+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 12 of 12

Thread: Any one propagating this shrub

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Posts
    443

    Any one propagating this shrub

    Crepe myrtle.
    let us know how your doing?
    shepp zone5/6

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Posts
    598
    Hardness zone 7-9. Where temps go below about -5 to -10, they are considered a herbaceous perennial, because the tops freeze back nearly every winter.

    Easy to propagate with new growth cuttings here in zone 7 during june-Aug. Treated with 1000 PPM IBA and mist, they will develop roots in just 3-4 weeks. Early rooted plants will continue to grow until near frost.

    There are three different size categories: SEMI-DWARF (5-12'), Intermediate (13-20') and TREE-TYPE (23-33'). There are many different colors, and are approaching "Over use" status in the landscapes here (my opinion).
    Tom W
    Aching Back Farm

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Zone 9a - Gulf Coast
    Posts
    9,934
    Shepp,

    The well manicured tree form is absolutely gorgeous.

    Tom is right on target when he says they are being over planted here. They are everwhere. Not so much in home and business landscape as much as on the sides and medians of the streets.

    As to hardiness, Park Seed claims that their dwarf form is hardy to zone 6. One word of caution, though. It is often spelled 'Crape' rather than Crepe, and you will have to use that spelling to search for the seeds on Park's web site.

    I purchased some of their seed. At the time, they stated that they bloomed in a couple of months from seed. Indeed, they did do that. I am not sure why they no longer include that in the description.

    Here is a picture of my favorite from those seeds. It is lavender. The limbs are weighted down a bit due to a heavy rain last night. They should lift back up later today.

    It is not in full bloom, yet, but will be in the next week or so! The blooms last a few weeks, at least...
    Attached Images  
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Zone 9a - Gulf Coast
    Posts
    9,934
    Here is a closeup of the flower buds. They look like little berries. The seed pods will also look like this until they dry and open. They produce lots and lots of winged seeds which will not necessarily come true to color.

    Crepe Myrtle are easy to propagate from semi-hardwood stem cuttings. They will also grow from root cuttings.

    Every time my neighbor digs up a sucker, I think three or four more grow from the roots! LAS! I am serious!!!! They are forever digging them up and giving them away.

    They gave me one that looked like a dead stem with a dead root. It is now 10 foot tall and in need of a 'manicure'.

    Here is the closeup...
    Attached Images  
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Wichita,Kansas
    Posts
    3,680
    Blog Entries
    2
    I love that first photo with the downward looking aspect; it almost has motion to it.
    When is the appropriate time to do these semi-hardwood cuttings ? And is it too late to start seeds from last year ?
    Thanks !
    "If I keep a green bough in my heart, a singing bird will come"




  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Zone 9a - Gulf Coast
    Posts
    9,934
    Right now will do just fine, Cathy, as long as it is semi-hardwood and not limber new growth. You may need a plastic tent or mist for the latter.

    It's always a good idea to remove the flowers and buds so that energy is spent on rooting rather than producing seeds. Use rooting hormone and keep the potted cutting in shade until it is well rooted.

    If it is a thick, hardened branch, you can slit the bottom vertically about an inch or two. That seems to help...
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Zone 9a - Gulf Coast
    Posts
    9,934
    Okay, here is my poor little crepe myrtle in dire need of a manicure. This is the one that was once a dead looking stick. It is not in full bloom, and I hate to cut off blooms but I need to...

    Look at the smaller stems/branches coming from the base. Those are the ones that need to be pruned.
    Attached Images  
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Zone 9a - Gulf Coast
    Posts
    9,934
    This is a closeup of the base. It shows how the new shoots form to create a multiple trunk.

    The largest one was the original 'stick'. You can see how the bark peels leaving a pretty, smooth trunk. Obviously, those new little shoots are easier to prune when they are tiny, like the little one that you see.
    Attached Images  
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Zone 9a - Gulf Coast
    Posts
    9,934
    I call this one hot pink. I didn't know what color it was when she gave it to me.

    I have a dwarf one that is fully grown which is the same color. It was also grown from Park's seed.

    Here is the color of the bloom....
    Attached Images  
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Zone 9a - Gulf Coast
    Posts
    9,934
    Here is another color that I truly like. Unfornuately, it is pretty up close, but not as pretty further away.
    Attached Images  
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Western Michigan near Muskegon
    Posts
    1,462
    Ann,
    I truly LOVE that hot pink color. I have tall garden phlox that is about that color. I plant baskets with wave petunias that color, and impatiens too. They hang around my pergola.
    So my summer color scheme is hot pink, mostly.
    I would love a couple of the dwarf ones. I don't see them planted here. Maybe I can trade for a couple. That thought always goes through my mind when I see something I'd like. Signs of addiction I'm told.
    Happy Growing,
    Vicki in West. Mich.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Posts
    443

    thanks Ann ,Tom

    i was afraid of that info.
    possibly may still try them since i am on the edge of zone 6.
    and are herbaceous.
    i know nikko blue hydrangea doesnt do well being herbaceous
    around here. but some do and some dont ,its back to the microclimates again in ones yard.
    shepp zone5/6

+ Reply to Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts