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Thread: Let's get this topic going

  1. #1
    Join Date
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    Let's get this topic going

    I notice that 80 percent or better of the posts are the daylily people and other topics on Landspro have little activity. I'd like to see this topic more active and know that many of you must grow plants in this category. I would assume this includes any tropical or tropical looking plants from Zones 9 or higher that are either grown in the ground for summer display or in containters in colder climates, What subtropicals are you growing? Among my favorites include Calliandra, Natal Plum, Orange Jessmine, Dwarf and ornamental bananas, small citrus, Ixora, Bromeliads, succulents of all kinds, Duranta, Acalypha, Gingers, Monstera, small palms and cycads, just to name a few. Even in Austin, I depend on my hobby greenhouse to overwinter most of these plants from December through April. Tropicals and subtropicals can add to the variety of textures, and colorful plants in the summer garden. In central and coastal Texas, we can grow many more plants in this category than folks further north, but I'm sure many of you are indulging in a few tropical and subtropical plants.
    Bob Beyer
    Austin TX, Zone 8b/9a

  2. #2
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    Bob,

    It's good to see you trying to generate some interests here. YUP! The daylily and Hippeastrum forum have been rather active the last few months, but not much of anything else.

    Right now, I am trying to focus on subtropicals that will survive my winters semi-protected if protected at all. I left some blue Plumbago outside in a pot. It survived on the north side of the house in a pot, so it needs to try surviving in the garden.

    The variegated spiral ginger is doing 'okay', but not great. It is now under the new porch area and protected somewhat during the winter, but I don't think it gets enough sun or moisture. It's in the ground, not in a pot.

    My bromeliads are in hanging pots which make it easier to bring them inside for the winter. Unfortunately, I am missing a lot of shade due to lost trees so we will have to figure out what to do about that. I may have to build a shade house of sorts for the summers.

    My other gingers are doing just fine. Most survived outside in pots, so they will definitely go in the gardens as soon as the ground gets some rain.

    I also have some houseplants that I decided to try outside, and believe it or not, they made it. It was a mild winter, but they were on the north (coldest) side of the house and in pots, so they need to be planted in the gardens as well.

    My epi's are growing quite well, but the only one that has bloomed as been the white, night blooming kind. I'm anxious to see some of the others bloom.

    Bob, please do invite your Gulf Breeze friends to spend time at Landspro until Mike has time to get the Gulf Breeze forum going again.

    Thanks!
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  3. #3
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    Color and Subtropicals

    I have been watching this color combination for a few days. I suppose this is an advantage to having some plants in pots. You can move them around and see how the color combinations and textures look when you arrange them in different ways.

    This one wasn't planned. It sort of happened that way, but I like it. It's a black elephant ear that I bought at a huge discount because it was almost DEAD. I placed the pot near some crocosmia. The elephant ear is recouping quite nicely, and I guess that even drought doesn't kill orange/yellow crocosmia.

    Take a peak....
    Attached Images  
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  4. #4
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    Like I said, having things in a pot can let you visualize combinations.

    I picked up one of my pots of variegated Peruvian Daffodials and moved it to see how it would look next to the black elephant ears. I do like the contrast, so I just need to do some cultural requirements analysis.

    Anyway, another peak....
    Attached Images  
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  5. #5
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    Another plant that could be permanently planted in the same area, only in the background, in more shade would be Persian Shield. I think that would make for a great combination.

    What do you think?
    Attached Images  
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  6. #6
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    The current location of the Persian Sheild is not quite right, but if I moved it to a little more sun, it would be more purple.

    Now, this is one that may just stay where it is, but get placed in the ground. It is happy and the leaves are huge. The only problem is what if it gets too HUGE! It's in the porch area which is protected during the winter.

    Can you guess?
    Attached Images  
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  7. #7
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    I love the Persian Shield but it is definately a house plant here.
    I bought 2 very small black elephant ears off ebay this spring but they have surprised me with the size of the leaves. I hope the bulbs are also growing.
    Ann, is the night blooming epi you have a cerus. I bought one a few years ago for $2 at a plant sale and it is now huge.I need to move it around front so I don't miss the bloom again this year.
    I am posting a picture of some of my plants that don't winter over here. There is a Madagascar palm both to the left and right of the picture. Not a palm, nor a cactus(although it has fierce thorns), It is a succulent and I love it.
    My epi "Starburst" is in the forground in the white hanging basket. There are several cacti in the mix and more succulents.
    There is a large pencil cactus in the forground with a yellowish tint at the tips.
    The pot on the stand is not a subtropical but interesting. It is a hardy fuschia bush. Supposed to be hardy here (Zone 6b). I got it this spring and will plant it in the ground this fall. It was much larger before the tree fell on it. But it is recovering and starting to bloom again.
    Attached Images  
    tennessee sue

  8. #8
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    On the right end of the step in the terra cotta pot is a miniature jade. I will try to get a picture of my big jade soon.
    You can easily see a couple of amarylis. To the far right is a pot of hens and chicks and dandelions,,what? How embarassing.LOL
    tennessee sue

  9. #9
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    Sue,

    It is a night blooming cereus, and I see two more blooms forming on it right now. I tried to self pollinate the last one, but no seed pod formed. That might have been the fault of the weather.

    The plant with the big leaf is a Bird of Paradise. I don't think it would survive our winters, and I don't plan on trying. I like it where it is! The greenery that you see around it is passifora. I would like to take cuttings of those and try them in the ground. The 'Incense' is defnitely hardy, but I don't know about Lady Marguerite (spell?)

    I can't do very much propagation until we get some direly needed rain. I have too many plants already that need to go in the gardens.

    It has been a 'short', hot and dry summer. I only have another week off from school and a couple of those days are taken by workshops, etc.
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  10. #10
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    Ann, I can't believe it is almost time for you to go back to school.
    Wouldn't you love to stay home longer and work with plants?
    It has been so hot here and dry,too, but not as bad as you have been. I had so much going I didn't have time to set up a place for cuttings and now I am glad since it has been so hot. I will fix a place this fall so I will be ready to go next year. It is really hard to keep up with everything when you work, isn't it?
    Here is a closer picture of my daughter's Madagascar palm. It was just about 4 inches tall when she got it and has outgrown mine by a long shot.
    Attached Images  
    tennessee sue

  11. #11
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    Actually, I looked at the calender again and I have 2 weeks of no firm commitments for working days, but I know that I will be moving into and setting up a new room, spending time at 'Make and Take' to work of materials needed for class activities, wrapping up lesson plans, syllablus, setting up the web site for parents, my grade book activities, etc., etc.

    This year, I want to set up as much as I can before school starts so that the first days of my first few weeks won't be such long ones. That way, when I come up, I can haul the water hose around (LAS!) and start potting and repotting. Surely, the weather will cool down a little and we will start getting some rain.

    First actual teacher work day is Aug. 10, and if there are no weather shutdowns, the last day is May 29, 2007. I am looking forward to this year.

    I am looking forward to the coming year. Can you tell?
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  12. #12
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    Ann,

    Earlier in this thread you posted a picture of the black elephant ear and crocosmia with a comment on the 'contrast'
    I don know if you have ever seen the bloom on the black elephant ear, but it is quite a contrast all by itself. Try to look past the hydrangia.
    Attached Images  
    Tom W
    Aching Back Farm

  13. #13
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    Oh, NEAT!

    Is that a seed pod on the left?
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  14. #14
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    I've never seen Elephant ears bloom. How interesting. I guess it is due to our shorter season.
    Looks kinda like an arum bloom, doesn't it?
    tennessee sue

  15. #15
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    Tom's Response and Picture

    Last night, Tom was the first to write me to let me know that there was a problem with posting on landspro.

    He sent the following email to me:

    "I don't know why but the forum would not let me post this tonight. Maybe you can, ya think?


    I have 4 of them, still in 1 gal pots and they are all blooming. The actual bloom looks a little like an anthurium, or peace lily, but has this large bulge at the base. The flower stems come right out of the leaf stem.

    Once the yellow flower petal fades, it leaves that funny thing that looks like a seed pouch.

    The flower emerges as a yellow bud, but with these black spots all up the back. It remains in that state for just a few days, and then once the single petal opens, is begins to fade and is gone in one day."

    Thanks, Tom! I am attaching his picture now.
    Attached Images  
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


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