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Thread: How to Garden in a Small Space # 2

  1. #1
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    How to Garden in a Small Space # 2

    "Iris Bog Trough"

    Gardeners look at a pictures of Neomarica Caerulea "Regina" and only wish they could grow them or Flag or Louisiana Iris. NOW you can and in only (3) Three Sq ft, 18x24". Most of your large hardware chain stores (Lowes, Home Depot, Southerlands or Mc Coy's) have small cement mixing troughs. They run about $5 and they also carry a 18x48" trough also.
    Lean the trough on it's side against something besides your leg.
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  2. #2
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    Drill 3, 1/2" holes about 1 1/2" from the bottom on both sides.
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  3. #3
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    Cut a 2 to 3" wide strip of fiberglass screening long enough to cover past the holes 2" on each side. Tape it to the inside of the trough without taping over the holes.
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  4. #4
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    Carefully fill the trough with your favorite soil mix being careful not to get it under the screening so it will keep out the bugs.
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  5. #5
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    Select your "Bog" plants like these Neomarica Caerulea "Regina" and plant them in the trough. Soak the mix and plants until water runs out of the holes and repeat the soaking for the next 2 days so that all of the soil mix is WELL boggy. Then continue to water on the same schedule as your other plants. These troughs can be buried in the ground up to the top and everyone will wonder why your Iris stay so green and healthy while theirs always seems to need water. This particular Iris will grow to 4 feet tall with a 5 feet spread and they are 'Walking Iris' so, 3 this size with the front 2 off set will be all this trough can hold.
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  6. #6
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    None of us ever have enough room so I appreciate all the time you have spent with this idea and the others on small spaces. They are great ideas. Thanks for taking the time.
    tennessee sue

  7. #7
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    Sue --- I will be posting more "How to Garden in a Small Space". My first nursery 'West Fork Nursery, Florist and Landscape Service' (71-77) I had 2 acres in inground narrow row production and 3 Solar Greenhouses (the first in Arkansas), a 14 x 30 foot movable Florist Shop and garage for landscape equipment. I had plenty of room and now I'm stuck with my patio and back yard. I was "schooled" by prof's at Oklahoma State U., U of Arkansas Depts. of Horticulture, Dale Basham ("Basham's Pink" Crepe Myrtle"), Dr. Carl Whitcome, inventor of "Round-Up", Rev. Harwell breeder of Dwarf Magnolia Grandiflora's, and many others.
    I grew over 50,000 crowns of Asparagus in an area 16' x 50' using a new (at the time) type of dirtless soil.

  8. #8
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    John
    I was just looking at the bog trough and was wondering how water chestnuts would grow in this sort of system.

    It is imporant to keep the level of water constant which I assume would be the same for the iris.

    I find with my water chestnut containers all is well until we get continuous rain, but drilling the holes in the trough is just so smart. I am impressed.

  9. #9
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    Many thanks, John!

    I adore the idea of using the fiberglass screening. The biggest problem that I have with my pots is that the soiless mix tends to wash out during heavy rain storms.

    AND I have several of those tubs around here.

    You are simply filled with wonderful ideas!!!!

    Thanks, again!
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  10. #10
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    There are wonderful things about the fiberglass screening. It does not tear but, can be cut. It doesn't rot or rust. It can be taped or stapled or glued in place. It keeps the bugs out, from coming in the holes yet lets water out (and in).
    John

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