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Thread: Underground Bees

  1. #1
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    Underground Bees

    I need a good remedy for underground bees. These are very close to the house. In fact, they are in the garden area right next to my front door. When I was weeding today, I had to stop because I spotted them.

    Any ideas? I can't use any type of smoke or fire because the ground is dry and crisp. No rain in two months makes for a bad situation.

    I am soaking everything near the house because of July 4th. Who knows what fireworks will be going off and where, but there are some areas of my yard that would definitely catch on fire. Remember the year that the boys across the street started a fire with smoke bombs? I do! They were trying to stomp it down with their bare feet, and I was shoo'ing them away with water hose in hand.

    Anyway, I need help. This is one of my planned daylily/amaryllis beds. I don't dare dig or amend or prepare for planting for fear of being stung. The last time I as stung, I passed out. And it hurt something aweful...
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  2. #2
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    Provided the area occupied by these terrestrian bees is not too big I would use hot, almost boiling water. But exactly this is the difficulty, I know.
    How aggresive are these bees

  3. #3
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    Excellent idea!!!

    I have some huge pots that are used for crab boils. It's a southern thing, I guess, so you may not know what that is....

    They are extremely aggressive starting with the first one to attack. My understanding is that they are like fire ants and will signal others once they attack causing the others to swarm and attack.


    It would be easier if I could find their entrance hole. It's under mulch and dead briars. I stopped raking when I spotted the first few to start swarming. I just checked... There are two in the area right now.

    I guess you could say that I am somewhat terrified of them. The last 'bite' hurt for what seemed like forever.

    Bees don't normally bother me. Since I grow flowers, they are all around. I don't bother them. They don't bother me. But... These, are welll... They are different. They attack!
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  4. #4
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    Oh, NO!!!!! I found the bee hive. It is actually above ground, but right on top of the ground. More bees were around this evening. They sure look like yellow jackets to me.

    The boiling water idea sounds good to me, but I think I will wait and observe them for one more day... Just in case there is another hive or something.

    The nest is HUGE!!!! Can you tell that I am afraid of them?

    Yup! I'm a scaredy cat when it comes to these babies. I'd rather be bitten by fire ants! OUCH!

    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  5. #5
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    Ann- I searched on Eliminating Yellow Jackets and Los Angeles county apparently comes out and removes nests and the other link had some wacky 2 person night maneuvers involving a garden hose and kerosene
    They are less active at night and they indicate that that's the time to remove them.
    Personally, I'd call the city or county and ask if they do that or get a private exterminator before I'd mess with it myself.
    Sometimes people only get one chance with bee stings !
    "If I keep a green bough in my heart, a singing bird will come"




  6. #6
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    Cathy,

    They won't come out here unless you pay dearly. These bees are a common problem here.

    The ground bees are shorter and fuzzier looking. The yellow jackets are more slender. Both are vicious, and yes, some people are terribly alergic to them. I will go to the store and buy some Benadryl before attempting anthing.

    Here is a link that I found from our local cooperative extension. If possible, I would rather use insectacidal soap/hot water. There is wasp spray, but it kills every plant in site.

    http://www.aces.edu/pubs/docs/A/ANR-1134/
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  7. #7
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    If these hymenopters are so aggressive it is essential to wear protective clothing.
    Indeed some people who were stinged previously develop an allergic oversensibility, and a single subsequent stitch might result in a live-threatening anaphylactic shock, if no antidot is applied in due time.
    An excellent strategical recommendation is to undertake the combat in that time of the day when the insects are less active.
    Their activity depends strongly on temperature so I would presume that the early morning hours are perfect for this "project".
    Last edited by haweha; 07-03-2006 at 09:08 AM.

  8. #8
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    Yes! Yes!! Yes!!!

    I am terrified of them. I watched them early, early this morning. Cools in the morning are around 74 degrees F. (about 23 degrees C.). YIKES!!!

    They say that these go back into their nest area at night, and unfortunately, you can't use a flashlight or they will come out.

    I'm still pondering. Obviously, I haven't gotten up my nerve yet. And, yes, I seem to have become allergic to more things than when I was younger. (Younger, get that?!??!?! LAS!!! )
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  9. #9
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    Ann, I"ve always heard to get rid of them at night.
    Bee allergies are very serious. You REALLY need to get someone else to take care of this problem for you how ever you decide to treat them. Yellow jackets are very aggressive and have very potent stings. Please enlist someone else to do this for you.
    tennessee sue

  10. #10
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    23°Celsius is, we are both aware of that - simply not effective in order to slow-down these maleficious hexapodes sufficiently...

  11. #11
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    My brother is coming over in about an hour or so. He will take a look at the situation and help me. He is pretty good about that sort of thing...

    I HOPE!!!


    Thanks!
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  12. #12
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    Get this!!!

    My bro suggested that I use an idea that my younger sister found on the internet.

    Cut a 2 liter coke bottle in the middle. Leave some coke in the bottom of the bottle. Invert the top. The bees fly in to sip, then have difficulty finding their way back through the little hole.

    Make since to me, and since I only have orange soda in a 2 liter right now, I'm going to try that. I'll report back!
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  13. #13
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    How is your insecticidal combat forthcoming
    Ann???!!

    As regards the recommended fruity-trap (sorry for probably inadequate terminology again)
    A far simplier model should work, too, and you can test it immediately after your visit to the supermarket:

    Fill a 10 L bucket with one L of apple juice and add one little dash of dish water concentrate, not more. Mix thoroughly, but gently as not to generate too much foam, then install this bucket close to the wasp's nest.
    Once any insect touches the liquid surface that will be inevitably the end of it..

  14. #14
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    Thanks, Hans!

    That's a great idea! We always have apple juice around.

    There weren't too many takers on the orange drink, but I suspect that the bees are filling up on the pears that have been bird pecked and fallen in the back yard. I will prepare a bucket as you suggest and put it under the pear tree and another near the nest.

    We'll see how well it goes from there....

    Thanks, again!
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  15. #15
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    OMG!

    I noticed today what I am doing wrong. I found a yellow bucket with a trace of water in the bottom (from watering, not rain) and wouldn't you know it? There were 4 yellow jackets swarming around in there.

    Tomorrow, I'm going to swap out my two bucket with yellow buckets.
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


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