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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    northeast Tennessee
    Posts
    1,703

    cuttings

    I'm getting ready to start propagating plants from everyone I know. What are some of the best plants that can be propagated early?
    Has anyone tried propagating flowering almond? I got one started from an offshoot once but I was wondering about cuttings on this one. Any advice?
    tennessee sue

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Zone 9a - Gulf Coast
    Posts
    9,934
    Sue,

    I rooted one of these once. Somehow, it got lost in the hurricane pot shuffle after Ivan. Anyway, I have not been able to locate it, so I plan to take more cuttings this spring after my neighbor's blooms.

    They are about as easy as it gets. I used rooting hormone, so I don't know how well it works without it.

    They sure are beautiful when they bloom, aren't they. Do you know how tall they get. My neighbor keeps theirs pruned down to 4 foot.
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Posts
    598
    Sue,

    You are just a bit late for dormant cuttings, and too early for new growth. Identify the plants that you would like to propagate, then look them up. If you already have a list of the plants , you could start dating that list for the best time to take cuttings of each individual. That way whenever an opportunity presents it's self, you could jot down the source for when the time comes.

    Whenever I am about to try propagating a plant that I have not done before, I do a search through Michael Dirr's book, and via Google on the net.

    Here is a part of a document I found on the propagation of your flowering Almond: (google: Flowering Almond Propagation)

    Propagation
    Seed - requires 2 - 3 months cold stratification and is best sown in a cold frame as soon as it is ripe[200]. Sow stored seed in a cold frame as early in the year as possible[200]. Protect the seed from mice etc. The seed can be rather slow, sometimes taking 18 months to germinate[113]. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots when they are large enough to handle. Grow them on in a greenhouse or cold frame for their first winter and plant them out in late spring or early summer of the following year.

    Cuttings of half-ripe wood with a heel, July/August in a frame[11, 200].

    Softwood cuttings from strongly growing plants in spring to early summer in a frame[200].

    Layering in spring.

    I do not have access to this plant but would love to try it, and establish a few round about the landscape here. I think I'll ask about it at Master Gardeners next week, maybe some kind person will offer cuttings.
    Last edited by Tom; 03-03-2006 at 04:08 PM.
    Tom W
    Aching Back Farm

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    northeast Tennessee
    Posts
    1,703
    Ann and Tom,
    Thanks for the info. I will try cuttings after this springs blooms. I never noticed seed before but will watch for them, I never looked before.
    It is still too early for cuttings here as Tom said. My daffodils are just now starting to bloom. Just planning ahead.
    tennessee sue

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