

  5. #5
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    Linda asked: "I also have to get out to my overgrown Spanish Lavender and take cuttings to put in 2" pots. Each 17" tray will hold 36 of them. Can I use the heat mats at 72 degrees to encourage cuttings to root? That's the temp I use for the seed trays. I should probably soak the seeds before I plant them? Does that help just about all seeds?"

    Linda,
    I've not had any luck with lavender cuttings so someone else should address this, however, heat mats should help with rooting any cutting. High moisture levels for the first couple of weeks, at least as well.

    As for soaking seeds before planting, not all actually need to be soaked. Those with hard seed coats will benefit to be sure.The only seeds I routinely soak are Daylily, Morning Glory and others with hard seed coats and big enough to handle!

    Tree seeds should be stratified (cold, moist treatment for a minimum of 6 weeks) and even then it may take up to a year for them (all) to sprout.

    When you do the pot in pot in part of your veggie garden, lay a heavy grade of landscape fabric or black plastic down first as this will help discourse other 'Critters" and insects from getting into the plant pots. Not to mention it will increase the heat (think natural bottom heat). If you can, you might even want to lay rows of wooden pallets to set the pots on, as this aides in drainage. (Thought I had a good shot of my "plant corral" but guess it was lost in the crash). Anyway, this also discourages insects (worms especially) from getting into the plants. Even if you decide not to do pallets, do lay something on the ground for weed control if nothing else.

    As for coming over and getting pots, be right there, as soon as my private jet is out of the repair shop and my pilot is out of jail! LOL!

    Rebecca


    This is Indy Boy guarding the corral. He's using his ambush tactic!
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    Nature is trying very hard to make us succeed, but nature does not depend on us. We are not the only experiment.
    - R. Buckminster Fuller

  6. #6
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    Linda, Good to see you back on line. Thought I would let you know some of the things that I do. I set my pots on the ground on a tarp and have even used an old room sized rug. HAve also used the black weed barrier. None of which have kept pests from crawling into the pots. I like to set all my plants on the ground in winter so the cold air doesn't get all the way around hte bottom and the ground does afford a little more warmth than the air.Mine are mulched natuarally with fallen leaves. If I had it I would use pine needles.
    Don't know if I have any pictures of mine but will attach a couple of shots of Rebecca's that I found. She is so neat.
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    tennessee sue

  7. #7
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    ROFL ! Oh Sue, I saw that photo first before reading and thought 'Dear Heavens, Sue's got a daylily population explosion just like Rebecca', and it is Rebecca's !
    "If I keep a green bough in my heart, a singing bird will come"




  8. #8
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    Cathy, Thanks to Rebecca I must say I also have quite a collection in pots and in the ground. Can't find a picture of mine but I know htat there is a picture somewhere on Landspro from a year or two ago. Shame on you guys for getting me hooked. I am planning on getting most of them in the ground this year. I have a new area open in the garden just needs some mulch and some holes dug.
    tennessee sue

  9. #9
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    Sue,

    Thank you for posting the "good" images of the corral and the adjoining area! It has changed a bit as there are no longer pots on the black trays. I could go take a new shot, but it's -8F out there right now and that's with the sun shinning! (Yep, that is a minus sign!)

    I'll be re-doing the area yet again this coming spring/summer although I am not sure exactly what all I will be doing to it. I do know it is going to be "fenced" in.

    Right now I just hope all the plants make it through this bitter cold period! Only a few leaves, their own foliage and maybe 2" of snow are protecting them. Actually more concerned about the Hosta plants than the Daylilies.

    Mine do sit on those pallets year round,; now if I could just keep the squirrels out of them!


    Rebecca
    Nature is trying very hard to make us succeed, but nature does not depend on us. We are not the only experiment.
    - R. Buckminster Fuller

  10. #10
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    Rebecca, We all know how much I hate the tree rats. It makes me so mad when I have to pull oak and walnut seedlings out of my pots and put the original plant and dirt back in. I have noticed that since I mulched the front bed that the squirrels are planting (hiding) their nuts in the mulch instead of the pots. Now I will be pulling seedlings out of the flower garden. Pesky creatures.
    tennessee sue

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by sue salley View Post
    Rebecca, We all know how much I hate the tree rats. It makes me so mad when I have to pull oak and walnut seedlings out of my pots and put the original plant and dirt back in. I have noticed that since I mulched the front bed that the squirrels are planting (hiding) their nuts in the mulch instead of the pots. Now I will be pulling seedlings out of the flower garden. Pesky creatures.

    Better the flower beds that the flower pots! At least you can chop the buggers out of the beds, well th Oaks at least, and you don't have the "rats" destroying tender roots of the potted plants.

    A couple tons of mulch are close to the top of my "Want List"; not to give the squirrels a better place to hide their nuts so much as to help keep the weeds at bay! (And maybe so I don't have to water so much!)

    Rebecca
    Nature is trying very hard to make us succeed, but nature does not depend on us. We are not the only experiment.
    - R. Buckminster Fuller

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