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Thread: Clivia Surprise

  1. #1
    Join Date
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    Clivia Surprise

    Last year, Rebecca gave me two clivia seedlings. They are doing well and are quite happy in my 'special' room.

    I remember Tom posting about his Clivia quite some time before that.

    A couple of months later, I spotted an different type of plant in the Lowe's garden center. I thought, "No, it can't be! Is it?" I looked at the labels, and sure enough, it said Clivia.

    They were huge even though they were in 1 gallon pots, and the mark down price was $5. I grabbed two and headed for the counter.

    They overwintered in the porch, not the patio. I had them hidden amongst some vines. Today, I spotted a bright color and moved some leaves to take a peak.

    One of the Clivias is in bloom, and it is a spectacular sight! And not only that, the one in bloom has a pup.

    Here ya go....
    Attached Images  
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  2. #2
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    WHAT A DEAL!

    And what a lovely cultivar it is. The markings are especially interesting.

    Sometimes you just gotta love Lowe's.

  3. #3
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    Robert,

    I think this is the more commonly available one. Still, I couldn't believe the price either. There were obviously no blooms, but the foliage without the blooms is beautiful. That's why I bought two.

    They are still in the same pots, and one is bursting at the seams with large roots that look like aerial roots coming out of the bottom. Right now, they are both in the patio trying to get as much sun as I can give them, but as soon as it gets a little cooler, I'll move them to the porch where they one bloomed last year (more humidity and sitting on the ground).

    The only thing that concerns me is that if I don't get a chance to repot them, they will dig their roots into the soil, making it difficult to repot them. As it is, I will have to carefully cut the pot to remove them.

    Rebecca's babies are still growing great, but they haven't grown as much as I would think they should, so they will go to the porch area this spring and get lots of fertilizer!

    Robert, be careful! This is another habitual plant, and right now, they can be really, really expensive! Maybe, just maybe, mine will make some seeds next year. They didn't last year.
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  4. #4
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    Clivias are a winter surprise. They seem to bloom in late winter or early spring. The color is absolutely beautiful. I have the common Clivia minuata (that Ann pictured in a previous post) and a variegated one (of course) of Clivia durama that has nice white streaking along the leaf but yet to bloom. There is a solid yellow one also but I've never had it. These plants love to be potbound and that encourages blooming. If you repot it, it may set it back for it's next bloom period so repot only when absolutely necessary and don't oversize the new pot. Fertilize after blooming to encourage growth of next years bud. This is a slow growing plant and takes a while before pups appear. I wouldn't be caught without a Clivia in my plant collection!
    Bob Beyer
    Austin TX, Zone 8b/9a

  5. #5
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    Thanks, Bob!

    The one that bloomed has a pup (as noted), and you can actually see the ouline of the roots of that one because the pot is bulging so badly. That's the one with roots growing out the bottom.

    I do not plan to repot it until after bloom time when the weather is warmer. To be truthful, that's primarily because I am out of space. I plan to put it in a more decorative pot, so that I can take it to school. Don't you think that beautiful foliage would look good on my window sill at school?

    So far, my room is decorated with posters, etc. like the normal classroom and these very pretty and colorful birdhouses that the students admire and never bother. It's geometry in motion for the kids! Besides, I think they like the home feel of the little extras in the room. Plants will add to it, so it's about time to do just that!

    Hey! Wouldn't they be in awe if it bloomed in the classoom?!?!?!

    Bob, Do you have any pictures of the variegated ones?


    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  6. #6
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    I've only seen these a couple of times. And they were very expensive. I love plants, but . . . . . . when I can buy 3 or 4 for the price of one. . . . . . well I gotta go with the quantity.
    Happy Growing,
    Vicki in West. Mich.

  7. #7
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    Ann,

    Clivias are very slow growers and don't use much by way of fertilizers, it is better to use fish emulsion on them. I know it stinks, but that is what they seem to respond to better than inorganic fertilizers.

    When you do repot, remember to use a soil less mix and add orchid mix to it. Could be the one that appears to be pot bound isn't really, but has sent its root where they can get better air circulation. That is a must for them.

    Also do give them as much sun as they can take w/o burning the foliage.

    Water when dry, they do like to dry out in between times too.

    Clivias do tend to rest in winter, meaning they prefer cooler temps and less water, so it's unusual that the one is blooming now. It could set seeds, if there are any pollinators around (insects, frogs, lizards running around), you'll know if it happens and it will take 6 months or longer for the fruits/seeds to ripen. The fruits can hold 3 to 5 seeds for each bloom that was pollinated. The fruit generally gets a red blush to it's cheeks when it's about ripe. I always let them remain until they split by themselves and often miss them. Which is o-kay as they are big seeds and fall to the base of the mother plant and will often send out a radical. They do take a few weeks to germinate, but once they start to grow they move on pretty quick for the first year or so before slowing down. Growing seedling warm year round can speed up the growth rate, but that may or may not be a good thing. C. miniata can bloom in 3 to 4 years from seed, the newer hybrids and the variegated onces can take up to five years. Fortunately, once they start to bloom they tend to be fairly dependable and will bloom at about the same time every year.

    Ann your Lowe's plant appears to be C miniata or the (common) "Lady Clive' or 'Kafir Lily', truly beautiful species. I was really surprised when mine attempted to bloom last summer after I so violently divided and re-potted it. I suspect it will take a couple of year to recuperate, which is fine. My remaining seedling is growing a little bit, but I don't water it very often either. If I did it might grow faster, but since is can get so cool in the basement I don't like to keep my tropicals to wet as that can invite rot.

    I've a daylily grower friend in Australia who also grows Clivas and has some very lovely pinks she has bred over the years. She's sending me a couple of seeds this summer, but after I get my small lots seed importation permit. So looks like I will have a creamy yellow one, now to just live long enough to see it bloom!

    Good thing really, that Clivias are expensive, otherwise I'd have another plant addiction to deal with!


    Rebecca
    Nature is trying very hard to make us succeed, but nature does not depend on us. We are not the only experiment.
    - R. Buckminster Fuller

  8. #8
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    Ditto! Ditto! Ditto!

    I couldn't afford another adiction, but I appreciate your babies that are growing and the two I managed to get at discount.

    Otherwise, I would have none!

    Thank you! Thank You! THANK YOU!
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  9. #9
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    Central Coast Australia
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    Living in a subtropical area Clivia miniata grows in the garden





    This is the spring flush but they do sprinkle blooms throughout the year.
    I do not actively polinate them but the bees do so if anyone would like a few seed let me know.

  10. #10
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    Very nice, Abby. You clivias look much better that the ones at our botanical garden.
    Dave

  11. #11
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    Absolutely gorgeous!

    I wish that they could grow in the ground here. If they could, I would do that!

    In the meantime, we can drool over YOURS!

    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  12. #12
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    for your lovely comments.

    I also have a pale lemon yellow with a dark yellow throat which is in bloom now. Unfortunatelly my camera will not pick up the delicate lemon and makes it appear more white.



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  13. #13
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    Seedlings Blooming for the VERY First Time - Soon!

    I could not believe my eyes a couple weeks ago when I spotted the first of my "mixed colors" hybrid Clivia seedlings from a friend in South Africa (who has since passed) when, low and behold, I spied a bloom stem forming! Over the next several days a few more have burst forth and now I have 5 that will be bloom, 3 of them in one community pot and the others in other community pots. I have to check my records to see when the seeds were originally sown as I can't remember! There isn't much color showing on any of the buds yet, only two have really expanded enough to really show their buds off well. I will add that I also have one of my 3 ancient C. miniata in bud and it is beginning to show it's color on the very tips of the buds.

    This coloring up of miniata has me thinking that some of these "mixed color" seedlings could be yellow or even cream! I should have re-potted them last summer and put everyone into their own pot and I wasn't able to get it done. Now I must get it done this summer so I can sell a few of them! I had planted between 20 and 30 seeds and have 20+ seedlings. No way can I keep them all - these guys do NOT go dormant like their cousins the Hippies! So they need good lighting the year round! I am so anxious to see these babies bloom!

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    RAW EXCITEMENT!
    Nature is trying very hard to make us succeed, but nature does not depend on us. We are not the only experiment.
    - R. Buckminster Fuller

  14. #14
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    I'm standing at the mailbox w/my checkbook in hand. I'd be honored to be the first to purchase a couple of your seedlings when they're ready to flee the nest....tagged "Becca's Babies". That's just what I need to f-i-n-i-s-h my clivia collection. My first 2 were gifted to me from a fellow Master Gardener 2 years ago and of course that began an obsession that grew like a weed. Among the dozen or so I've amassed there are a few variegateds but they'll not be blooming size for several years. I now have a Miniata and strong yellow in bloom. They smell wonderFULL!

    BTW...believe it or not I've so far lost NOT ONE seedling received last shipment. I've so far kept the heat ON and the gnats OFF quite successfully.
    Patsy

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Great-Full View Post
    I'm standing at the mailbox w/my checkbook in hand. I'd be honored to be the first to purchase a couple of your seedlings when they're ready to flee the nest....tagged "Becca's Babies". That's just what I need to f-i-n-i-s-h my clivia collection. My first 2 were gifted to me from a fellow Master Gardener 2 years ago and of course that began an obsession that grew like a weed. Among the dozen or so I've amassed there are a few variegated but they'll not be blooming size for several years. I now have a Miniata and strong yellow in bloom. They smell wonderFULL!

    BTW...believe it or not I've so far lost NOT ONE seedling received last shipment. I've so far kept the heat ON and the gnats OFF quite successfully.
    Hum, I have either not noted a fragrance or forgotten any on my C. miniata, but there could be a slight fragrance on seedling from intraspecific crosses. )the yellows).

    I was down this evening and no real color is showing and buds are getting nearly big enough to open (took snaps of the first three - happen to be in the same comm pot), but they are still in the camera! I also got a count; 19 mixed and2from specific Yellow crosses - they do not look like they will be blooming any time soon though. Getting rather antsy to see these babies myself! Won't be too much longer now though!


    "R"
    Nature is trying very hard to make us succeed, but nature does not depend on us. We are not the only experiment.
    - R. Buckminster Fuller

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