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Thread: Yellow Iris

  1. #1
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    Yellow Iris

    My neighbor has a large bed of these. I am not sure what kind of Iris they are, but they make a nice sized bed.
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    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  2. #2
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    Bloom

    Here is a closeup of the bloom...
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    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  3. #3
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    Seed Pod

    A seed pod forming...
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    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  4. #4
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    I have the same plant in three different areas here. I had always thought they were Louisiana Iris, but I can't find one identical to the bloom. They are very prolific, and form a very tight clump. The ones here are about 3-4 feet tall, and do well in sun or part shade. They were here when I arrived, and have steadily increased their numbers. There are also some accross the road in a ditch that were not discouraged when I ran over them with the tractor and bushhog last summer.
    Assuming they are some cultivar of the Louisiana, I'm planning to put some in a boggy area near the pond out back. I'll put them in a position that will be away from the water. I do not want these bog plants encroaching on my pond.
    Last edited by Tom; 04-20-2005 at 12:55 PM.
    Tom W
    Aching Back Farm

  5. #5
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    This iris grows and has a flower identical in shape. I was waiting for it to bloom because, being color blind, I couldn't describe it. I asked my wife and she says it's purple. They put up a very tall stem, about 4 ft, and then start blooming at the top. As the top finishes, then lower side buds that developed while it was growing begin to flower.

    I only have two of them, from a neighbor, but they seem to be multiplying like the others.
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    Last edited by Tom; 04-30-2005 at 05:59 PM.
    Tom W
    Aching Back Farm

  6. #6
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    iris ceadaris if i spelled it correctly is the yellow one.

  7. #7
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    Jan 2002
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    i did mispell it.
    IRIS pseaudacorus L.
    these iris are profuse seeders.
    tom if you plant them anywhere near your pond i would guess that they will still end up in the pond.
    i have had them in my garden pond for 5 years. in a pot and have had to divide them every year. tremendous root system.
    i dont think they will hurt your pond. i have seen them on the shorelines of the portage lakes in akron oh. area.
    bullfrogs like them.what i like the best about this iris is even when they dont have bloom anymore is how they lend the appearance of looking like ornamental grass.how they shimmer and move in the breeze.
    i plan on transplanting a bunch of these today.
    just my 2 cents worth.
    read alll about them here!
    http://www.offwell.free-online.co.uk...urvey/iris.htm

  8. #8
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    Tom,

    Your's looks a lot like the wild Iris I have in my garden, I vesicolor. It does it's best in boggy areas but I have also had acceptable results growing in the the perennial beds. It does seem to withstand dought, usually scarificing blooms or seed pods, depending on what time of year drought occurs.

    After some reading I decided to try a few fans in my above ground "pond", so I located a decent sized rhizome and potted it up and set it in the "pond", after putting empty containers into the "pond" to hold it just below water level. So far so good, it seems to like the arrangement.

    There's a waterlily in there somewhere, but growth seems a bit slow to get started this year. Must be this funky weather we've been having - water just isn't warming up as quickly as it generally does.

    Rebecca
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    Nature is trying very hard to make us succeed, but nature does not depend on us. We are not the only experiment.
    - R. Buckminster Fuller

  9. #9
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    Here's an image from a couple of years ago. At the time this plant was growing in a somewhat dry location, but it had been a very wet Spring so it did grace me with plenty of blooms that year!

    Rebecca
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    Nature is trying very hard to make us succeed, but nature does not depend on us. We are not the only experiment.
    - R. Buckminster Fuller

  10. #10
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    sorry
    what i posted is the type ann posted.
    so sorry charlie

  11. #11
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    Feb 2002
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    You made it clear which one you were talking about in your other post Shepp.

    Anyway, I have both, and have been considering planting the yellow one near the pond. It's 2 acres, and stocked with Bass and Bream and I am concerned that I don't start something that I can't control down there. I've seen folks plant Lilly pads, and Cattails and end up choaking the life out of their pond. There are a couple of boggy areas near the pond that I may try, but I need to be sure I can get them under control with something like Roundup if they don't behave. KnowhatImean - Vern?

    I've been propagating some of my favorite "deer resistant" plants and planting them along the walking trail all around the pond, but it takes a lot of time and work to make a show down there. Some of the plants that are supposed to be resistant turned out not to be, but so far they are still making it.
    Tom W
    Aching Back Farm

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