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Thread: Lantana

  1. #1
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    Lantana


    Lantanas are one of my favorite small woody shrubs! Of course, up North where I am, they are not hardy, but they are easily carried over inside. A sunny window works well or a basement light garden, which is were mine spend the winter months.

    I have them in solid yellow, solid lavender, pink, white, burgundy, 'Dallas Red' and 'Confetti'. I've started several of the lavenders from cuttings this summer. Oh! and I also have one with variegated foliage, it is in the officew light garden (for now, at least)

    Lantana are easy from cuttings if the cuttings come from actively growing plants. They will eventually take root if made from plants that are "resting". All I do is snip off 4 to 6-inches of a branch, strip the lower leaves off, dip the end in rooting powder and insert in a pot of moistened potting mix. I keep the mix moist at all times and before long the cutting will either break new growth or bloom. They can also be rooted in water, but I have found that rooting in potting mix actually works better.








    Rebecca
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    Nature is trying very hard to make us succeed, but nature does not depend on us. We are not the only experiment.
    - R. Buckminster Fuller

  2. #2
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    Lantana 'Confetti'
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    Nature is trying very hard to make us succeed, but nature does not depend on us. We are not the only experiment.
    - R. Buckminster Fuller

  3. #3
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    Here's the Variegated Lantana:
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    Nature is trying very hard to make us succeed, but nature does not depend on us. We are not the only experiment.
    - R. Buckminster Fuller

  4. #4
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    Rebecca, I sure do like that variegated lantana! Thanks so much for sharing these plants.

    Sandi
    Sandi
    SE PA, zone 6b

  5. #5
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    Very nice plants, and beautiful photography, too.
    John_NY
    USDA Zone 6/7
    Sunset Zone 34

  6. #6
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    Just got back from Home Depot(looking for chicken wire at lunch time). Ran across Lantana with seeds ! Of course, I liberated them. The question is are they viable. They are black wrinkly some shiny black some more cloudy black. What do you think ?
    "If I keep a green bough in my heart, a singing bird will come"




  7. #7
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    Only one way to find out, plant them and see what happens! The berries do turn deep purple to black when ripe and lose the luster as they dry. I pick seeds off of mine all the time, usually while they are still green, but sometimes I do leave them until they mature. I have some planted now, but nothing has come up yet. I have two pots with seeds sown in them, can't remember who is who though! Both have something sprouted, but can't tell yet what it is, probably weed seeds! One of the pots does have seeds I saved from my pink Lantana.

    I'll let y'all know what happens.

    Rebecca
    Nature is trying very hard to make us succeed, but nature does not depend on us. We are not the only experiment.
    - R. Buckminster Fuller

  8. #8
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    I truly think that the prettiest one is the one that is invasive here, Lantana Camara. It produces lots and lots of seeds. I agree with Rebecca in that if the seeds are plump and black or black and crinkled, they are most likely viable.

    I have the ones that Rebecca mentioned. The dark orange and yellow in the September blooms thread came up by itself and was probably a cross between Lantana Camara and a red one which is still in pots. If no other forms of Lantana are around, they generally will produce the same type flower with a mixture of pastel-like pinks, lavenders, yellows, etc.

    Rebecca, are any of your reds pure red or do they have a yellow center? I would love to have a pure red. I think that if someone could hybridize a trailing pure red, they would have a fortune on their hands. My trailing lavender is quite hardy here and spreads a little too fast. The trailing yellow and white have not done quite as much spreading.

    I like them all!
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  9. #9
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    The seeds are soft--should they be ?

    I also took a bunch of cuttings from the ones at work--got a variegated leafed one too. Do you take green or woody stem ? (I took green).
    Last edited by Dazed_Lily; 09-24-2004 at 05:58 PM.
    "If I keep a green bough in my heart, a singing bird will come"




  10. #10
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    The seed pods should be, but open them and see if you don't see smaller hard seeds inside... If I remember correctly, there should be. Memory also tells me that they are about the size of a blackberry seed.

    Rebecca can probably tell you more because I do not purposefully grow these from seeds. The birds do a good job of that.

    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  11. #11
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    My goodness..you are right. I peeled off the outer jacket and found a harder seed inside. I'm assuming I should stop there ?
    Should I shuck all my seeds like that ? Here I count on the birds to supply me with Eastern Red Cedars !

    "If I keep a green bough in my heart, a singing bird will come"




  12. #12
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    The "pods" you see on the Lantana are actually FRUIT! Which is why the birds love them! Each fertilized bloom will produce one berry but together they do look a lot like a blackberry.

    I haven't done any research on growing Lantana from seed, but since they are a tropical plant I doubt they would require stratification in order to sprout, a 24 hour soak should be enough to soften the seed coat. Even with that, it may take several days to several weeks for all the seeds to germinate. Lantana, like most other flowering plants that have been hybridized, aren't very likely to bloom true from seed.

    As for cuttings, most of mine have been a combination of "green" and hard wood. Roots tend to form at the base of the cutting and not from the leaf nodes, at least not right away. Bright, indirect light constant, even moisture and somewhat warm temperatures produce the quickest results. I always use rooting powder on them as well.

    I do believe I need to do some research on growing these from seed and possibly hybridizing.

    Rebecca
    Nature is trying very hard to make us succeed, but nature does not depend on us. We are not the only experiment.
    - R. Buckminster Fuller

  13. #13
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    Since I'm about to give my Lantana seeds away I just want to make sure that they should be sown in early Spring versus now , right ? (And I did read , as Rebecca suggested, to soak for 24 hours before planting).
    Thanks,Cathy
    "If I keep a green bough in my heart, a singing bird will come"




  14. #14
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    Germination is better when the seed is fresh, so I wouldn't put off sowing them too long and do keep them in the fridge.

    My research indicates that they are fairly easy, though poor % of germination. Soak for 24 hours and then sprout with bottom heat.

    In a different article it stated that the fruits should be left on the plants until they dried out, but I doubt if that is really necessary. I would simply pop the seed from the fruit and soak the seed prior to planting. A little Hydrogen peroxide in the soak water should kill off any mold or fungus spores. Cover the seeds at a depth that is equal to the diameter of the seed. Keep soil moist but not soggy and wait!

    I have two pots with a single plant growing in each. Both have quite a few seeds sown in them, so, either germination is really poor or something else has decided to grow in these pots - my luck it's Mulberry trees! Time will tell!

    Rebecca

  15. #15
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    They will be planted outdoors Zone 6;so, should they get planted now or in the spring ? Thanks.
    "If I keep a green bough in my heart, a singing bird will come"




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