+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: Daffodil pointers

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Wichita,Kansas
    Posts
    3,680
    Blog Entries
    2

    Daffodil pointers needed

    I'm in Zone 6 and my rescued Easter daffodils,still in pots, are sending up green growth--I know this can't be good this time of year. Can I do anything to help them ? At some point I was going to put them in the ground. Should I just go ahead and do this anyway and what are the chances they will be back in the spring. I also have other daffs that didn't bloom this past spring despite resetting them and putting goodies in their soil--any ideas on why the failure to bloom for those ?
    "If I keep a green bough in my heart, a singing bird will come"




  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Central Indiana Zone 5a
    Posts
    4,917
    Blog Entries
    8
    About all you can do is to plant them and see what happens. As for the bulbs you moved and re-planted not blooming this past Spring, give them time, if they don't start blooming this coming Spring, they could be too deep or you have added too much nitrogen to their growing area.

    Good luck!

    Rebecca
    Nature is trying very hard to make us succeed, but nature does not depend on us. We are not the only experiment.
    - R. Buckminster Fuller

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Posts
    598
    Bulbs require adequate moisture while they are growing, and a good drying out during dormancy. You may have given them too much water during a weather change, which triggered the top growth. Forced bulbs can usually be recovered, but it may take 2 years. Just let them finish the growth pattern in the pot, then transplant them.
    You should fertilize the bulbs in spring and fall with a low nitrogen, high phosphorus and potash, such as 6-24-24. If you build the roots and bulb, the blooms will come. When you plant, put them about three times their diameter deep. The soil should be sandy and well drained.

    The ones that did not bloom may have been moved at the wrong time. Even when you move them at the right time, it may take a year or more for them to adjust. Moving/separating should occur 4-6 weeks after blooming. The tops will start to turn yellow and fall over. When the tops die back they start a rest and drying out period. Cool weather triggers new root growth, and the warm spring sun starts the top growth and blooming. Here again, be very careful with the nitrogen, even during their dormant period, it may not be used up or leach out before the bulbs start to grow. So if you are growing some other summer flowers over the dormant bulbs, they should be ones that require less water and fertilizer, or can use the same formula as the bulbs.
    Tom W
    Aching Back Farm

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Wichita,Kansas
    Posts
    3,680
    Blog Entries
    2
    Thanks all for the info.
    Tom- it sounds like the advice is to treat the early sprouters as forced bulbs; correct ? If so, I'd assume bring them indoors should frost be a threat ?

    Hmm, I did tranplant my non-bloomers in the Fall. They had been dug up in the summer and stored and planted late October.
    "If I keep a green bough in my heart, a singing bird will come"




  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Posts
    598
    If they were mine I would treat the pot as if it were a potted annual and make a planting hole the size of the pot and plant them now. If they die back, or continue to grow, they probably will not bloom next spring. But sooner or later they will have to get acclimated to the seasons and your soil.
    Tom W
    Aching Back Farm

+ Reply to Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts