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Thread: Seeds sprouting...

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
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    Zone 9a - Gulf Coast
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    Seeds sprouting...

    I planted the daylily seeds, but I don't see any sprouts yet. Since I don't mind disturbing the ones in the community pots (3 gallon +), I ran my finger across a small section and sure enough, roots are forming, but no green yet.

    I don't dare disturb my daylily seeds in the old gh. They are the treasured seedlings from friends. They still aren't showing any top growth. Who knows what is going on underneath, but I am doing my best to resist disturbing those to check.

    Out of the hibiscus seeds (soaked until they sunk, but not pricked), I already see a couple of White Star Hibiscus (thanks to Bob Beyer) and a Texas Star (harvested here), but none of the others are showing first leaves coming up. I did note that it took longer to soak the hardy hibiscus seeds (before they sunk).

    I know that Cathy once inquired about seeds sinking as related to viablity. I do believe that depends on the seeds. Even the few hibiscus seeds that did not sink may eventually germinate. It's just that the ones that did sink indicate that the embryo has enough moisture to start growing.

    We are having extremely warm days (almost 80 today) and cool nights (below 60 degrees), and we are expecting storms tomorrow. We need the rain, strange as it may seem....

    I sowed some of the croscosmia seeds without soaking. They have not shown their first leaves yet. I'm going to wait and time them. After another week, I will soak some of them and try that.

    Gotta tell ya, though! I am still nervous about those refrigerated seeds. I sure hope they start popping up soon, so I don't have to worry so much.

    More seeds will be planted this weekend. Just have to decide which?!?!?!
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
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    Zone 9a - Gulf Coast
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    Seeds Sprouting

    If you have read the thread on the daylily forum, you know that some of the refrigerated daylily seeds are sprouting.

    The red and the white Texas Star hibiscus are sprouting.

    Pink Cornflower is starting to sprout. I wasn't sure about that one. I was afraid that they may need cold stratification. Also, the seed package (harvested seeds) dated 2001. I sure hope these will grow. I have really missed the one that 'went away' a couple of years ago.

    Still lots of seeds still to sow, but I'm trying really hard to keep the numbers manageable, so that means sowing a few more varieties every week.

    I believe I will start a few annuals this weekend as well as some crepe myrtle seeds.

    Also, I went to the store for more envelopes so that I can mail some seeds.
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
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    Zone 9a - Gulf Coast
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    I see a four o'clock emerging. Gee, they are enormous compared to other seedlings.

    Just a plug for one that I really like.... Limelight, I believe it is called, has beautiful chartreus leaves that will brighten any dark corner of the garden.

    I started some last year, got distracted by the hurricanes and lost them due to lack of watering (still in cell paks). This year, I intend to get them in the ground before that happens. They are hardy here. My mom grew them...
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Central Indiana Zone 5a
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    I love the 4 o'clocks and though they aren't hardy this far North, they re-seed like crazy so I rarely have to plant new ones. I do, however, move some seedlings to other places and have to pull a lot of extra seedlings. I have noted that if a specific color is pretty much isolated from others they do come true from seed, especially the yellow ones. I've had them come back several years in a rown on the south front porch and a lovely red/magenta comes back yearly in the bed between the proches.

    I pulled up a bushel or more of Black-eyed Susans from the south side of the house because they were taking over. I didn't dig around any though so there should be a few come back along with a couple of coneflowers that I had left alone, I think there's one white and one purple. After I see how many of the Black-eyed susans come back I may either scatter a few 4 o'clock seeds or move some seedlings over to fill in the blanks. It stays on the dry side they and the 4 o'clocks seem to like that. I like plants I don't have to give a lot of care to!

    I need to look through my saved seeds and see if I have any of the "white" African Merigold seeds left. I really like them! They don't get overly tall and the snails/slugs don't seem to both them as much (Japanese Beetles love them though). Also need to locate the Double Yellow Datura seeds that Donald sent me year before last and get some of them going; they'd look really good over on the south side of the house as well and I'd put one in the front between the porches and maybe have one in a tub for the patio area. (And then hope to get at least one seed pod so I can do them again nexxt year. I have/had seeds from the neighbor's white one. If I can find them I could put one back in the North corner of the back yard IF I can get the Red Twig Dogwood cut back. Probably ought to try to find a spot to move the Peonies to.

    It was right pretty earlier today and I did get out to the back seedling bed and pulled the mulch off of the potted plants and most of the seedlings still in the groud back there, now If I can keep the neighbors dog from sleeping in the bed and on my seedlings they may be okay.

    Oh yes! I found my packet of Pimulia umbulata (?) that I was able to harvest last summer and am going to try my luck at planting some of them for the shade garden. I was quite impressed with how the dark rose one preformed last year. Also have some seeds from Bittersweet I might try to sprout and grow (on the back fence).

    I don't have space under the lights, but I will have space outside on one of the stands to sow seeds from several perennials for later transplant to what I hope will be the new "nursery" bed. Siberian Iris, Hosta, Hardy Hibiscus, Columbine, Delphinium (it is rather old though so it might not be viable), Trumpet Lilies. Not sure anymore just what all I do have in the fridge. I do know I have a lot of Candy/Blackberry Lily seeds. Also have a slew of both saved and purchased annual seeds. The Clarey Sage would look very nice in amoung the daylilies in the front perennial bed; will just have to "weed" out all the Balsam seedlings that show up.

    Was talking to my pseudo-SIL about all the construction being done and how they marked the gas lines and recently, the water lines going through my flower beds. He seems to think they won't be doing anything withthe gas lines but they will be doing something to the water/sewer lines. So there's another bed that will have to be dug up. Which is okay as Iit is already on the list of beds to re-do this year. The only plant out there that I am concerned about is the Foxtail Liliy and perhaps all the small flowering onions (A. molly) and Scillica that are in that part of the bed. He's buds with the foreman and is going to see him this evening and he said he'd say something to him about my concerns over the flower beds. Guess I'll find out Monday if he really did say anything to him or if he was just blowing smoke. He is a BSer! And, if we have a few nice days this week I might see if I can geet him to come over aand do some heavy duty pruning on the big Red Bud Tree. And possibly some others.

    Brother, I do go on, don't I! Sorry about that!


    Rebecca
    Nature is trying very hard to make us succeed, but nature does not depend on us. We are not the only experiment.
    - R. Buckminster Fuller

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
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    Zone 9a - Gulf Coast
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    Thank goodness we do not have Japanese Beetles. I have heard lots of horrow stories.

    Rebecca, it might surprise you as to how many perennials do well up in your area, but will not survive here. I love to visit northern gardens, and you do have to realize that northern, to me, is anything more than 100 miles north of here. LAS!!!!

    The 4 o'clocks grow big tubers, and I do realize that once I plant them, I will probably always have them. I plan to put them in areas where it floods occasionally. At least, it is better than weeds growing. So far, the brugs have done well, but no matter how hard I try, I can't get mulch to stay in this area for very long. It washes away and what doesn't wash away decomposes too fast. That includes the cypress....

    I also need to find something to plant under the willow tree. Mulch doesn't wash away there, but doesn't last long enough and I have to prune it heavily to get under it to mow. BTW, it is sprouting leaves and is filled with what look like strange blossoms. It is also leaning about 30 degrees to the north. That was H. Rita's doing. Our grounds were soaked and those north winds seemed to last forever. I may try to plant some sedum there, but sometimes sedum like 'Autumn Joy' does not do well with too much heat. They also do not like wet feet, and this area is prone to flood ocassionally, so we may just try some of my rooted cuttings, 'just to see'...
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


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