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Thread: Garden Visitor And Flying Flowers

  1. #1
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    Garden Visitor And Flying Flowers

    The rains we've been having have brought visitors to my gardens! Butterflies and a "Hummingbird Moth". I even saw a few Swallowtail and Monarch butterflies, but of course, they wouldn't pose!

    Not sure what this one is, but it really "hammed" it up for the camera!
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    With wings closed:
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    "Here's lookin at you, kid!"
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    "Are you sure you have my good side, Mr. DeMile?"
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    I haven't seen one of these in ages, guess this is one of the perks of being unemployed!

    This is a side view:
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  6. #6
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    This is the best shot of this lovely creature, the "Hummingbird Moth".
    The blur is it's wings, just like a real Hummer, they are in constant motion!
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    I liked this image too:
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  8. #8
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    Flying things

    Thanks for those photos, Rebecca. I have an interest in butterflies/moths, but like lots of things now the old brain just can't seem to keep names for long. The second orange butterfly looks similar to one we have here, fairly common. Never seen one like the first tho!

    The hummingbird moth might also be called sphinx moth here, and we very rarely see them. They cause quite a stir in the evenings when we're sitting under the pergola with all the tubs and baskets of flowers and one of these "huge" moths visits! I do seem to remember that at least one type of these is the adult of the nasty green tomato hornworm...I think it's worth losing a tomato to enjoy a neat flying creature like this moth...

    I also think we see much fewer butterflies the last few years here because of large scale gypsy moth spraying (using BTK, which kills all types of caterpillars). If only we could turn the gypsy moths into all the different types of beautiful moths/butterflies instead...they are a scary pest that hasn't managed to establish itself here, yet...

    Glen

  9. #9
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    Glen,

    While the fight against the Gypsy Moth has had some impact on the Butterfly and Moth population in general, I feel the biggest reason for the decline is due to habitat destruction.

    So many species are "host plant dependent", most of which are not necessarily desirable "garden plants" or are considered a nuisance to crops (common milkweed, for instance, which is the host plant for Monarch Butterflies.)

    Of course there are many other issues that also contribute to the decline in the numbers of Butterflies and moths we see; air pollution, our increasing reliance on pesticides to control harmful insects, and so on and so forth. It really makes my spirit cry to see what we have done to Mother Earth.

    I do use a growth retardant in my pond to control misquotes, but it hasn't had an impact on the Dragonfly or Damselfly population in my gardens, in fact I think it has helped as I have seen a significant increase in the number of these that frequent my gardens and have seen several "skins" on the sides of my pond (a 125 gallon stock tank) left by the Damsel and Dragonflies as they reach their final stage of development. Seems, though the mosquito wigglers population in the "pond' get really fat and provide very rich food for the Damsel and Dragonfly nymphs. The Damselflies have been the jewels in this summer's gardens and I would much rather have them buzzing around me than the misquotes!

    Next year I hope to have lots of milkweed for the Monarchs, not only in the flower beds here but also over at my "Borrowed Garden" where my daylily seedlings are being grown.

    Rebecca
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