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Thread: Cacti and Succulent Garden

  1. #1
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    Cacti and Succulent Garden

    This type of garden is a natural for dry, sunny Central Texas but I also had a cacti & succulent garden in raised beds in soggy Houston. I had fun putting this one together with the plants I brought from Houston in January and it is coming along very well.
    It is the centerpiece of my back yard gardens.
    Attached Images  
    Last edited by txbeyer; 07-27-2006 at 09:28 PM.
    Bob Beyer
    Austin TX, Zone 8b/9a

  2. #2
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    I love the look: The circular presentation on raised stones gives the appearance that the whole thing is itself a large version of a dish garden and it does contain 'regular' sized dish gardens as well. Very unique !
    "If I keep a green bough in my heart, a singing bird will come"




  3. #3
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    Aug 2001
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    Zone 9a - Gulf Coast
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    That stone wall makes a fantastic backdrop for your cactus garden.

    I have to tell you that the years that I worked in Texas, I became addicted to cactii. I grew them from seed and every which way I could.

    For years, I have planned a circular, sand garden of succulent plants, but when my precious Hunter came so suddenly and unexpectantly into my life, the thorny varieties were abandoned. He is far to curious and likes to decorate my plant treasures.

    Still, I would love to construct such a garden and decorate it with seashells, sand dollars, sea horses and all the marvels that I grew up with during my childhood years.

    I'd also love to have a bog garden and grow those plants that grew near the home of my childhood...
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  4. #4
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    Saphora secundiflora "silver peso'

    On the subject of xeriphytic plants and knowing my desire to have plants that are unusual or different from the more common varieties, I saw a TX Mountain Laurel (Saphora secundifolia) that was entirely and thickly pubescent with gray fuzz. The variety is called Silver Peso. I couldn't afford the high price the nursery wanted for it but they let me take a seed pod (which was also pubescent). Not knowing weather the pubescence would come true from seed, they germinated quickly and are showing the grey fuzzy pubescence. Growing a TX Mountain Laurel from seed is going to take time as this is a slow growing plant, but I will pamper them along. Attached a picture of this plants unique foliage. Like the regular species, it produces that wonderful bloom cluster that smells like grape kool aid.
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    Last edited by txbeyer; 07-28-2006 at 08:25 PM.
    Bob Beyer
    Austin TX, Zone 8b/9a

  5. #5
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    Western Michigan near Muskegon
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    That is a wonderful looking garden you have Bob.
    What is the round cacti? I had one like that my cousin
    brought me Arizona. May I share your picture with another friend of mine?
    Happy Growing,
    Vicki in West. Mich.

  6. #6
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    Vicki, It is Echinocactus grusonii - commonly called the golden barrel cactus. Of course you are welcome to share any pictures I post. I enjoy sharing them.
    Bob Beyer
    Austin TX, Zone 8b/9a

  7. #7
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    Bob. I love the claudiforms but of course we can only grow them as house plants (same for most cacti and succulents).
    Is that a desert rose I see in bloom? I had 2 at one time but they are no longer with me. They are so pretty and unusual form.
    It is so interesting to see gardens from different climates. Keep the pictures coming.
    tennessee sue

  8. #8
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    I live in zone 6b. The attached link is for a Xeriscape Nursery and they have a 'search' function. I input only the Plants=Cacti& Succulents and my Zone=6b and got 63 items. Can someone check this out(input as I did) and tell me if the items that result really could grow in zone 6b ?

    http://www.highcountrygardens.com/finder.html

    for example: http://www.highcountrygardens.com/46590.html
    Last edited by Dazed_Lily; 07-30-2006 at 09:35 AM.
    "If I keep a green bough in my heart, a singing bird will come"




  9. #9
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    Cathy, I tried the site with zone 6b (my zone also) and put Southeast region and came up with 4 matches none of which were familiar to me. They didn't look like they would grow here.
    About all we can grow are Delosperma (ice plant), yucca, several sedums. Prickly Pear grows well here and a cactus I bought as Tennessee Walking Stick. I doubt that is its real name. I no longewr have this one (it is at the farm).
    Check with your Extension Agent. He might be able to help with what would grow for you. You could plant what is hardy and plant pots of the others that could be brought in before frost. A sandy raised bed would make this easy to do.
    tennessee sue

  10. #10
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    Thanks Sue...good ideas there ! About all I've seen hereis yucca and I do have prickly pear. The PP overwinters in two clay pots and I tryto make sure it is in sun as it overwinters. I like the idea of a raised sandy bed and being able to bring them in.
    "If I keep a green bough in my heart, a singing bird will come"




  11. #11
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    Austin, Texas
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    Regarding the succulents I grow that are shown in the picture I posted, many of them are not hardy here in zone 8b and I dig, pot and place them in the GH for our shorter winter period here, e.g. desert rose, certain tropical agave. euphorbias, dwarf plumeria,and caudiforms. Some are totally hardy (yep, in the yucca group primarily), and I throw a blanket over the others and they come through often with some damage that heals quickly in spring, so don't get the impression that everything I have planted in that photo stays there yearround. One of the real advantages of having a hobby greenhouse is the ability to recreate such a garden every year by protecting many of the plants that would not make it in-situ.
    Last edited by txbeyer; 07-30-2006 at 06:39 PM.
    Bob Beyer
    Austin TX, Zone 8b/9a

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