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Thread: Clematis Seeds

  1. #1
    Join Date
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    Clematis Seeds

    I have harvested quite a few different varieties of Clematis seeds and Rebecca sent me some that are 'different' than mine. They have been stored in the refrigerator until I have time to not only sow them, but care for the seedlings as well.

    I have researched the internet and found several sites that describe how to grow Clematis from seeds. Since my winters are mild, I plan to sow them outside in pots or would it be better to put them in a small ziploc of moist, sterilized media for a period of time, then pot them up?

    Clematis are not easy to grow here, but somehow, I have managed to grow numerous varieties. The early bloomers are my favorites. They are in bloom when very few other plants are...

    I thought I would try to start a topic on Clematis on the seed forum, then if it picks up to more discussions on Clematis, I can move it to the vines forum.
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  2. #2
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    Ann,

    You know I'm interested (just not gotten around to looking up the info myself). Found out the hard way that they don't do well from cuttings - I don't think any of the cuttings I made last spring evere did anything. So you can't just stick 'em in a pot of medium and keep them moist. they probably have to have heat and a misting system.


    Rebecca
    Nature is trying very hard to make us succeed, but nature does not depend on us. We are not the only experiment.
    - R. Buckminster Fuller

  3. #3
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    I tried several different clematis from seed this year with very little luck. I did finally get some Korean Beauty seeds I bought to sprout. They were in the frig in potting mix for about 4 weeks.
    The lady I bought the Radar Love seedssaid to freeze them (barely covered) for 3 weeks. I didn't and wish I had as they did not come up after being in the frig for 3 weeks.
    I hope the Korean Beauty continue to grow well. We will see.
    tennessee sue

  4. #4
    The best site there is on growing Clematis from seed is (rather appropriately) Clematis from Seed by a friend of mine, Brian Collingwood. I will say this from experience though - don't give up too early! Some of the larger seed produced by the Large Flowered Hybrids and the C. viticella (late flowering) types take up to a year or more to germinate. So don't throw those pots away too soon!

    Cheers,
    Shannan

  5. #5
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    Shannon!

    I have been to that site several times over the years. It has grown and gotten even better since I last visited it.

    I definitely MUST give this a try. Most of my seeds have already been harvested. I miss many of the seeds because they ripen and fall off during heavy rains before I spot them. I wouldn't be surprised to see some seedling popping up. Hopefully, the photos of the seedlings will prevent my plucking a seedling (thinking it is a weed).

    Thanks! That is a GREAT clematis site! Your friend has certainly put a lot of work into it....
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  6. #6
    Ann, I will pass your comments on to Brian - he will be pleased. He has put many years of work into the information on the site, and the last year or so, re-organising it so that it is easier to use.

    Clematis are great fun to grow from seed - but watch out, hybridising them is not as straightforward as daylilies - though probably a bit more exciting as not many people seem to make purposeful crosses with Clematis. They tend to just collect seed that was open pollinated and grow that one an select from the seedlings. So the field is wide open for some great new intros!

    Good luck with your seed!

    Cheers,
    Shannan

  7. #7
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    Yes indeed, one fantastic CLematis site! I'd like to ask Brian about winter sowing the seeds in containers outside. That's going to be how I will have to grow any seeds I decide to collect this fall. 'Polish Spirit' is full of seeds as usual and 'Cardinal Rouge' has a few. I haven't really checked the others. 'Snow Queen' appeared to have died on me after it bloomed, but it has come back strong and doing well, but needs to be out of that pot and in the ground in much better light! 'Lilac Wonder', still potted, but growing up into one of the small Red Bud Trees nicely, it's probably rooted through the pot's drainage holes. Fine with me, will just have to mound lots of mulch around the pot this winter.

    Still trying to figure out how to replace the arbor that 'Nelly Mosier' and PS are on that the near tornado blew down earlier this summer. I have it propped up for now. Though about using the framed springs from bunk beds, but don't have any! Three of them would make an awesome looking arbor though and be sturdy enough to support good old PS!

    So much needs to be done and here I have no way of doing any of it.

    Turned over the area I plan on using for the miniature Daylilies, but the soil is like concrete and won't break down into smaller clods. Need to get a tiller on it.

    Several trees either in my yard or bordering on it need to have a chain saw used on them as well as a couple of shrubs that have gotten way too big. Have the use of the chain saw, just need an opperator now!


    If anyone whats seed from 'Polish Spirit' Clematis, just holler! Be happy to save and send y'all some to play with. Just remember, this one grows like a weed and gets huge!


    Rebecca
    Nature is trying very hard to make us succeed, but nature does not depend on us. We are not the only experiment.
    - R. Buckminster Fuller

  8. #8
    Rebecca, Clematis seed is always better the fresher it is. So if you harvest seed this Autumn, pot it up as soon as you can. You may not see signs of germination until Spring, but you'll get better results than if you wait until Spring to sow it.

    I know what you mean about having too many things that you just can't do yourself. I've also got a tree that borders my property that has grown out and over and is now touching the roof of the house which needs a serious cutting back (may have to 'borrow' my neighbor AND his chainsaw and hedge cutters - got about 100 feet of hedge to do too!) - and I'm still trying to figure out how to move a peony without disturbing it too much. (What for, you ask?! Well to make another daylily bed, of course! This time for Ra Hansen intros.)

    Cheers,
    Shannan

  9. #9
    Join Date
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    oh!

    All of that sounds so very familiar. If I didn't have to worry about the privets growing on my side of the neighbor's fences, life would be a lot easier.

    I'm not much of a 'pruner'. I don't like to prune, unless I am taking cuttings. So, I plant things that can grow nicely in natural form with ocassional snips for branching.


    We have a 3 day weekend, and yes, I still have some catching up to do with grading papers, etc., but my plans are to spend some time in the garden.

    I will sow some of the fresh clematis seeds now. Some, I have already put in the fridge. They bloom early here and do produce a lot of seeds, so I have harvested quite a few that went into the fridge before reading this.

    Those that I sow now will spend the winter outside. If they sprout, they do and if they don't, they don't.

    I have a clematis blooming now, but the blooms are small. The vines are so entwined into each other that it is hard to tell which one it is, but the blooms are a dark purplish color. Very pretty!

    Don't mind me! I'm still in awe that they do so well in my climate.
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  10. #10
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    Heck ! I'm just in awe that my $1 clematises from Wal-Mart are still alive and growing ! Seed germination isn't even in the realm of my expectations at this point. I have the President(2) and a white one(sorry I keep forgetting the name ; it's dark out and I can't look). Now here is something that I have noticed. They are in pots in a plastic bin with no drainage holes. Consequently water has pooled in it. I think that they actually like that. Go figure !
    "If I keep a green bough in my heart, a singing bird will come"




  11. #11
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    Cathy,

    I have also noticed that they like it when it rains a lot here. During the drought, they pouted and leaves turned yellow and dropped. When it started raining, new growth formed and the look happy.

    I was like you when I first started growing them. They were mostly cuttings that I babied and was in awe when they eventually (it too forever) rooted.

    All of mine are in pots. They seem to like it in pots, but they are stilll young and at some time I need to prepapre a permanent bed for them so their roots can dig deep down.

    Even when they were little, they produced seeds. Those went in the fridge, and they are still there. Shame on me.... But time is always short around here.

    We'll see what happens with the refrigerated ones and the ones just harvested.

    If you have never grown clematis, I encourage it. They are easy and very forgiving. Roots in the shade with filtered sun in our heat, and they bloom like crazy. I fell in love with them right away!
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  12. #12
    Cathy and Ann,

    Yes. Clematis like loads of water. Some people even think that the adage 'feet in the shade, heads in the sun' is actually because shady places tend to stay moist - nothing to do with the sun at all. When it is warm, I'll give my Clematis each a gallon or two of water every day. The only one that I know of that likes it a bit more on the dry side is C. cirrhosa - its an evergreen type which flowers in January.

    'The President' is an outstanding performer. I would also highly recommend any of the later flowering kind, these types are less prone to clematis wilt which affects mostly the early large flowered hybrids. Its a genetic weakness that the later flowering types don't have because of the different species they come from.

    Ann, because of your climate, some of the New Zealand type clematis would probably do well for you. They have smaller flowers, but they absolutely cover the plant. They are also fairly easy to grow from seed.

    We are spoilt for choice on Clematis here in the UK (the opposite of daylilies!) and there are over 1000 types listed as available here in the RHS Plant Finder. Now why did I choose to bang my head on the wall with daylilies?!

    Cheers,
    Shannan

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
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    Union City CA 94587 --9A
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    For collecting seeds - when petals start to fade or fall - cut the toe out of an old nylon stocking and put over flower head . tie or tape closed - shake every day or so . when you see seeds cut the flower , let it dry a day or so shake again . either label nylon or remove seeds and plant .

  14. #14
    Good tip, Roy. I have often found that by the time seeds have ripened, many have been blow away by the wind.

    Thanks for idea.

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