+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: Fruit trees- Which is Best:Plant in Spring or Fall

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Wichita,Kansas
    Posts
    3,680
    Blog Entries
    2

    Fruit trees- Which is Best:Plant in Spring or Fall ?

    We bought and planted an dwarf almond tree a month and a half ago. It has been slow going coming out of dormancy(which actually was best on several cold days) and is starting to make small leaves. Inspired, we are now considering an dwarf apricot and a plum tree but are not sure if fall is better for planting. Right now we are on the cusp of hot weather. In the fall we are on the cusp of cold weather(although the hot wether can last into September). I'm in Zone 6 Wichita KS. I would appreciate advice on whether it is better to order and plant now or order and plant in late September/early October.
    Thanks,Cathy
    "If I keep a green bough in my heart, a singing bird will come"




  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Surrey, BC, Canada
    Posts
    221

    Fall planting

    Cathy--I think this is a good question, that may be answered like many things by people who have passed down info for generations...right or wrong.

    I seem to have read about root growth in fall being quite limited, but couldn't track down the source. Do trees really root out in the fall while their leaves are senescing, then falling, and top growth has stopped? It sounds like a good time, and has been popular here on the west coast where fall is very long and gradually morphs into winter.

    Areas with more defined seasons may not have much time between the warmth of summer and the first few hard frosts that could end growth of any sort...there the spring planting season is more definitely the better choice.

    How about Kansas...gradual changes of seasons, or quite sudden?

    Another part of the subject...could you get much planting material ordering now, it seems rather late. I guess potted trees are available throughout the summer, actually. I like bareroot trees if possible, cheaper and excellent establishment if they are cared for properly and planted immediately on receipt. Much better than anything potbound, tho most fruit trees in pots are just bareroot stuff that has been potted up a few months, or days, before...which we get to pay extra for.

    The only time I can get bareroot trees here is usually March, so that settles the question of when to plant for those!

    Hopefully someone has more definite info on this topic...I think the guy who does the Rootmaker pots has researched all the root growth deal to death...maybe I can find something from his site.

    Later,
    Glen

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Posts
    598

    First things first.

    Stop by your local County Extension Office and pick up handouts on fruit tree selection, pruning, and commercial growing. There are a wide range of fruit and nut trees that will do well in your zone, that have the exact "cold days" for your area.

    Most fruit trees are distributed bare root in the late winter or early spring with the roots protected from drying. I have never had one fail when planted during that season by simply following the recommended steps.

    One of the major steps in planting for production is pruning. The creation of the basic shape is done in the first few years of the trees life. Also, be sure to consider the mature size of the tree when selecting location.

    While potted trees can be set out in any season, the root system is restricted in pots, and the rapid growth period puts more demand on them while they are trying to get established. The advantage to potted plants is, they are ready when you are.
    Last edited by Tom; 05-24-2004 at 07:03 AM.
    Tom W
    Aching Back Farm

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Wichita,Kansas
    Posts
    3,680
    Blog Entries
    2
    Thank you both. Here’s an interesting tidbit that just might point to some answers. Kansas was named after the Kansa Indians; Kansa means “People of the South Winds”. All my trees are bent to the north, so that must be true ! In summer we get hot drying winds sweeping up from the south. I spoke to a Master Gardener at the Ext Office. Bless her heart ,she is a rosarian and often spoke in terms of roses but the message might be applicable regardless. She said it is too hot and drying right now to plant roses and they should be planted early spring. She seemed to be advocating field grown fruit trees over bare root right now. I guess I could maybe see that if it's been growing here(in a pot or a burlap bag in the field ?) there is less shock(but not if they have to dig it up now). But then again I thought bare root(as long as dormant) is OK. Actually I had read that planting during initial growth is the kiss of death. I’m going to call a nursery or two as well as the (catalog)fruit tree company(in Missouri) and see what I can glean. She also pointed out how many local nurseries are currently discounting their tree stock to ‘get it out of there’. Hmmmm. Much to ponder…..
    Last edited by Dazed_Lily; 05-24-2004 at 09:27 AM.
    "If I keep a green bough in my heart, a singing bird will come"




+ Reply to Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts