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Thread: Rose Propagation Directions

  1. #1
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    Rose Propagation Directions

    I've been admiring a sprawling rose bush(maybe multiple bushes together ?) in front of a nearby bank--I mean we're talking a big wide wave of red rose blossoms. So, I'd like to do some propagating(on a Sunday ;-). I suppose the first consideration is what will I end up with if it grows--I know that they graft roeses onto stock so what might this mean to my plans before I proceed.
    Assuming it's a go, I am confused(and since I am a literal, draw me a picture kind of person, it's not hard to get confused) by the directions:

    Step 6: Cut the branches into sections, making sure to leave at least one or two leaf stems on the cutting. The sections will be about 3-6 inches depending on the size of the stem.

    What are the branches versus the stem ? Does that mean cut the stem into sections but make sure you've got some lateral leaf stems on them ?

    I think I'm headed into a propagation phase right now. I bought lots of stuff last year and some worked and some was disappointing, so I think I'll try rooting my own this year. Other things I'm eyeing: spirea, flowering quince, yellow campsis radicans, etc.

    Thanks,Cathy
    "If I keep a green bough in my heart, a singing bird will come"




  2. #2
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    Branches vs. Stems

    Cathy,

    When I refer to branches, they are usually semi-hardwood and not the brand new, softwood growth. In my mind, branches are thicker than stems, but that may not be the way others perceive it. I don't know.

    Just make sure the weather is warm. You can put quite a few cuttings in the same pot if you use a soft, soiless mix. The new roots are almost the thickness of pencil lead. Separate and repot them when they are ready. Just take care not to pull on the cuttings until they have had time to have substantial roots.

    They are really, really easy if you follow the directions. There are other methods used in the winter, but they root so fast in the summer here that I prefer the warm method.

    Good luck and be warned.... It can become addictive!

    Enjoy!
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  3. #3
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    Step 6: Cut the branches into sections, making sure to leave at least one or two leaf stems on the cutting. The sections will be about 3-6 inches depending on the size of the stem.

    What are the branches versus the stem ? Does that mean cut the stem into sections but make sure you've got some lateral leaf stems on them ?



    Cathy, you are absolutely correct, those instructions are confusing because they have used the term 'Stem' in two different ways. In the first case they are referring to the stem of a compound leaf, in the other they are referring to the entire new growth flower stem.

    Here's what:
    For purposes of this description, a "Stem" is the entire branch that one would cut for cut flowers. Any stem that has new or just finished flowers, can be rooted by following the remaining instructions. Either an entire flower stem with a heal, or sections with 2 or 3 nodes will root fairly easily.

    What you have described sounds like a running rose that is probably not grafted. You will soon know if you root some and bring them to blooming state. Like most hydrangia's, running roses make flowers on new growth that springs from last years canes, and take some special care in prunning.
    Tom W
    Aching Back Farm

  4. #4
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    Thanks, Tom!

    My brain is fried. I supposed I should fix the wording, but I know that it will not happen in the next week or two.

    I am recovering from the last days of school!

    Thanks, again!

    Have fun, Cathy! They are usually easy!
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  5. #5
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    Thank you both for the info.
    In an ironic twist, this evening I noticed a neighbor's rose bush coming through our fence bearing lovely pink flowers(much like in the pictures of the antique rose). Throwing all thought processes to the wind, I grabbed my pruning shears and cut a long stem off (with 'compound' leaves attached) and placed it in water. Then I sat down and read your replies--LOL !
    ***Is there any chance I can use that one for rooting ?(there are others, and some hard wood, available but that would have been a good one).***

    Thanks(I think I am seeing an addictive quality here)
    ;-)
    "If I keep a green bough in my heart, a singing bird will come"




  6. #6
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    Go for IT!

    Cathy,

    Remove any tiny branches/stems from the sides of the main branch/stem, and give it a try! Chances are that they will root. Just don't leave too many leaves because they tend to drain too much energy and attract fungus.

    Don't mind me if that sounds confusing. I am exhausted, but have been looking at all my beautiful old roses and thinking that I sure need to get out there soon and start some cuttings.

    Have FUN!

    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


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