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Thread: Amaryllis, Again

  1. #1
    Join Date
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    Amaryllis, Again

    Neglected to mention in my previous post that 'Promise' made a pup last season. So you might want to rethink slicing that one up! At least until you're sure it isn't going to produce pups.

    Elvas is a grand amaryllis, with huge blooms and sturdy stems, but it doesn't like cold feet! I very nearly lost mine when it was first planted last year. I was fortunate to catch it in time and it grew in size over the summer. The bulb is almost the size of a grapefruit now!

    From what I have read, the doubles are very difficult to breed, having some of the same problems the double flowered daylilies have. Another thing I have read is that since hipps have been bred for hundreds of years there is aways a lot of variety in the offspring. One of the Tinker's Forum members, who lives in South Georgia has dabbled with crossing his plants and there is a very good thread about it you might want to check out. Key word "AMARYLLIS" for the search. He is able to grow his amaryllis in the ground, year round!

    Not an amaryllis but somewhat related is the Kafir Lily. Mine didn't bloom this year as it was still mothering fruits. I have been able to plant several of the seeds and some have already begun to sprout. They will be good sized seedlings by spring and I will have several to share. It takes them quite a while to reach bloom size, but the wait is always worth it!

    All for now,

    Rebecca

  2. #2
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    Yesterday evening while I was watering the plants in the basement and cleaning up the dead foliage from the Amaryllis I notice 'Promise' was developing two (2) new pups! I have not had the doubles do that before, in fact, 'Promise' is the only double that has produced any pups at all!

    Since 'Promise' is planted in a fairly large pot, these will remain with the mother bulb at least until after they bloom for the first time. It also means 'Promise' will be kept growing through the winter and be getting some supplemental feedings as long as it is in active growth.

    I hope to get back to the basement growing area Sunday to do some more work and get more of the plants into better lighting.

    Some of the Lantana are loosing their leaves as are several of the tropical hibiscus, all of the big ones are and a couple of the seedlings as well. All of the mature plants also have buds nearly ready to open, but I may have to sacrifice them to keep the plants alive and healthy through the winter. The mature plants all need a good, hard pruning as they are losing their shape and the three smaller ones should be re-planted, but that can wait until Spring, thankfully. Still need to hang three additional lights on the growing stand and then I'll be able to bring the late summer daylily seedlings inside for the winter. Plus a few of the smaller divisions that the squirrel just won't leave alone!

    Hope everyone has a great Friday!


    Rebecca

  3. #3
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    Aug 2001
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    Rebecca,

    I read the thread on Tinkers, and now that life is settling down just a little (Quarter 1 ended yesterday after being delayed by Ivan), I hope to share what I have learned with them.

    I have tried floating the seed in water, and it didn't work for me. That may have something to do with my water being from the well, but I think it is simply my lack of consistency in changing out the water often enough and being patient.

    This method has proven to work best for me, so I will continue to use it... http://www.landspro.com/page8.htm

    It is so easy and the seedlings can stay in the ziplock bag for a long, long time, until I get a chance to plant them.

    I want to try to plant some of them in the ground. My bulb cuttings are getting fairly large now, and I know that they made it through the winter outside in pots with little or no protection last year, but I must note that it was a mild winter. I haven't made up my mind as to whether I will chance that again next year. I still have to replace the leanto that was demolished by the old pecan tree.

    The problem is that I cannot even begin to rebuild until they fix the roof and replace the siding on that side of the house. When they fix it, they will have to demolish the crushed plywood and eaves and that would come crashing on the leanto. Also, they would have to remove the leanto to replace all of the siding.

    I have about a month, but we are still waiting on the contractor. They are all so busy due to the devastation, especially in Pensacola.

    Back to the Amaryllis bulb cutting... It is usually quite easy and successful, but you do have to use a fungicide. I use Captan. It works best if they are dormant and dried somewhat. Otherwise, there is a milky like substance that oozes from the cuttings and that is where bacteria and fungus starts.

    Just to be on the safe side, though, I like to keep one whole one intact and let it go to seed if possible.

    You are very correct about the doubles. They do not have a well formed reproductive system. Pollen is present, but not in the abundance that the singles have.

    Amaryllis is one of my many plant passions! I love all kinds of bulbs, so it is hard to say which is my favorite, but Amaryllis has got to be on the top somewhere.
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  4. #4
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    Help. I have an amaryllis that I bought about 3 yrs. ago. It bloomed that first year. Never again. It has been growing all summer. Do I have any hopes of it blooming this year? What do I need to do to it?
    It is so nice to have pros to ask. This is the first one I've ever had and I'd love to see it bloom again.
    tennessee sue

  5. #5
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    Sue,

    If the bulb has grown at least 7 new leaves this season and increased in size, it could possibly bloom for you this winter.

    You will need to decrease the amount of water you give it and keep it on the dry side. If the foliage all dies back, that's okay. The bulb will go dormant and should be kept cool and given only enough water so the soil doesn't dry out completely.

    After allowing the bulb to rest in a cool, dark place for 6 to 8 weeks, re-pot the bulb in the next size larger pot (preferably clay) and soak the newly potted "plant" in warm water to which you have added fertilizer (at the recommended rate), and let it soak for several hours. Remove the potted bulb and allow it to drain completely before placing it in a bright, warm spot away from cold drafts. Do not water again until new growth has begun.

    In the event your bulb doesn't bloom, continue to water and feed it until it can be placed in a shady spot in the garden after all danger of frost has past. Be diligent about keeping the plant well watered during the summer growing season and apply a balance fertilizer at least once each month. A Blossom Booster Formula can be used instead (high middle number).

    It take amaryllis a full 18 months to develop buds, a good 12 of those months the buds are held as embryonic bloom buds deep in the heart of the bulb. Any bloom you could get this winter would have been formed during last season's growing season.

    Some things that I have noticed over the years :

    1. Amaryllis grow better in larger pots (8-inches), there's more room for root development and more roots mean more foliage which equates to larger bulbs and BLOOMS!

    2. Amaryllis like the company of others! I regularly plant several bulbs (all the same or all different) in one large pot/tub (14-inch). I also leave the bulblets with the mother bulb until they get too crowded or have someone to share a bulb with.

    3. Amaryllis are water hogs and heavy feeders - during the growing season! But, they don't like to be water-logged, so good drainage is very important!

    4. Last but not least, they have a mind of their own, When grown really well they will bloom, but in their own sweet time, when they want to! I have had them bloom in mid winter, early spring and in late summer. All have been bulbs that originally bloomed for Christmas (treated bulbs). When left to their own devises, they find their true season.

    Good Luck!

    Rebecca
    Nature is trying very hard to make us succeed, but nature does not depend on us. We are not the only experiment.
    - R. Buckminster Fuller

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