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Thread: Cleyera

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
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    598

    Cleyera

    I've got about 75 of these that are 1 year old, in 1 gal pots. Today I noticed that the leaves are starting to get a bit pail, and you can see the dark veins in them. This is an evergreen plant here in the deep south, and if there is something terminal that is happening I would like to get a diagnosis and fix for it.

    Anyone grow these, or have a recommendation?

    The leaves of this plant should be dark green.
    Attached Images  
    Tom W
    Aching Back Farm

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
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    Central Indiana Zone 5a
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    Tom,

    I got this from the Master Gardener Site:
    http://www.lsuagcenter.com/subjects/...br/mgshcle.htm

    Same information on this page:

    http://www.desert-tropicals.com/Plan...emia_gymn.html

    You may find something useful here:

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/q...&dopt=Abstract

    This is from Google, a link to a PDF file:

    PDF] Ternstroemia gymnanthera
    File Format: PDF/Adobe Acrobat - View as HTML
    ... Current year stem/twig thickness: thin Culture Light requirement ... Pest problems are
    rare on cleyera with scale being ... Pests and Diseases No diseases are of major ...
    hort.ifas.ufl.edu/shrubs/TERGYMA.PDF

    http://hort.ifas.ufl.edu/shrubs/TERGYMA.PDF


    Hope somthing here helps you.


    Rebecca
    Nature is trying very hard to make us succeed, but nature does not depend on us. We are not the only experiment.
    - R. Buckminster Fuller

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Zone 9a - Gulf Coast
    Posts
    9,934
    Tom,

    I haven't tried these. My neighbor has a row of tri-colored ones, and I am anxious to try them, but life as of late means I am still trying to recoup from being a new teacher at an inner city school and Ivan.

    Cleyera is a common plant here, and they do well which must mean that they like acidic soils which we definitely have.

    I don't know what to say except that they must be lacking in something. I don't know what it is, and perhaps just planting them in the ground will help them to overcome what they lack.

    Sometimes, the potting soil we use is not enough like the normal environment in which they thrive. I am unaware of any special requirements for Cleyera. I just know they tend to thrive here in acidic soil with lots of rain and even during a drought.

    They are like azaleas and camellias. They just do well here. Perhaps you might compare the soils of those and try to accomodate.

    I don't know what other advise to give since so little information is available on them.

    Pretty plant. Tom, you would really like the tri-colored ones. Do a search on 'cleyera' on Landspro, and you will find some pics of my neighbor's.

    Enjoy and let me know what you find out...
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Posts
    598

    I think they got well?

    Thanks Ladies,

    Thanks Rebecca for the links, at least they told me that I could quit fretting over some of the things I'd speculated about.

    Yes, Ann, they do like acid soil, and for that reason alone I gave them a shot of Aluminum Sulfate and Epsom Salts, because they looked to be suffering from lack of Iron and magnesium. I don't think that hurt them, but it also didn't do a complete fix. You really should try some, they are easy, but slow.

    However, after weeks of worry, that didn't seem to fix them. Here is what I think happened:

    They had been growing in just partial sun and I moved them. Their new home was sitting on Black Plastic, in Black pots, in the Southern August Sun. They didn't seem to wilt, they hardly ever do. But, to compensate for the new hotter, dryer location, I started to water them more often - mistake. These plants were just getting large enough for 3 quart pots, and had not yet begun to fill them with roots, so the water uptake was not nearly as much as I thought.

    The next batch will remain in partial shade, along with all the others that I do, unless someone can suggest a cheap white ground cover, or something that will not collect the heat so much. The ground cover is there to block the weeds, and their seeds from causing a hassle.
    Tom W
    Aching Back Farm

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Kirbyville,Texas
    Posts
    156
    Tom
    I too grow these cleyera mine are from cuttings also two years ago I took cuttings and rooted them they grew 1 foot tall I cut back several times. I can not get them to bush out. After visiting a grower he showed me his. He said they were from cutting and couldn't get his to bush out also. He said he made the same mistake as I you have to have a female and a male mother plants and plant the seeds not the cuttings. I would like to hear your comment on this.
    Eugene
    Gene

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Posts
    598
    Gene,

    You have seen the former posts indicating that these plants like acid soil. I have also discovered that they prefer full sun.

    I don't know if mine are as bushed out as you would like, but I am happy with that aspect. I'll give you a picture later, for your comparison. Too much shade will cause elongation of the stems, extra sun will cause the plant to produce side shoots to protect the stem.

    My "comment" on "seeds" is this: If you are able to clone a plant by cutting, the new plant is identical to the source and under the right conditions, will perform the same way. Seed propagation is the method least apt to produce genetically identical plants. The plant in this picture has never been prunned or had it's terminal buds removed.
    Attached Images  
    Tom W
    Aching Back Farm

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Kirbyville,Texas
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    156
    Tom

    Yours look a heck of a lot better than mine. I think you got a point mine are under a big shade tree thinking this would be easier on the young plants,plus keep them cooler. I know what you mean about the black plastic getting hot and then the black pots bake there roots. The cutting I took last year are in the greenhouse under shade cloth,(less shade than the shade tree) and seem to be doing better although I have top them twice. I will move the ones out from under the tree in light shade than to full sun and will study these weekly. I too felt the same with tip cutting should be the same as there mother, compared to the seeds. But I was going on his knowledge. Thanks
    Gene

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Posts
    598
    Gene,

    If you have the option, try moving your plants to the eastern side of the tree. The afternoon sun plus the hot weather may be too much for them. That way they will get lots of morning sun, and a little heat relief late in the day. Keep a close watch on them for the next few weeks. They will need a bit more water out in the sun. Hang in there with them, they are really slow growers.
    Tom W
    Aching Back Farm

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Kirbyville,Texas
    Posts
    156
    Thanks Tom Will do
    Gene

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