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Thread: peach trees

  1. #1

    peach trees

    I would like to plant a couple peach trees maybe a plum ..and some seedless grapes here in zone 5 and suggestions on varieties? thanx

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Surrey, BC, Canada
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    221

    Peaches

    Good luck, telecaster! Depending on your climate, it could be a breeze, or a fight for you.

    Here on the west coast, peaches are a fight, mostly because of leaf curl. I tried one of the varieties from Harrow Expt. Station in Ontario, but it gradually declined for me here. Disease resistance is a biggie for us, but maybe not for you. Hardiness is probably important there.

    I just planted a Redhaven last spring, and its a nice size now. If only the finches wouldn't munch off every flower bud...ah, nature :-)

    I see a wonderful selection on this nursery site
    http://www.acnursery.com/peaches.htm
    Maybe some ideas there. Often a good local garden center will stock suitable varieties, but then sometimes absolutely not. You've been in the biz long enough to know that.

    Definitely worth all the hassle when you bite into your own tree ripe peach!!!

    Glen

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
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    Zone 9a - Gulf Coast
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    Peaches tend to have disease problems here as well, but there is a home not far from me that has a grove of them, so I know that some varieties are resistant.

    Plums do great here. My neighbor has a tree that produces more than any 5 families can possibly eat, despite the fact that they are smaller than those you get at the grocery store.

    I haven't had luck with the seedless grapes or Concord Grape, but my Golden Suppernongs produce more than 10 families can eat, despite the fact that I have never pruned them. You just have to make sure you pick them before the birds take them all.

    I agree with Glenn. Check around.... You might want to find out who is growing them in your area and perhaps they will tell you what kind.

    Just beware that all fruit and nut trees take awhile before they are old enough to produce significant quantities. I am sure the same holds true for grapes.

    Have FUN!
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
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    Going dwarf should speed up the time to bear. I just went through 'analysis paralysis' with selecting a peach tree. Well, I still don't have one, so what does that tell you-LOL!
    We ran into a sale at HD and were about to choose a Loring(because it looked the best) but then started to wonder is it self-fruitful ? when does it bear ? We went home empty handed and I read up on Lorings and found contradictory info.(on bacterial spot); hence, the analysis paralysis. Prior to that I saw a dwarf Dessert Gold at another HD and thought that was the one--only to find--as Glen said, that that would be a bad choice for here as it ripens very early--in other words our late freezes would ensure we'd never see fruit(they are better suited for AZ or NM).
    Since it's getting late to be buying and planting these things, I'd say locate some at local nurseries--do your homework quickly--and if it meets your rqts. buy it and plant it--there's really nothing to lose especially if they are on sale.
    "If I keep a green bough in my heart, a singing bird will come"




  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Bolton, Ont
    Posts
    149

    Peaches

    This is a touchy topic. I prefer the Red Havens, they grow well here. My backyard.

    I ve talked to a lot of people that have asked me if Peaches grow here. I show the trees with small fruit on the tree.

    Ive got one in the backyard and it had a few last year, still young.
    My neighbour hasnt had luck with peach. He didnt believe our tree had fruit.
    Peaches dont like to be too sheltered. Mine is the last tree away from the house.

    A lot of the Wholesalers here now bring their Peaches in cuz of Plum Pox being found in the area.

    I agree with Glen, these are sensitive trees so should be planned carefully.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Western Michigan near Muskegon
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    I know red haven peaches are successfully grown here also. I'm in zone 5, too.
    Happy Growing,
    Vicki in West. Mich.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Posts
    598
    Your County Agents office should have a list of recommended cultivars for your area. They will also have a planting guide, a pruning guide, and a recommended spray program. Get them all and follow them.

    I have planted several peach and plum trees that are recommended for zone 7, and they have grown like gang busters. This year they were all simply loaded with fruit. But, alas, things started happening around here, and I was not able to keep up with the spray program. They should be getting ripe last week and this. However, just before getting ripe, they all grew hair (a fungus of some sort) and I lost the entire crop!
    A late frost killed all the plum flowers, and I got ONE plum from 4 trees. All new apple trees have fire blight, and it looks like I may just lose them all.

    Lesson learned, lesson taught. Isn't gardening fun.
    Tom W
    Aching Back Farm

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
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    Zone 9a - Gulf Coast
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    My Canning Pear Tree

    My huge canning pear tree that I planted about 20 years ago started having black spots on the leaves last year. Nearly all of the leaves fell off early in the season. The pears were small and not worth the effort even if I had the time to can them.

    This year, the same thing happened. Black spots early in the season followed by the leaves turning yellow, then black and falling off. We tried removing the dead leaves, but more just fell.

    This is what my poor tree looks like ...
    Attached Images  
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  9. #9
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    The leaves that remain are terribly spotted, turning yellow, then black, then falling. The pears are tiny compared to the usual crop.
    Attached Images  
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  10. #10
    Join Date
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    Eating Pear Tree

    I call it an eating pear tree because the pears are very tender, soft and sweet when ripened. The pears sometimes get HUGE.

    Its leaves do not have any of these spots, but I often lose a lot of the fruit due to late frost. This year, I didn't...
    Attached Images  
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  11. #11
    Join Date
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    Since it was spared a late frost, there is more fruit and more fruit means smaller fruit. They are still BIG, though...
    Attached Images  
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
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    No late frost was good for my fig tree. It grew more this year than it has ever grown.

    (Don't mind the grass. Too much rain to mow the back fence!)
    Attached Images  
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  13. #13
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    Aug 2001
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    Every branch is loaded with figs, and I need to put a bird nest on it or the birds will eat them ALL!

    I LOVE FIGS! These are the typical Brown Turkey...
    Attached Images  
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  14. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Kentucky
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    Ann - you didn't say whether you knew or not what was affecting your pears. I didn't know off-hand, but did a search and Entomosporium leaf spot-( syn. Fabraea Leaf Spot) looks to be the cause. I'll leave a couple of links in case you are interested.

    Pear Leaf Spot1

    Pear Leaf Spot 2

    Wish I could get to those figs when they ripen. I had some right off the tree years ago on vacation to Florida and they have been a favorite since. Hope those links help!

    Brian

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
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    Zone 9a - Gulf Coast
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    Thanks, Brian!

    I hate the thought of losing this tree. It has always been a heavy producer, but has gotten too big to keep pruned. I suspect that it is now over 30 foot tall.

    If I get a chance in the next few weeks, I will take a few leaves to my friendly local cooperative extension and let the verify the problem.

    So far, it has not affected the fruit except that the fruit is smaller than usual.

    I suspect it is only a matter of time before the eating pear tree next to it has the same problem.

    Thanks, again!
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


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