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Thread: Geraniums

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Central Indiana Zone 5a
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    Geraniums

    One of the geraniums I decided to carry over actually produced seeds and I did save quite a few of them, but it would appeare that I missed one or it had it's own plan! Anyway, I have (what turns out) to be a geranim seedling growing in one of the pots of Clivia seeds I sowd earlier in the fall. At first I did not know what it was since I've not grown greaniums from seed before so I just left it alone until I could tell if is was something or just another weed seed.

    Anyone know how long it takes geraniums to flower from seed? How big should I let it get before transplanting it into it's own container? It has 3 or 4 "true" leaves now and seems quite content where it is, it just can't stay there since the Clivia seedlings have much different requierments.

    Thanks in advance!

    Rebecca
    Still being surprised by Mother Nature!
    Nature is trying very hard to make us succeed, but nature does not depend on us. We are not the only experiment.
    - R. Buckminster Fuller

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Maryland zone 7
    Posts
    28
    Hi Rebecca,

    I'm thinking you are growing a hardy geranium. Most bloom the second year from seed. Generally when a plant has one to two sets of true leaves you can transplant.

    Newt
    When weeding, the best way to make sure you are removing a weed and not a valuable plant is to pull on it. If it comes out of the ground easily, it is a valuable plant.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
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    Central Indiana Zone 5a
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    Newt,

    This seedling is definitely NOT a hardy geranium - Cranesbill. I also grow them and am very familiar with what those seedlings look like as I have had to pull too many that came up in the wrong place! LOL!

    I know the Cranesbill can rocket off it seeds to pretty distant places, but I don't think it could manage to get one all the way to my basement and into a pot containing Kafir Lily seeds that haven't seen daylight since being harvested. No, this little guy is the 'annual', bedding type geranium.

    Thank you for the info on the time between seed and bloom on the Hardy Geranium/Cranesbill, though.


    Rebecca
    Nature is trying very hard to make us succeed, but nature does not depend on us. We are not the only experiment.
    - R. Buckminster Fuller

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Zone 9a - Gulf Coast
    Posts
    9,934
    Rebecca,

    In my experience, zonal geraniums can take a very long time to bloom from seeds. Keep in mind that I started them in a greenhouse that I only heated on really cold nights. They also have a tendency to get leggy. Commercial growers use a growth retardant.to make them shorter and more stocky. I don't remember how long it took them to bloom, but it was a LONG time. For that reason, I do not even try them anymore.

    Also, commercial growers use plugs of rooted cuttings or will purchase unrooted cuttings if they do not use their own stock rather than grow them from seeds. Under optimum conditions, the cuttings will bloom in 6 weeks.

    Newt,

    I adore the hardy geraniums, but they don't adore my climate or the acidic soil. I have some growing in pots, and they do okay. Not good, just okay... I rarely see blooms. Nice plants, though! Have fun with them!

    Everyone,

    My favorite geraniums are the ivy geraniums, but I have to take care that they are located where they won't be soaked by the heavy rainfall that we have at times. Seeds of these are very high because they don't produce very many seeds. They are usually easy to propagate from cuttings and grow fast.

    ENJOY!!!
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Maryland zone 7
    Posts
    28
    Hi Ann,

    Maybe the hardy geraniums you are growing aren't ones that are happy in your climate. Here's a site located in zone 9, also on the coast, but in California that might get your plant budget in trouble. ;-) It does have some very useful info too. Oh, and most hardy geraniums will grow in a pH range of 5 to 7.

    http://geraniaceae.com/

    Here's a couple that might get your fancy and will even grow in zone 10.
    http://www.laspilitas.com/plants/326.htm
    http://www.laspilitas.com/plants/327.htm

    Here's a list that should be happy where you are.
    http://www.desert-tropicals.com/Plan.../Geranium.html

    Newt
    When weeding, the best way to make sure you are removing a weed and not a valuable plant is to pull on it. If it comes out of the ground easily, it is a valuable plant.

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