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Thread: Leaves leaves and more leaves

  1. #1
    Join Date
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    Leaves leaves and more leaves

    That's what I've been doing today. Raking many many leaves. All the more that gets done now, is less I will have to do in the spring.
    I use the tarp method and sure can haul a lot at one time.
    It's very sunshiny but only 43. Still nice to do the work outside.
    Have a great day everyone!!!
    Happy Growing,
    Vicki in West. Mich.

  2. #2
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    Hi Vicki, or anyone, could you tell me more about raking the leaves? If I don't rake them, will it cause any harm to my grass? This is only my 2nd year living in a house. I didn't have to worry about this kind of things in the past.

    And what is the tarp method?
    Dave

  3. #3
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    Dave- I just read in the Garden section of the newspaper that it is OK to mow the leaves(even now) so they mulch the lawn. Also, that you can work them into garden soil should you have an empty bed.

    http://www.kansas.com/living/home_ga...ry/613749.html

    couldn't find a link to mowing the leaves but it's just basically doing that and adding nutrients into the lawn by doing so
    FOUND IT: http://www.kansas.com/179/story/613733.html
    "Trees were extremely healthy this year due to the adequate rain and slightly cooler temperatures, and put on and held more leaves," Bob said. "Just don't put the mower away yet, and mulch-mow these leaves weekly (or as needed) back into the turf. This is much easier than raking and adds to the organic matter content in the soil. Another option is to make compost to improve soils in coming years."
    "If I keep a green bough in my heart, a singing bird will come"




  4. #4
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    Dave,
    If the leaves are too thick and matt down they will choke out some grass. But if you have a place you plan on planting next year they would be good piled up there to choke out unwanted grass and weeds. And thy e do make nice compost or mulch if shredded. I would like to get someone to rake mine over to an area that I have cleaned off but not mulched or planted yet. I hate not being able to do these things for myself any more but if it warms up and dries up some I might try doing a little bit of raking.
    tennessee sue

  5. #5
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    Well earlier in the fall, I did rake and mow a HUGE pile of leaves, and raked them up and put them on the compost piles, and new planting areas for next year.
    But, I have enough leaves for many many places like this! So the rest of the leaves went into the leaf pile. A HUGE place next to my other driveway, on the other side by where, the commercial compost truckloads go when I get them.

    The tarp method, is you spread out a tarp, rake the leaves onto it, grab each side and haul them where you want them to go. Way easier than raking, bagging, and hauling them.

    I have so many leaves if I mowed them, I'd still have a 6"-8" layer across the whole yard, and that would not be good for the little bit of grass I still have left. The leaves (mostly oak) mat down and let little water through to the lawn,
    or flower beds and then sometimes if the plants weren't cut back, they are nothing but a pile of mold, when I remove the leaves in spring. So it works for me to remove them, mow, compost and then use that on the flowerbeds in spring.

    Good thing I got it done, because this morning there is about 2"-3" of lovely white stuff.
    I went out and took some pics, that I'll share with ya all later.
    Happy Growing,
    Vicki in West. Mich.

  6. #6
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    Cathy, I read about that too. I just wondered if I would look too odd to my neighbors if I mow at this time. Well, maybe it is ok.

    Sue, thanks. I don't have that many leaves, just one layer thick and they don't even cover the whole grass area. I mean, you can still see lots of grass then some leaves.

    Vicki, you have LOTS of leaves, 6-7 inches covering the grass??? Wow!
    Dave

  7. #7
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    Fortunately or UNfortunately I have very little leaf fall to have to worry about. The Red Bud trees and a couple of Mulberries and one very small Locust are the only ones actually on my property, a huge Catawba, Maple and more Red Buds and Mulberries are to the north and west of my back yard so most of the leaves fall onto the Daylily beds in the back and what little "lawn" there is has more weeds than grass so you know I don't worry about raking!

    I have been know to raid the neighbor's leaf pile so I can pile leaves around my rose bushes and some of the container plants that winter on the patio.

    The front beds now get a considerable amount of leaves from the Mtn. Ash and the young Red Bud tree and what ever blows in. I consider (most) leaves to be a natural mulch and soil nutrifier an dsince I do not cut back any of my perennials until Spring I really don't have a problem with compaction. Of course I do have one heck of a mess to clean up come Spring, but only the flower beds and not even all of them since I do not remove the natural mulch from the shade beds.

    The only thing I have an issue with is all the leaves that fall into the pond! They have to be screened out in the spring or the water becomes to acidic with the tannins and such the leaves leach out into the water. While the waterlily might not care that much, the goldfish do. Leaves are left in fall and winter for the fish to rest in and sort of hibernate during the winter and to add another layer of protection for the water lily. Spring will tell if all survive this treatment.

    I do agree though that some lawns can accumulate too many leaves which would be unhealthy for the grasses and those would have to be mowed over a couple of times and some even picked up and removed or composted.

    Vicki, you must have a lot of really big, mature trees in your area to have that many leaves! Put someof those chopped up oak leaves on your DL and around any Azaelas or Rhododendruns you have, they'll love it.

    Closing the book,

    Rebecca
    Nature is trying very hard to make us succeed, but nature does not depend on us. We are not the only experiment.
    - R. Buckminster Fuller

  8. #8
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    Re oak leaves and daylilies. I recall a hybridizer from Missouri(give me a minute--I'll search).....Michael Bouman telling me that he incorporates oak leaves into the soil around his daylilies..must work pretty darn well !(http://www.landspro.com/forums/showt...ght=hybridizer)
    "If I keep a green bough in my heart, a singing bird will come"




  9. #9
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    I do use the chopped up oak leaves. Our property is ringed to the west and north with mature oak trees, mostly on the north. 25 right here, but over there across the street is 35 more, and over to the west is even more! So yeah, I do have lots of leaves. Between the leaves, compost, and pine needle mulch, the older flower beds (I call them garden areas, as there really is no 'bed' part to the front gardens), are nice and loose. I've been using the piled up leaves, to chop in the spring and summer for adding to my compost piles.
    I'm lucky to have enough for my needs.

    Happy Growing,
    Vicki in West. Mich.

  10. #10
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    Oak leaves and pine "straw" are both great for daylilies and the latter has double use/value as they can be used in paths and do not break down as quickly as leaves do.

    One thing I would recommend to anyone using either on their DLs on a regular basis and that is to have you soil tested every few years, especially the pH so you don't get it too acidic.

    When I had a car I'd go around and gather pine needles by the bag full to bring them home for my Rhododendrons and if I was really lucky I would also get some oak leaves from one house I always stopped by. Also used the pine straw and branches and the daylilies, unfortunately I couldn't always get enough for all the daylilies so had to use whatever I could get. Hopefully I'll be able to start doing that again next fall.

    Rebecca
    Nature is trying very hard to make us succeed, but nature does not depend on us. We are not the only experiment.
    - R. Buckminster Fuller

  11. #11
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    Its so great to see you posting again Rebecca! You always have alot
    of wisdom to pass along. Thank you bunches my friend.
    Happy Growing,
    Vicki in West. Mich.

  12. #12
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    Vicki and All,

    It's good to be back!



    Rebecca
    Nature is trying very hard to make us succeed, but nature does not depend on us. We are not the only experiment.
    - R. Buckminster Fuller

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