+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 4
FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 LastLast
Results 16 to 30 of 46

Thread: Intermitent Mist

  1. #16

    Mist

    Dear Group,
    I am one of the few who made it thru last summer with the 48.00 Nelson electronic timer.A bunch on the 'other board' had them but few made it.I would not recommend these to anyone.I stood to lose 1000's of cuttings on any given day,everyday I held my breath when I got home from work.I was so concerned I called Nelson customer service to complain.There reply was ,these units weren't intended for commercial use,my reply was then why in the #$&* are you selling them at commercial outlets?Low and behold UPS pulls up 3 or 4 days later with a back up unit which is still in the box.Even with that jesture I would not recommend these!!!!!
    William B.

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Center Point, TX
    Posts
    256

    Nelson Mist Timer

    What not to buy is as important to know about as what to buy. Could you provide model nember and where you got it and who recommended it as a usable timer for the info of all.

    What problems were you experiencing with the timer.

    Gary J

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    9

    Battery powered mist timer

    I purchased a battery operated propagation timer last year from dripirrigation.com. It has a mist cycle operation which I used from the end of April until October -- runs on two 9volt batteries which you replace each season. It worked flawlessly. The model# is 510.xxxp and it cost about $94. The controller part is separate from the valve and can be remoted up to 10 feet away, but as it is shipped it only has a short wire between the controller and the solenid and a snap-on bracket to mount the controller right on to the top of the valve. There is a parts breakdown that gives part#'s if you would need to rebuild the valve or replace the solenoid. It's timing cycle is as flexible as other mist timers I believe. I didn't worry about its operation as it is advertised and sold as a propagation timer. It has a LCD readout which has a low battery warning indicator. --Ran it all last Summer and the batteries never registered "low". We have our power knocked out on a regular basis due to thunderstorms during the summer --so I'm actually more comfortable with a battery operated timer than with the hard-wired type of timer/transformer controllers.

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Zone 9a - Gulf Coast
    Posts
    9,934

    Sounds Good!

    Thanks, John!

    This was would help me because we also get lots of thunderstorms.

    What is the BRAND NAME?
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  5. #20
    Gary,
    The model #5940.No one recommended it,some on freeplants were buying them to get started without spending alot of money.The only trouble I had was the batteries (two C)would get low a it would stick on mist,I was lucky it didn't stick closed.
    Mortons and A.M.Leonard sells them,which are commercial.
    Don't buy one,I repeat don't buy one!!!
    William B.

  6. #21
    Thanks John,I didn' know about these,I might try one before cutting time rolls around.I don't think my nerves will go another summer with the Nelson JUNK.
    Thanks William B.

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    9

    Battery Propagation Controller

    Here's the link to help navigate through the Drip Store at dripirrigation.com:

    http://www.dripirrigation.com/cgi-bi...744+1014536673

    This should take you to the Propagation controllers -- they are made by D.I.G. in Israel. It shows how the controller can be mounted onto the valve as I have described (or you could mount it on a nearby wall if desired). If you scroll down that page it also describes the programming of the controller. When I researched it last year, I thought their directions were a little difficult to understand and I had sent them an email asking several questions --they responded quickly and were very helpful. These products are always getting some improvements so these may operate a little different than my year old model. So -- if you have any reservations or need to have something clarified -- give them a call or send them an email. It was such a pleasure -- to hear the controller click on and to see the misters take care of business without fail every 10 min during the daytime operating hours-- ( I had to look up and catch a glimpse whenever I heard it!)


    John M

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Newport, RI/Richmond, RI
    Posts
    70
    Ok, I got my first prototype done. I have it switching on for 10-11 seconds and off for 12 minutes. I also made a version which switched on for 8 seconds every 8 minutes, and one at 4.5 seconds every 4.5 minutes. It ran a whole day with no problems on a 6V battery. In the final configuration, I'll probably use 3 of them to last longer. What range of timeouts are there on most timers? Do most people run 10 seconds every 10 minutes? Or something different? I'm up to about $10. I'm going to go get a relay (hopefully tommorow) that can handle 24 V. After I finish a formal one, I'll probably make one up on a piece of cardboard or plywood to try to make it as cheap as possible. When I'm done, I'll write up a parts list and draw a schematic.

    Bill Gauch.

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Kirbyville,Texas
    Posts
    156
    Bill,I knew you could do it.I would love to learn more on these timers. Maybe you could build them on a thin piece of plexiglass or maybe buy a small tupper ware box and then mount it inside it with the two wires poking out threw the sides
    just a thought
    Gene

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Center Point, TX
    Posts
    256

    Mist timer cycles

    6 seconds every 6 minutes and 6 seconds every 10 minutes seems to be the most talked abut cycles.

    Gary J

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Milwaukee, WI
    Posts
    11

    Lightbulb

    Hi All,

    Re: intermittent mist system. Mr. Mike (can't mention the whole name because of spam restrictions) got me interested in landscaping on a commercial basis. (I'm always trying to make something work.) I bought his e-book and then his videos. (BEST $200 I EVER SPENT!) Monumental amount of information. It was stated earlier that this information is free on the internet if you have the time to research it. I sincerely doubt that. How can you get one-on-one support from someone who has made tens of thousands of $ in the business from a casual conversation on the internet unless that person has been there.

    Anyway, I started looking at intermittent mist systems for around $400. Now, I'm not real good with solenoids, electrical stuff or even car batterys for that matter. So I was a little scared of all of this "stuff". Was walking through Stein's (local garden center) the other day and they have a mechanical or digitial water timer for $40 or $50 respectively. The settings are very precise, especially with the digital. Hook this to your water outlet and then to a hose and then to an old fashioned brass spray nozzle adjusted to a fine mist and WALLAH! An intermittent mist system for $50.

    Not an endorsement...just my thoughts......Steve

  12. #27
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Surrey, BC, Canada
    Posts
    221

    Mist timing

    Bill-the mist timing for outdoors tends to be 7 to 10 seconds, because you lose so much water to wind drift. The interval would range from maybe 7 min. on a really hot sunny day, to much less on a cool cloudy one-I cut it back to just a few sprays a day on threatening days last summer.

    I notice the greenhouse propagators talk about spray bursts of just 3 seconds, and that is every 10 or 15 minutes. They have little or no wind to worry about in a greenhouse, so they use really fine misters too. The shading in there can keep it cooler than outdoors, according to a buddy that grows bedding plants in greenhouses (tho his have the roll up sides as well--really effective for cooling but a lot draftier if you're trying to mist).

    I guess you have to consider your own unique situation, plus it really should change depending on the daily weather. I'm going to mist under cover/shade this summer, and hope to lengthen intervals between bursts, hoping most cuttings will appreciate this. I typically ran 10 sec. bursts every 10-15 min. in full sun last summer-trying to just let the cuttings dry out between bursts to discourage fungus. I'm sure folks down south use quite a different schedule, coz my idea of a real hot day is 30 C., and only get a few of those in a summer.

    Happy tinkering--Glen in BC

  13. #28
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Western Michigan near Muskegon
    Posts
    1,462

    what's up?

    Hi All,
    How did everyone do with their mist systems this year?
    Happy Growing,
    Vicki in West. Mich.

  14. #29
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Center Point, TX
    Posts
    256

    Mist system did great

    Our misting went great as has become the usual for us. Have lots of "new" plants to sell next year - at least unusual ones such as Phillipine Violet, Bush Morning Glory, Firespike, Cigar bush, Fire bush, Chinese Fringe flower, plus all of the normal stuff we have done before.
    Gary J
    Center Point, TX
    Hill Country Texas Master Gardener
    USDA Zone 7B
    AHS Heat Zone 8

  15. #30
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Zone 9a - Gulf Coast
    Posts
    9,934

    Re: Firespike

    Gary,

    Is the Firespike hardy for you there? Firespike, botanical name Odontonema strictum is an herbaceous perennial here and is more commonly known as Cardinal Spear to us. It has been very popular at the Fall Botanical Gardens sale the last 2 years.

    Some say that it is hardy in zones 8-11 whereas others say it is hardy to zone 7. I have a small one. It is still in a pot, and I am trying to protect it so that it can go to seed, then I plan to root cuttings and this spring I will put them all in my red/white flower bed which is partial shade and doesn't flood.

    Have you ever managed to collect seed from it?

    I am excited about this plant as they say it attracts Hummingbirds, and it certainly has bloomed well for me even though it is only in a 1 gallon container...
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 4
FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts