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Thread: air layering

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
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    air layering

    As per Lindas suggestion I am going to try air layering some rhiodos and azaleas this year. When is the best time to do this. Help Linda and anyone else. The azaleas are finishing blooming now and the rhodo is just starting.
    tennessee sue

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2006
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    Zone 6, Parkersburg, WV
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    I've never used the air layering method. I searched and found a step by step article that may help you.


    Air Layering

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
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    Zone 9a - Gulf Coast
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    Soil layering might be easier.

    I have a Rhodo that someone gave me that was soil layered. It's several years old and has not bloomed yet, but that is a climate problem, I think. Azaleas thrive here, but true Rhodos have a hard time...
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  4. #4
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    Ann, The azaleas are in raised beds so I would have to use pots underneath to soil layer but there isn't a lot of room. It might be a good thing to try with the rhodos though. I think I will try both.
    tennessee sue

  5. #5
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    Sue,

    Azaleas root easy here without mist or anything like that. In fact, most people root them without rooting hormones.

    I say that knowing we are in probably the best climate for the majority of azaleas. I also know there are varieties that may do better elsewhere, but the majority of them absolutely thrive here.

    Have you tried rooting azalea cuttings under the 'greenhouse' effect? For the most part, they need humidity and warmth. Semi-hardwood is what most use here. Soft wood growth doesn't last long here, so the period of getting those kinds of cuttings is short whereas getting semi-hardwood cuttings are quite readily available.

    So, here I am, being dumb and trying to figure out why one would have to soil or air layer an azalea. And I do plead ignorance because we don't do that here. Ignorance because we are spoiled, I suppose...
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  6. #6
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    Ann, I have never tried to root azaleas before but was lead to believe they are hard. I will try to just do some cuttings and see how that works. I really need to get on the cuttings this week. I may actually have some time to work on it. I have found a young man to help me with my yard. He came today and mowed and weedeated for a very reasonable price and didn't cut down one thing he shouldn't. He is coming tomorrow to cut the hedge and help me unload mulch. I am so releaved to have found someone who cares about how he makes my yard look and I must say it looks good.
    I have really been fighting a battle with slugs now. It is always something.
    I will try to figure out some way to create a small area with Greenhouse effect tomorrow so I can get busy on the cuttings.
    tennessee sue

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
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    Sue,

    Native and deciduous azaleas can be difficult, but most of the evergreens that we have around here are quite easy.

    Keep us posted!!!!
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  8. #8
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    Dec 2002
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    northeast Tennessee
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    Ann, The azaleas I want to start are not evergreen. But I will give it a try.
    No time today to work on a cuttings area. I had a truck load of mulch to unload. Mulched one area of my back beds and got a good start on the front bed. The hedges got trimmed today.
    The front bed is coming along slowly. I did get mulched around the existing plants and a large area nearest the house. The iris along the driveway side of the bed will just have to come out so I can get the honeysuckle under control. My new little yard guy is going to help me clear out the rest of the garden and get it ready for mulch. It feels so good to finally be getting a handle on all the flowers beds and yardwork. All the potted plants can just sit on the mulch til I can get them planted and that will free up space for the nursery flats.
    It is wonderful to at least see the light at the end of the tunnel although I know I have a long way to go. Iam so glad to be back to my little house but boy things can sure go downhill when you leave it for a while.
    tennessee sue

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
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    Sue, I figured as much... I know you do your homework.

    Is there no way to soil layer? Air layering is hard here because of the heat, but may work better in your neck of the woods.

    Anyway, let us know how you do with the method that you choose, okay?
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


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