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Thread: Canna Seeds

  1. #1
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    Canna Seeds

    Only three, but they made it before winter freezes...

    I've been watching this pod for awhile. It's on one of my dwarf varieties. Don't ask me which right now. I forgot to check the label. Actually, I assumed that it was a mixed dwarf variety, but then remembered after dark that I had moved some labeled ones to that area after Rita.

    I think I should try to hybridise them. I will label the one that produces seeds, and it can be the Mama to some of the other dwarf varieties.

    Here is the S T R A N G E seed pod. I took this picture awhile ago. I'll have to look up when... MMMmmm, November 11, 2005 is the date of the photo.

    I can't wait until I can plant them and see a new type bloom!
    Attached Images  
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  2. #2
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    P. S. The smaller pods were empty which is what I usually have from my dwarf varieties.
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  3. #3
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    Ah ha ! I was going to ask which 'appendages' in the photo are the pods. Even though I have canna I have never quite figured this out. Know I know why, my pods look like the smaller flat ones . So, I suppose, no seeds !
    "If I keep a green bough in my heart, a singing bird will come"




  4. #4
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    Usually, the seed pods are symmetrical and just like a daylily will have seeds in each section. They are also usually more round than this one. I watched this one for awhile thinking that it may possibly have seeds since the pod was getting larger and larger. I was afraid that the pod would abort in a hard frost before it ripened.

    Needless to say, I was thrilled to harvest the few seeds, but the other pods were empty. I wasn't surprised. The pods were too small and not getting any bigger (a frequent occurence with the dwarf varieties).

    Next year, I really need to try harder to hand pollinate these dwarf varieties. Sure, some are sterile, but you never know when the pollen from a sterile one will work. You just have to try, like with daylilies.

    My cannas weren't as pretty this year as I expected because of wind damage and those horrible leaf rollers, but hopefully next year, they will be better established and we won't get so many storms.

    I guess we'll see....
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  5. #5
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    I started a few yellow cannas a couple of years ago, and now they are really thick, and need separation. You can make more plants, faster by simple root division than you can with seeds. Also, keep a close watch on them during dry periods; they really do not like to dry out.

    The "Leaf Rollers" are the larvae of moths and a few treatments right down the center of the new grow with BT or Liquid sevin should do the trick. You really don't need to "spray" the whole plant. Also, those planted in full sun seem to have fewer problems with leaf rollers, and bloom much better.
    Attached Images  
    Tom W
    Aching Back Farm

  6. #6
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    Tom,

    That is really a pretty one.

    Where do you get BT? Is it buried under a brand name at Lowes or Home Depot?

    I do not like to use anything if I don't have to, but after this past year, I think I should find something.

    I sure am glad they like full sun because that is about all that I have left.... Shade is getting hard to come by, so guess who will be planting more trees? I sure wish I could find the label of the 'baby' pecan on the west side of the house. It has grown huge in no time, but I think that is probably because it is on the 'down' side of my septic drain lines. Ie., it gets aged nutrients and plenty of moisture especially when it floods.
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  7. #7
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    Bacillus thuringiensis (BT) is the biological insecticide in Dipel Dust that is used to control Cabbage Loopers, Hornworms and other Moth larvae. I've never really looked for it at the stores you mentioned, I get it at the Farmers Co-op. But I would expect the others to have it. It is recommended for Organic Gardeners, so I wouldn't think it would hurt you, or your toads and lizzards.

    But if you aren't growing any of the listed crops, you may want to go with a small quantity of something like sevin or orthene systemic for spot treatment.
    Tom W
    Aching Back Farm

  8. #8
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    If I can't find the BT, I may just opt for the other... I hate to, but as you say, it is spot treatment. I don't recall ever seeing lizards on my canna and definitely don't wish to do anything that would harm those.

    Tom, the idea of seeds is not so much production of plants, but rather the hybridization. I do realize that this may not produce a prettier plant, but it is so fun to watch, wait and see. They do grow fast from seeds and if these hurricanes and dreaded leaf rollers will go away, maybe I will see a bloom.

    It's fun to try!
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  9. #9
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    Found BT at Home Depot under the brand name Thuricide HPC by Southern AG.

    Thanks, TOM!
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


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