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Thread: Double Pink

  1. #1

    Double Pink

    I know I am going nuts with the new camera but will not hog too much space}
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  2. #2
    Join Date
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    WOW! What a lovely double pink! I want one! Can I get you to start a cutting for me? Trade ya! How about this one:




    PM me and let me know. Mine's ready now, but we can wait until Spring. I also have a pink single 'Seminole' that's very nice.

    Rebecca

  3. #3

    cutting

    If I can organize some room somewhere to have some cuttings startedI will try to get some

  4. #4
    Join Date
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    Works for me!

    I have found that I get better results starting cutting in the Spring. All I do it make a clean cut at least 6-inches long from a growing tip - pinnings work really well - dip the cut end in rooting powder and insert in a 5-inch pot of moist potting mix. Keep it moist and (if outside) somewhat shaded, or (if indoors) in the brightest light available.

    My three biggest ones will have to be pruned back before I bring them in this Fall or they won't fit in the winter quarters.

    The Salmon Double is a "Standard" approximately 4.5-feet tall and 2.5 to 3-feet wide; 'Seminole' is a good four feet tall and 3- feet wide; my double dark rose pink is 5 to 5.5-feet tall and nearly as wide. I started it from a cutting over twenty tears ago! I also have a single red that was a rescue from the dumpster about three years ago. It had to be severely cut back when I brought it home due to broken stems and branches, It recuperated quite nicely. Next Spring will be it's turn to be re-potted. I also have eight seedlings I've been growing from a cross I made three years ago. I'm still waiting for their first blooms. Several of them are being grown and trained as "Standards" and most are 4-feet tall. I really like the Tropical Hibiscus, just wish I had more space to grow them to their full size. They really do make an impressive flowering shrub in the frost free states! They'll get quite large in a greenhouse as well, if you let them!

    Okay, I've rambled on long enough!

    Rebecca
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    Nature is trying very hard to make us succeed, but nature does not depend on us. We are not the only experiment.
    - R. Buckminster Fuller

  5. #5

    cool

    I am impressed with the cross attempt..something I haven't tried yet...I have always been a trop freak but been discouraged here in zone 5..have lost a few trying to overwinter them...might try to just take as many cuttings as possible and let the big ones go
    ;0(

  6. #6

    wow your daylilies ar great

    are they all from seed...are they hard to start..oh no I think I feel new obsession coming on!

  7. #7
    Join Date
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    All of my big plants are from cuttings, I assume. I know for certain that two are because I have grown them and gave the "parent" plants away.

    I winter my Trops in the basement under lights. Before I had a basement I wintered them over in a east-facing window in a cool room. Most trops can not take temps below 45 degrees/

    Will write about growing from seed this evening. Will give you a clue, it ain't all that difficult!

    Rebecca

    Well, duh! I just realized you were asking about my daylilies, and not the hibiscus, er, well, I think you were. As for the daylilies, the named cultivars, or perhaps I should say the registered hybrids came as divisions, the "seedlings" on the other hand, have been grown from seed. Some of these seeds were the results of my own hybridizing attempts, and a good many came from other hybridizers. Daylilies are relatively easy to grow from seed. If you'll check out the Daylily Forum you can find a thread on growing from seed under "lights". Several Landspro Members are growing daylilies from seed and most are even trying their hand at hybridizing. It can be very rewarding, but it will also try your patients! It normally takes two year from the time the seeds are put down until the first flowers are produced. Just like human infants, the blooms do evolve as the plants mature, and not only in the first bloom season but in the next one as well. After that improvements may still occur, but they aren't as dramatic as between first and second year blooms.

    Hibiscus, are not quite so easy, but if you ever are able to get a bloom to set seed and to hold the pod until the seeds mature and can be harvested, they aren't to difficult to get to sprout and to grow. They do take considerable more care than a daylily and, apparently a lot longer until they flower for the first time! My baby Hibs are nearly three years old now and are not showing any signs of blooming any time soon. Maybe next summer.

    Rebecca, again!
    Nature is trying very hard to make us succeed, but nature does not depend on us. We are not the only experiment.
    - R. Buckminster Fuller

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
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    Zone 9a - Gulf Coast
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    Those are excellent choices, Randy!

    I only wish they were hardy here, and even the hardy ones take a while to get back to a blooming size after dieing to the ground.

    What a joy when they do, though!!!!
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


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