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Thread: Persimmon

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
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    Aching-back farm, Ralph Ala
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    598

    Persimmon

    True to form, I just discovered a new flower in my landscape/orchard. The tree is barely 7' tall, and produced about 30 lbs of baseball sized persimmons last season. I don't think there will be quite as many this year due to a late frost.
    Anyway, I thought some of you may have never seen this tree in bloom, so I've got a picture for you. The actual flower is mostly hidden by a green cap (the same color as the leaves), which stays with the fruit until it is havested.
    But if you look carefully, at the right time, you can see the little yellow flower hidden under the cover of leaves and the green cap. This little flower is only about the size of the tip of my finger. The thing that impressed me is the color, one of the few that I can see well. Enjoy:
    Attached Images  
    Tom W
    Aching Back Farm

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
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    northeast Tennessee
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    Tom,
    Sometimes those small hidden blooms are worth the hunt. It is so pretty. Have you seen the bloom on the paw paw tree? It is another pretty one.
    What did you do with the persimmons? I made persimmon jam one year. It was not my favorite,but interesting. Is this a Japanese Persimmon?
    tennessee sue

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
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    Zone 9a - Gulf Coast
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    Oh, Thank you, Tom!

    I missed the blooms on mine this year, but a couple of days ago, I spotted the fruit. It seems like I'm going to have a crop this year. Last year, I only had a couple of fruits and the birds got them, I suppose. But this year, I see quite a few.

    My tree is a baby compared to yours, and I don't have time to look up the tag, but it seems to me like mine is a grafted oriental variety.

    Anyway, it is FUN! My mother adores persimmons, and she misses getting them from my grandparents in Palacios, TX. So... I hope to have some to give her this year. My grandparents would store them green in a dark, somewhat cool (no air conditioning) area like under the bed. They would wrap them in newspaper and when they were ready for more, they would take some out, remove the newspaper and let them ripen.

    Now, I'm not so sure about all of that because I am remembering events from my childhood.

    Yum! Persimmons are excellent if they are ripened just right. I like them cold, but never ate very many because Mama liked them so much.

    Now that mine is fruiting, I will be sure to watch for the blooms next year. Really neat blooms, huh?
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  4. #4
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    Thank you for the opportunity to see not only a persimmon tree but the elusive flower ! Do the flowers have a scent ? I guess they don't grow much north of Alabama. Maybe some day I will see one and confidently say 'oh, that's a persimmon!'. I have never eaten a persimmon. What do they taste like ?
    I'd like to have 'volunteer' fruit trees pop up in my yard like that !
    Last edited by Dazed_Lily; 04-28-2006 at 05:39 PM.
    "If I keep a green bough in my heart, a singing bird will come"




  5. #5
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    Aug 2001
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    It's hard to explain, Cathy. They taste different than any other fruit you have ever had. They are sweet, not sour, not overly sweet, and the texture is very different. The texture around the seeds which are in the oriental variety is a little be like a soft , but more chewy gummy bear. The seed is so tiny and thin that you don't even know that it is there.

    The majority of the fruit is what I would call pulp. It is soft, and fine textured to the tongue, sort of like a lemon pudding, but no sour taste and a little bit more texture and less thick.

    They are really unique in every sense of the word, and well worth trying them if you can get them when they are chilled and ripe. My favorite part is that soft gummy bear like stuff around the seed, but that is because of texture, not taste. The best taste part is the pulp.

    I don't really know how to explain it better than that. I don't know of a fruit or a description that can explain it.

    Maybe someone else cn think of something... Sounds like I need to try to save one for you. You rarely see the fruit available on the market here, so I know it would be rare where you are.

    The native American variety has the same taste, but the seeds are quite large, about the size of an Almond. The fruit is not much bigger than a golf ball whereas the orientals are somewhat larger than a tennis ball. The natives grow wild in Texas, and those can be frozen and eaten later. Quite tasty and both are definitely sweet.

    However, be warned... With the exception of a newer variety, and I can't recall the name, you do not want to eat them before they are ripened. They will pucker the insides of your mouth and you will fill like you have eaten some sort of coarse cotton that cannot be swallowed or rinced out. It simply has to wear off... That is not goodness, and I promise you that I know that for a fact.
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  6. #6
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    Sweet sounds good to me. Cotton doesn't-blah ! Since most fruit comes to our stores here unripe, that could be pretty yucky. At one point in the description about texture, I started thinking mango but that gummy bear part is intriguing.
    Just curious what the 'test' is for ripeness(you know like pushing the bottom of a cantaloupe) ?
    "If I keep a green bough in my heart, a singing bird will come"




  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
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    You don't eat the skin. It pulls away quite readily. You can simply scoop out the pulp or skin it. That is your choice. The skin is quite thin, and when the fruit is ripe, it is very soft to touch. In other words, if you press into it with your finger and it 'indents' easily, it is ripe. If there is resistance to 'indention', then be leary... Not ready!

    Believe me, it doesn't take long to figure out when they are ripe. You just know by the squeeze.

    My best test for Cantolope is the smell along with the color, but the smell is the biggest key. Grown hundreds of those, but I prefer watermellon and that requires the 'thump' test. My grandpa taught me that one, and even Hunter is great at that now.

    Hunter is like me. He likes cantalope, but LOVES watermellon. Of course, both are better when chilled. My opinion... It gets HOT here, and the chilled fruit is great.

    Gotta tell you, though, nothing is better than strawberries, in Hunter's opinion. He eats LOTS and LOTS!
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
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    Aching-back farm, Ralph Ala
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    598
    Hmmm, Lots of questions, maybe a few answers.

    There are both astringent and nonastringent cultivars. You only need to bite one green astringent one to learn your lesson.

    If you have ever had a Paw-Paw fruit, then the texture is about the same of a ripe astringent pesimmon. The Paw-Paw is another fruit that is very hard to describe.

    I was not able to pick mine until quite late in the fall. Although they had turned quite orange, or yellow (pumpkin), they were still hard and bitter. I found that they can be ripenend by placing several in a bag with an apple for a day or two.

    They are good to eat, but some folks just do not like them. The mushy texture turns them off. But there are many wonderful recipes for cookies, breads, and other goodies.

    The flowers have little or no scent, and unless you are specificly looking for them, they will go undetected.

    Because they all get ripe at about the same time, and there are too many for me to eat (none of my family will eat them). I cut them in half, squeeze out the pulp into a collender, and press the pulp thru, leaving the seeds. Then freeze the pulp in 2 cup bags for cooking later.

    By the way, Alabama is not the only place they grow. The largest producers are of course in California. But I've seen the native trees in abundance in Louisville Ky.

    I just happen to have a picture of some that were just turning ripe from last fall.

    ??What did I leave out??
    Attached Images  
    Tom W
    Aching Back Farm

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
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    Zone 9a - Gulf Coast
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    Aren't they pretty?

    None ever went to waste in my family. There were never enough of them.

    Tom, I didn't realize they were hardy enough for that far north of us. I'm glad to know that.

    Time for my sister to get some started at the ranch. The grandkids love them, too! The native varieties grow all over the ranch, especially around the fencelines, but they are nothing compared to what you have just pictured.

    Yummy! I'm getting hungry for them, and it will be awhile even here before they are ready.
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


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