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Thread: labeling pots

  1. #16
    Hi Becki,

    I had never thought of using clear mailing type tape over the sharpie marker on the label...Well then, I might give Mr. Sharpie another try...

    Thanks!

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Bolton, Ont
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    149
    Beck! Im surprised that the tape doesnt come off. The thought makes sense but with the sun and water I thought it wouldnt work.

    Beck I new the labels printed on the computer didnt have a long life, but less writing, taping. Thanks for sharing.
    George B.

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Union City CA 94587 --9A
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    marking pots

    I don't sell plants .
    ---I mark my pots with Crayons , They are cheap and come in any color you want .
    Example - reh dahlia in pot - put in white pot mark name of Dahlia with red crayon , even if some of name wipes , smears or goes away you still know what color .
    ---My Dahlias are blooming now . to mark plant , I cut up a costco red drinking cup into 1 inch strips , poke a hole in it , write name on it with right color crayon and hang / tie close to ground on stem with the same color pipe cleaner .
    I also use easter egg dye now you would have to get food dye/coloring , spray-mist color of flower on tuber , seed pod etc . Then I put in plastic sleeves [ when dry ] you put baseball cards in . You can then put in the baseball card holders that go in notebooks .

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
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    Central Indiana Zone 5a
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    I must still be back in the "caveman days" of plant labeling as I still use good old mini blinds and a fine-tip paint pen. The paint generally out-lasts the mini blinds!

    I've tried using the "Sharpie" permanent ink pens, but they fade very quickly in the sun, so those are only used under the lights on the community pots of seedlings.

    You can also make you own tags using (empty) soda/pop cans. Cutting the cans down and flattening the metal is the hardest part of the process. Cut the tin into strips and then write on them with a medium ball point pen (doesn't have to be one with ink in it either) The handel end of a crochet hook would also work and give a heavier embossing, You can also use the paint pens to write on them. A large nail will easily punch a hole in one end to use for tying the tags to the plant or even to attach to a straightened out wire coat hanger "stake". Use pliers to form an "S" in one end, hang the tag over the "S" and pinch closed with the plier.

    Finding wire hangers these days can be a problem, fortunately Dry Cleaners still use them and will sell you what you need, maybe. You can also fine the plastic coated wire hangers at most discount stores.

    Nothing beats a professionally made label, if you want to spend that kind of money on tags and lables. There are plenty of on line places that sell the nice, decorative "garden markers/name plates", and some that even engrave custom orders.


    Hope this gives y'all some ideas.


    Rebecca
    Nature is trying very hard to make us succeed, but nature does not depend on us. We are not the only experiment.
    - R. Buckminster Fuller

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Austin, Texas
    Posts
    279
    My best solution to the plant labeling problem is cutting up the narrow aluminum blinds and using a plain old #2 pencil. These aluminum blind tags last a long time and the pencil writing on them doesn't come off or fade egardless of weather or climate. Old blinds are easy to find - people are throwing them away all the time. Great way to recycle something as well.
    Last edited by txbeyer; 08-20-2006 at 07:48 PM.
    Bob Beyer
    Austin TX, Zone 8b/9a

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Union City CA 94587 --9A
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    tags

    I went to the plastic cups because I kept cutting myself on the blinds .
    By the way , I kept a can of PVC glue [ plastic pipe glue ] in my greenhouse because of it .
    It seals the cut [ burns a little ] and keeps out water , dirt - etc . It is also good for pulling out splinters , small thorns and sealing blisters .
    I use plastic screen on graphs and a dob in a couple of places holes in place . Works on string , twine and cloth .

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Zone 9a - Gulf Coast
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    9,934
    Roy, I don't know about the PVC glue. I think some people might have an allergic reaction or something. I'm not sure what all the product contains, but I'm glad it works for you.

    I have used the vinyl mini blinds for years, and have not had problems with the #2 pencil coming off or fading. I just have problems with them falling out of the pots during the 'shuffle' after a hurricane or T.S. Perhaps the lack of truly hard freezes prevents the pencil lead from breaking down during the winters.

    They are easy to cut with almost any kind of scissors.
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  8. #23
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    northeast Tennessee
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    Ann, The grease pencil will write on the pot which is why it might be good for you to try. You might lose a tag but the name wouod still be on the pot.
    tennessee sue

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Zone 9a - Gulf Coast
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    9,934
    Sue,

    When I purchased my Blossom Peacock Hippeastrum, the side of the pot had Double Picote written on it. The pot was black. The writing was white.

    I could tell that it wasn't written in ink or paint pen. It looked sort of like a white grease pencil. Is there such a thing?

    Where do you purchase 'grease' pencils?
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  10. #25
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Posts
    598
    I don't know if they are the same thing, but I think they are. A few months ago I found some China Markers at Home Depot. I'm using them to label plastic blind strips stuck in pots. They are real waxie, and have peal off paper covers. I cannot tell you yet how long they last, because they are still showing up now after a couple of months outside.
    The problem is, they only came in 2 colors in the Ceramic section. The two pack has one black and one red each in it.

    They also have some in office supply stores, but the one I tried had a pack of about 12, all the same color - black. I'll keep looking and let you (yawl) know if I find any white ones.

    These things will mark on just about anything, including glass. I'm just now trying them.
    Last edited by Tom; 08-23-2006 at 08:14 PM.
    Tom W
    Aching Back Farm

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Zone 9a - Gulf Coast
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    9,934
    Thanks, Tom!

    I'm trying real hard to remember. It may have been pink, not white, but it definitely wasn't red unless red on black makes pink.

    If you find more sources, let me know. I have looked when I think of it, but I rarely have time to shop nowadays. That's supposed to get better soon....
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  12. #27
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Austin, Texas
    Posts
    279
    You have to write awfully big letters to be able to read them using a grease pencil due to the width of them - this could be a problem for some of those long botanical (and even common) plant names. Writing it on a pot makes it difficult to reuse that pot (not sure how to get grease pencil off without smudging). Still think the alum. blinds cut to size and #2 pencil is the best solution for plant labeling.
    Bob Beyer
    Austin TX, Zone 8b/9a

  13. #28
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    northeast Tennessee
    Posts
    1,703
    Ann, The ones I have are balck,red,orange, yellow and white. I can't remember where I got the first ones but I got the last ones at the flea market. If I see them again I will get some for you.
    They do have a paper peel but the tip is about the size of a med. point marker. I used some on 4" pots of herbs years ago and still occasionally find one with the the writing still on it. THe writing stays forever but I found it can be removed with a little water and scraping with a dull knife.
    I've used every marker and paint pen I think there is and this seems to last longest for me. I also like the metal ones that indent when you write on them for in the ground plants.
    I haven't tried the pencil on blinds yet so I will take Bob's word and if I come across some blinds I'll try it.
    BTW some of the office supply stores carry grease pencils. They use them in construction to mark pipes and such so any home supply store might have them also.
    tennessee sue

  14. #29
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Union City CA 94587 --9A
    Posts
    40

    listo

    http://www.listo.com/pencil.htm#a
    They make grease pencils in about 9 colors and white .
    They have an 800 # .

  15. #30
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Yelm,Washington
    Posts
    18

    Cattle tag MARKER

    Hi;
    Go to your local farm supply & feed store they will have cattle tag markers and instructions how to use they are a liquid marker and they have two tips to mark with coarse ,fine tips.
    They stay put.
    John Sweaney Zone 8

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