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Thread: Starting amaryllis bulbs

  1. #1

    Starting amaryllis bulbs

    I received an amaryllis bulb for Christmas. In the late winter it bloomed and produced a set of seeds. I found this website while looking for how to germinate the seeds. I just wanted to say thanks for the step by step tutorial. I now have 40-50 little seedlings growing inside.
    --Hilary

  2. #2
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    Welcome to Landspro Hillary!

    You will find that once your seedlings sprout, they are extremely forgiving. It will take 2-3 years for the bulbs to get large enough to bloom, but watching them grow is a treat! They grow very fast. At first, it will seem like they aren't getting very big, but once they are about 1 inch in diameter, the growth rate will amaze you.

    Best of all, they do not take very much soil mix or space. Like I said, they are forgiving.

    Should your mother bulb decide to produce an offshoot, be sure to repot it. You can wait until the baby bulb is more than 1/2 inch in diameter. Then just carefully pull the baby bulb away from the mother, making sure that the roots and base of the baby stay as intact as possible. Don't worry if you break a few roots.

    Although I have seen them growing in water (roots in water only), they do not like to be overwatered, so feel free to let them dry out once in awhile.

    Some of my Amaryllis that were not 'forced' for Christmas are in bloom. I'll try to take a picture of these when the sun is not so bright. One of them is a garden Amaryllis that I purchased for $2. There was one mother bulb and 2 babies in the pot, but it was passed bloom, so I had no idea what color the bloom was.

    Since then, I have repotted and now have three 3 gallon pots that are crammed packed with bulbs. I finally have my first bloom stalk and they are RED. They look a lot like the Red Lion and may be just that. There is no way of telling, but the Red lion is quick to go to seed.

    I am thrilled to hear that you used my instructions and that it worked for you!

    Welcome, again to Landspro!

    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  3. #3
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    Lady Jane

    I've never been able to get this one to produce seeds....


    It is one of my favorites, the "Lady Jane" Amaryllis!
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    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  4. #4
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    White Christmas

    I haven't had this one as long...
    Attached Images  
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  5. #5
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    The "Garden" Amaryllis...

    Now I know it is RED!
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    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  6. #6
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    Congrats! Hiliary! Wat to go! Before long, if you aren't careful, you'll be addicted to amaryllis (Hippeastrums). I don't try to raise any from seeds, I get enough side bulbs as is! At last count I had 50+ blooming sized bulbs!

    I grow mine in big pots, tubs and planters and have several bulbs per container, they seem to like the company of others. The trick is in getting them to rebloom each year! Keep your "mother bulb" growing throughout the summer. Water when the top of the soil feels dry to the touch and don't forget to fertilize. Amaryllis are heavy feeders. I top dress mine with a slow release general purpose fertilizer when I put them outdoors for the summer (shady spot) and then augment that with regular application of 1/4 strength soluable plant food and fish emulsion. I would also recommend you use a dilute fertilizer on the seedlings (Miracle-Gro and 1/4 the package directions every time you water would not be too much.) I am not familiar with Ann's instructions, so I may be repeating her here, but as they seedling grow and begin to crowd each other, you'll want to move them on to larger quarters. Seed starting flats would be very good, at least until the baby bulbs get to be about quarte size, then I'd go to big pots or tubs. The more root room they have the better. The roots feed the bulb and make it grow big and fat! The babies won't need a rest until they flower for the first time. Not a forced rest though, you have time to learn all the tricks! Oh, and when they do bloom, don't be too surprised if they don't look anything like the parent ! Amaryllis have been hybridized for over one hundred years now, so even with self pollinated seeds you're likely to get a mix of colors and combinations.

    Ann, I think your "garden amaryllis" is 'Floridian'. It was developed a number of years ago for use as a landscaping plant in Southern Florida and has made it's way all over the South. As you already know, it is a very prolific increaser! BTW, great images! Wish I could grow mine outside! Getting mighty crowded in the basement light garden!

    It's very difficult for the double flowered ones to self pollinate, but you could try to hand pollinate - if all the "parts" are there (sometimes they aren't!)

    I'll attache an image of my 'White Christmas', I also have 'Christmas Gift' and 'Ludwig Dazzler', both wihtes as well.

    Rebecca
    Attached Images  
    Last edited by Rebecca; 04-17-2004 at 07:09 PM.
    Nature is trying very hard to make us succeed, but nature does not depend on us. We are not the only experiment.
    - R. Buckminster Fuller

  7. #7
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    My First Amaryllis

    Over 10 years ago, when my sister and her husband first inherited their ranch in Texas, I spotted the leaves of what looked like bulbs under a huge, old walnut tree. My sister let me dig up a few and bring them home.

    It wasn't until a year later that I saw the first bloom. I later learned that they are called Amaryllis Johnsonii, and they are quite hardy. Some say they have been known to be hardy as far north as zone 5, but most say Zone 6a.

    They produce little or no seed (in my case none) and is one of the first Amaryllis hybrids developed by a watch maker named Johnson in England around 1790 as a cross between Amaryllis vittata and Amaryllis reginae.

    My first Amaryllis.....
    Attached Images  
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  8. #8
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    Last year, my former next door friends grandson gave me 2 pots from the basement of his house. I repotted them and let them grow all summer and now I have two beautiful amaryllis, but have no idea what their names are. At first, when I saw yours, I thought they were the same as one here, but alas, they are not.
    Maybe someone will be able to put a name on this one for me:
    Attached Images  
    Tom W
    Aching Back Farm

  9. #9
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    The other on, from the same source is this plain red one that is quite large.
    Attached Images  
    Last edited by Tom; 04-18-2004 at 12:44 PM.
    Tom W
    Aching Back Farm

  10. #10
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    Tom,

    The first one is most likely 'Minerva'. The second looks like 'Red Lion', but could possibly be 'Roma'.

    I think the one below is 'Roma', but I can't be sure because someone knocked the pot over and broke the stalk. The tag was lost.

    Stange enough, the broken stalk turned yellow and dried up, but the seed pod keeps getting bigger and bigger and is bright green. It is doubtful that seeds will form, but you never know!
    Attached Images  
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  11. #11
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    Ann,

    Your "First Amaryllis", H. johnsonii, is beautiful and, not that I need any more plants, I'd love to have a start of it! I wouldn't risk testing it's hardiness here, but it would be a beautiful plant grown in a large tub where it could just do it's thing!

    Your red is a knock-out and looks like 'Red Lion'. I have it and 'Roma' and I don't recall 'Roma' having as wide a petal as RL, but we know what happens to the memory as we get older!


    Tom,

    The first image looks too red to me to be Minerva, mine always have an orangish under tone. It is simialiar to 'The Clown', but has less white than what I have sen in on-line images of that one. It could be that they aren't even nammed varieties as many times the amaryllis used as gift plants are not named cultivars, but every bit as good (if not better!). None the less, they are beautiful and you have done a grand job growing them and getting them to rebloom.

    It's been grand seeing everyone else images of their amaryllis, keep them coming!


    Rebecca
    Last edited by Rebecca; 04-18-2004 at 02:54 PM.
    Nature is trying very hard to make us succeed, but nature does not depend on us. We are not the only experiment.
    - R. Buckminster Fuller

  12. #12
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    Rebecca and Tom,

    I reached under the cabinet in the patio and found the 'Red Lion' tag! So, Red Lion, it is.

    Also, my Minerva were that red, but my 'The Clown' had much more white in it, but then again, I am getting CRS also. I was hoping to get pics of them all this year, but it will have to wait until next year. Hopefully, they will all bloom again.

    Minerva produces lots and lots of seeds, especially if they are hand pollinated. And, Rebecca, I tried the 'baggie' method in a paper towel with these, and was surprised at how well they did. Some people say 'float them in water', but I was never able to get that to work. It may be my well water that prevents it from working.

    Both 'Minerva' and 'Red Lion' are heavily marketed down here before Christmas, so I wouldn't be at all surprised if that is what you have, Tom.

    There are others, but you don't see as many of them, like Promise, Elvis, Apple Blossom, Philadelphia, Lady Jane (I am going from memory, CRS) and many others if you keep your eyes open. I am escpecially fond of the large doubles, but they simply will not produce seed for me, so until they multiply on their own, I won't chance cutting them into sections.

    I will be dividing a few this year, and if the pup survives, Mama will multiplly!

    Rebecca, I owe you and Tom both something, so a Johnsonii, it will be! And Cathy, I haven't forgetten your seeds. The box is getting more and more full!


    Have FUN!
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  13. #13
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    Not to be a 'name dropper', but here are the cultivars I have - that I can remember! Good old CRS, it gets us all eventually!
    [list=1][*]Appleblossom[*]The Clown[*]Minerva[*]Roma[*]Red Lion[*]Rilona[*]White Christmas[*]Christmas Gift[*]Ludwig Dazzler[*]Promise[*]Jady Jane[*]Nymph[*]Elvas[*]Flower Record[*]Susan[/list=1]

    I may also still have 'Orange Sovereign' and 'Picotee', but I haven't had them rebloom in years. Of course that doesn't mean they are here, they may have just shrunk and are still "growing up". Oh! And how could I forget 'Papilon'! I had a 'Green Goddess' at one time but nearly lost the bulb to rot or something and have been trying to get it to grow large enough to bloom so I can re-label it's pot! There's another double flowered I have (had), but can't for the life of me remember it's name!

    Hey, being able to remember that many names out of the fifty plus amaryllis I have is quite the feat for me! Of course a lot of them are duplicates of 'Appleblossom' and 'Minerva', both are very prolific increasers. The more you take off of them the more they produce, so I quite dividing them before they took over!

    Will attach a watercolored image of 'Promise' for your drooling, oops, viewing pleasure!



    (I really love this image! It turned out so nicely!)

    Rebecca
    Last edited by Rebecca; 04-18-2004 at 03:52 PM.
    Nature is trying very hard to make us succeed, but nature does not depend on us. We are not the only experiment.
    - R. Buckminster Fuller

  14. #14
    I have a red clown amaryllis. I will post some pics later, but they are in a computer that I am currently overhauling.

    For those of us saplings, what is CRS?

    My google search produced the following off-topic results:
    Catholic Relief Services
    Stock Quotes for Carpenter Technology Corporation
    Congressional Research Service Reports
    --Hilary

  15. #15
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    Smile CRS

    Hilary,
    Hi, and welcome to Landspro.

    CRS stands for (Can't remember sh--!)
    Happy Growing,
    Vicki in West. Mich.

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