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Thread: labeling pots

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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    northeast Tennessee
    Posts
    1,703

    labeling pots

    Always a problem. Tags get lost or mixed up. I noticed on the daylily forum some conversation about this problem, especially things that will stay in the same pot for a long time. I wanted to post here though so everyone that wanted to could try this.
    I have found that china pencils, also called grease pencils, work very well and never seem to come off. They come in different colors so can be used on any color pot.
    We tried stapling the tags to the pots but the tags eventually broke off so that didn't work too well for us.
    tennessee sue

  2. #2
    Because our winters are so cold, I cannot leave anything in a pot that I hope to see again. But I do think I will try to find one of these china markers (I know exactly what you are talking about) and will try them on labels in the ground.

    The sharpie type marker I am using now tends to fade, even in one summer. That will be no good at all.

    Thanks for sharing your idea,

    Andrea in Canada

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Bolton, Ont
    Posts
    149
    Sue Im going to try the markers mentioned. Im still using wooden signs.
    Andrea I do use the Sharpie markers either on my wooden signs and labels. They only last the 1 year but it beats painting them.

    I havent found a proven way yet, except different coloured pots.
    I only done this the one time. They were grape vines. I had about 50 Merlot (Black pot), 50 Reisling (green pot). Colour pertains to fruit.

    I sometimes will do this to identify 2 varieties that look alike a couple years until the start to show signs which variety they are.

    Guys signage is either done the cheap way which we are doing or spend some unnecessary dough on signage.

    George.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Surrey, BC, Canada
    Posts
    221

    Sharpies, etc

    I've also found sharpie pens undependable. They are sold by nursery supply folks like they were the definite marker for us, and sometimes they do last for years. Then there are all the labels that are gone after a few rains, why?

    I did try to stick the labels with the writing facing away from the sun, but it also seems the label material might be part of it. I have some labels from others that have kept their writing for years, I think it's coz these are good quality blank labels, no shiny surface like the cut up mini blinds I've been using.

    I'm now just using pencil, it seems to last longer than any type of felt or pen!

    The grease pencil sounds good if you can just write on the container itself, not so good for eventual sales but sure helps the grower in the nursery, eh?

    For selling, the colour tags are really important...studies have shown how people will buy more and pay more for a bigger more attractive tag on the "same" plant. Well worth the few cents if you're growing lots of one thing.

    Glen

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    nashville,tn area
    Posts
    59
    Hello All,
    Talking about signs I'm sick and tired of hand writing them.You can get real nice wire on tags at Great Western,they are .07 each if you buy 100 at a time.My only problem is they they have 80% or so of what I grow.That leaves me with 20% or so to not lable or hand write.These tags sure make a difference in sells,like someone else stated.
    They will have a general tag like Oakleaf Hydrangea.But they won't have ''Pee Wee'' or "penny Mac''
    Some one on here was using Horticopia products can't remember who at the moment.I sent off for info.its sorta pricey for a tight wad like me.Dont know if the 20% I don't have would be worth it?Its between that and a stand up fertilizer mochine,like my ole buddy Shepp bought.
    Well thats enough for now,I'm a slow typer ,this little bit took about 30mins,thats why I don't post much.
    Thanks,
    tony b

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Bolton, Ont
    Posts
    149
    Glen
    You brought up some past. I remember making those darn tags from blinds. I tried to staple it to a wooden piece of wood and they would crack. Tried to stick em in the pot and they would bend. Cut them shorter etc. things we tried in order to save money. We'll keep trying new things until we move that much closer.

    Ive tried the large copper plant markers. Their good til they start to loose their copper colour. Again not cheap. I use them on plants like Taxus Yews that I grow every year so they'll be used every time. Thats when the Sharpie helps me out.

    Im trying to get a Dot matrix printer going. I ordered enough strip labels to try it out. Software is 75.00. I remember seeing these at Nurseries. Their water proof but the print eventually disapears probably from the UV. I probably wont need them until my plants in the sales station start to be unorginized. The big signs I print out start to fade during the season as well, Inkjet inks are not UV. Take care!

    Im submitting this in a hurry cuz my internet connection is going down every few min.
    George.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Western Michigan near Muskegon
    Posts
    1,462

    Tags

    Have any of you tried MasterTag? I worked there for the winter a couple years ago, they have ALOT, not saying all tags, but ALOT.
    http://www.mastertag.com
    average cost for perennial tags 3.2 - 3.9 cents ea.
    Happy Growing,
    Vicki in West. Mich.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    nashville,tn area
    Posts
    59
    Vicki,
    Thanks for the Master tag tip,I didn't see any woody shrub tags ,maybe I missed them.Heres what I've been using at .007 ea,I hope this goes thru.http://www.gwestern.com/popup_image....5e312e30fbce3e
    Thanks
    tony b

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Western Michigan near Muskegon
    Posts
    1,462
    Tony,
    I know they do have tags for like hydrangeas. But wouldn't know where to find them on the order form. Maybe if you e-mail them, they can point you in the right direction.
    Happy Growing,
    Vicki in West. Mich.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Staten Island, NY
    Posts
    121
    I kind of agree with Glen; a plain ordinary pencil seems to work best. I've had penciled labels that were still readable after 8 years. I use, mostly, white plastic pot tags, that are pointed on one end and, on some bushes, the kind that wrap around a branch, and then get poked through a little hole punched near one end. I try to write the name on both sides, to be sure, but this is very time consuming. The biggest problem I've had with either of these, is that they eventually get brittle, and break off. With the pot tags, this problem can be somewhat alleviated by pushing the tags deep into the soil, with only the tip showing. Of course, this means you have to pull the tag out to read it, and if a customer does that, and doesn't replace it properly, well... Then, sometimes, the labels simply disappear. I blame this mainly on squirrels, or something, digging in the pot as I have, occasionally, had entire plants just vanish from the pot.
    Some of the best labels I've seen were pressure sensitive ones, stuck on the side of pots. I got some of these on plants that I received from a supplier. We stepped the plants up to larger pots and, when I went to reuse those pots for other plants the labels were still there. When I pulled them off, I saw they were vinyl, (I couldn't tear them) so they didn't deteriorate, like paper ones. I don't know what kind of a printer they were made on.
    At some trade shows, I've seen a "nursery label printer". It's a thermal printer, about half the size of my ink-jet printer. It can do all kinds of labels; stick in, wrap around, and pressure sensitive. It comes with a little mini keyboard, and the company sets it up for the format you want to use. When I asked if you could change the format for different size, and kinds, of labels, I was told I could only do that if I used it with my own computer, rather than the little keyboard, and the price would still be the same -$800.00.
    I looked on the web, and found thermal printers for a couple of hundred less, bu I'm still reluctant to spend that kind of money on a machine that does only one job. I thought, for that amount, I could buy a pretty good laser printer, maybe even a color one (to put pictures on the tags), and I could also use it for other things. Does anyone know how laser print would stand up to the elements, and if a machine like that could print on pressure sensitive vinyl?
    John_NY
    USDA Zone 6/7
    Sunset Zone 34

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Bolton, Ont
    Posts
    149
    John
    as mentioned on my last post, All inks from a printer will fade unless their UV inks. Big $$$$$ if they are. I heard of weatherproof and fadeproof ribbons. I have no idea if their that good. 15.00cdn per ribbon colour.

    I did see a product that you spray on the sign to prevent fading.
    Its called something like sign coat spray. Sun block, Moisture seal, Enhances colour brilliance. But at 16.95 cdn per can it was a no way charlie deal.

    Did you check out thermal adhesive labels. Their suppose to be weatherproof/ waterproof.

    Signs are expensive so I just print out 1 large colour detailed sign per plant, whether the plant was grown here or purchased.

    John If I buy a plant I request loop labels unless plant has tags already attached.
    George.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    SE PA, zone 6b
    Posts
    217
    I have a tremor which greatly affects the legibility of my handwriting. One person on another forum used the P-touch labels and was very satisfied.

    I have a bunch of metal labels with long legs that push into the ground. I plan to label everything with the P-touch labels. They are UV protected, so should last for awhile. There are several places that sell the metal labels in lots of 100 at a pretty reasonable price.

    I will also use the P-touch labels on hanging tags for the daylily (and other) crosses I make. For plants to sell, I will use stamps on wooden tongue depressers. They don't last long, but will work on plants for sale.

    I will be out of the country for a month and will have plenty of time to figure out this P-touch machine, and make a bunch of labels. Next, when I return, I need to figure out which plants they belong to. The nursery labels faded out completely in just a few months. --SIGH--
    Sandi
    SE PA, zone 6b

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    nashville,tn area
    Posts
    59

    Found IT

    I findly found what I was looking for in the way of tags.I've been going thru a middle man to get tags,found where they get theirs.Will save .02-.03 cents per tag plus there is a large sellection that Great Western don't carry.Maybe this will help some of you that need a professional (ha ha) looking product.When I sell in my backyard don't matter.In spring and fall I go to a high end farmers market,everything has to be labled.Plus this really helps sell plants thats not in bloom.I add about 2.00 or so for these taged plants and get it.
    Here it is:
    http://www.horticulturalprinters.com/

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Bolton, Ont
    Posts
    149
    Tony Its great you found what your looking for. The original thread was about making tags at home to organize pots. I was trying to help you out with something that was home based.
    George.

  15. #15

    What works for me...

    Hey Folks,
    Sounds like we're all in the same boat trying to find a workable solution to the tag problem. I've tried just about all of the things discussed already; seemed they were either too labor intensive, too expensive or just didn't last as long as I needed them too.

    This year I used the adhesive labels made for printing off on your computer only I DIDN'T print them off on my computer. (Already tried that last year and they faded too fast) I hand wrote out, all in one sitting, the labels I would need with the permanent Sharpie pen. Seemed these labels were just pourous enough for the ink to soak into so they wouldn't fade so fast.
    From the time I started some of my seeds indoors in winter to mid summer outdoors with almost every other day watering and/or rain, the writing on the labels had not even started to fade. Some of the labels were getting a little frayed around the edges and on these I used my clear mailing label tape to protect them a bit more. This worked out well for me and I'll be continueing to do this from now on.

    Becki
    Becki B.
    Central Ohio
    Zone 5b-6

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