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Thread: Monster Grasshoppers

  1. #1
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    Monster Grasshoppers

    These critters can do major damage to a plant in no time. They are hungry, and they chow on just about any of your favorite plants.

    I spotted this one today on a hibiscus at the Island. I told Hunter to wait to come near until I too a picture with my camera. Surprisingly, the critter didn't budge while I took one after another pictures. Perhaps he was playing dead. What do you think?

    Hunter and I were fascinated. Usually grasshopper popped away anytime anyone is near.
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    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  2. #2
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    Since he didn't seem to care, I was able to get the camera about an inch away from him...
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    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  3. #3
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    This was his feast....
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    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
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  4. #4
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    Ann,
    He is huge. Is he one of the ones that come every 17 (?) years?
    Happy Growing,
    Vicki in West. Mich.

  5. #5
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    Vicki,

    I wish they would only show up every 17 years! Thank goodness, you don't see them very often.

    It is not unusual to spot them in our gardens, but they are not as abundant as the smaller ones who are just as hungry.

    Perhaps Tom knows the name of this particular creature...
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  6. #6
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    Cicada's come every 17 years.

    ann you should have caught it and used it for bait.
    its called a grasshopper. any more info about this bug would be an info overload.bait or step on it.and then a bird will eat it.

  7. #7
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    or...I used to have a dog that ate grasshoppers(that size too) and grub worms----good dog !
    "If I keep a green bough in my heart, a singing bird will come"




  8. #8
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    Shepp,
    When I seen that cicadias, yep now I remember NOT grasshopper. Yep should've used it for bait, instead of a flower trimmer.
    Cathy, my dogs eat bugs and stuff (pond plants ), too.
    Happy Growing,
    Vicki in West. Mich.

  9. #9
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    Shepp!

    Great minds think alike. Hunter's first comment was that it would be great for bait.

    When he asked if he could catch it, I told him that he could, but I had no idea if it would bite or scatch him. We left him there so that Hunter could show it to Papa.
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  10. #10
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    How did this suddenly show up after all this time in the background. Today, it was presented as a "New Message" even though the last reply was long ago.

    Anyway, there are a couple of comments I could make concerning the photo:
    First, it appears to be a locust:
    A locust is a large grasshopper showing pronounced, density-dependent polymorphism, that is, the development of different types of individuals brought about by changes in the size, or numbers, of their population. About a dozen species in the short-horned grasshopper family, Acrididae, have evolved this capacity to change their habits and appearance according to their population density.
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    Tom W
    Aching Back Farm

  11. #11
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    cicada

    One of the possibilities mentioned was a cicada:

    The periodical cicadas, family Cicadidae, whose life cycles are 13 or 17 years long, are locally known as 13-year or 17-year locusts. They are not true locusts, however, and are related to the aphids and treehoppers, order Homoptera.

    The cicada, family Cicadidae, order Homoptera, or harvest fly, is a winged, stout-bodied, and blunt-headed insect with sucking mouthparts. From June through September, males sit in treetops throughout most of the United States and produce typical loud buzzings or whistles. In North America, cicadas are incorrectly called locusts.
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    Tom W
    Aching Back Farm

  12. #12
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    you just had to do it Tom.
    now my head hurts.
    they wont hurt Hunter!
    3 years ago we were hand feeding a bullfrog the17 yr. cicada's , he got fat.
    grasshoppers are just bait also.

  13. #13
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    Tom,

    Locust is what came to my mind first, but I didn't know. I just know that I see a big one like this once in awhile, and they always leave lots of damage. This critter is over 3 inches long.

    I remember seeing swarms of locusts (and hearing them) when I was a child in Texas.

    I don't ever remember seeing them up close. We always ran. That was a very long time ago!

    LAS!

    Shepp, Glad to know they won't hurt Hunter. They look like they could....
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  14. #14
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    From an internet search:
    "Grasshopper is the name applied to almost 9,000 different species of singing, jumping insects in two families of the order Orthoptera."

    9,000 ! It's going to be a long winter. Please does somebody, anybody, know an entomologist ?!

    "If I keep a green bough in my heart, a singing bird will come"




  15. #15
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    Sorry Shepp,

    Didn't mean to 'Bug' ya.

    Ann,

    Shepp is right, they will not bite, but they may spit on you. Maybe you could enlist Hunters help in catching a few toads, and lizards for your garden. There are subtle little ways you can actually construct "shelters" for both within a flower bed.

    Dazed_Lily,

    If you remember the old TV show Kungfu, the wandering priest named Cain was also called 'Grasshopper' by his chinese mentor. Does that mean there are 9001 Grasshoppers?

    Sorry folks, it's raining and cold outside and I don't have much else to do.
    Last edited by Tom; 11-27-2004 at 09:36 AM.
    Tom W
    Aching Back Farm

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