+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Seed Packets are Here!

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Zone 9a - Gulf Coast
    Posts
    9,934

    Seed Packets are Here!

    The seed packets have arrived in the stores. It seems that this happens earlier and earlier every year, and I must admit that it surely makes one ready to start sowing seeds. Or at least start planning....

    Yesterday, I harvested quite a few cross vine seeds. I was surprised to see so many considering how the late frost melted the blooms last spring. In any event, they were there, and they appear to be healthy.

    A few days before, I harvested many Toad Lily seeds. I am thinking about sowing some in the ground this year rather than flats. We will see.

    I know that I want to start more Gerbera Daisies from harvested seeds, but I need to make sure that I have a little more protected space because they may not make it otherwise.

    There are still an abundance of Rose of Sharon seeds ready to be harvested, but I am going to have to pass on that one this year.

    The birds have already started depositing Privet seeds. Oh, well... We tried to cut off as many branches as we could, but there is no way to get them all because the Privets are simply to tall.

    So tell me everyone, what seeds are you planning to grow this year?
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    northeast Tennessee
    Posts
    1,703
    Hi Ann. Happy New Year to all.
    I received a couple of packs of seed today that I had ordered. They are Gunnera manicata and a white top pitcher plant.
    The gunnera is marginally hardy here but so unusual that we had to try it.
    I've never grown any carniverous plants before but I really wanted some pitcher plants so wish me luck on that one.
    I have been reading a forum on winter sowing so I decided to try it this year. I planted 16 flats of seed last week. Some are:blue poppy (I couldn't get it to germinate otherwise), Tudor lace primula. several varieties of columbines and that's all I remember off the top of my head.
    I plan on growing from seed as many perennials as I can, some daylilies from Rebecca, and more herbs than usual,and some wildflowers. Some of the seed on my list are,
    black cohosh
    culantro (not a typo) simalar to cilantro in taste
    lemon grass
    lovage
    pleurisy root
    white and garden sage
    salad burnet
    stevia
    castor bean
    jupitor's beard
    variegated corn
    lupines
    Purple Majesty millet
    That's only the seed order I have on the computer table. Also have seeds I collected this year and seed from friends. I haven't started on my seed list from Geo yet.
    Of course I always grow the more common herbs, parsley,rosemary,thyme,basil,lots of basil,cilantro,dill,lavender,marjoram and what ever else I can find.
    I can't wait til spring. Actually I am planning on starting my seed next month for sale. That's one nice thing about winter sowing. I got to play with seed and dirt in Dec. ,no spring rush. I may do some more.
    Just a few seed I plan to plant in 2004.
    By the way, Ann, our passiflora is happily growing across the railing on our balcony. Hopefully it will bloom and set seed.
    I'll keep you posted.
    tennessee sue

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Zone 9a - Gulf Coast
    Posts
    9,934
    Sue,

    I am hoping that the passiflora that I started from fresh fruit will survive in small pots without protection, for that is what they have for now...

    Also, I have some hardy hibiscus growing from seeds that I hope will make it in small pots.

    The daylily seeds that I have started will be protected in a cool, but not freezing area. They are so very young and tiny.

    Lemon grass? It is quite popular here, if you can find it...

    Poppies, columbine and primula are not easy here.

    Pitcher plants and many carniverous plants grow quite naturally here, and I miss them. They were part of the natural habitat in my childhood years, but replaced by industry years ago.

    My Mom sold the place where we grew up on Christmas Eve, so it's going to be busy for a few months while she finds a place to live. She bought a new car, the first new car she has ever owned. I am proud for her, but do not envy her moving after over 40 years of being in one place.

    I will miss going back to the river and catching those big red fish and flounder, but gee! What can I say... When they dredged the river to make it into a ship channel, I missed being able to catch bream (blue gill) and bass.

    Simply put, I miss the wetlands where I grew up... I miss that kind of country!
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    northeast Tennessee
    Posts
    1,703
    Ann, I still have several passiflora in the greenhouse to winterover (hopefully). I am determined to have seed from them).
    I am ordering the lemongrass seed from Johnny's. I have never done it from seed before. We have several families from India here that always ask for it at the market.
    You could come up and catch all the bluegill you want here if you can beat the herons to them. There was a hugh one in the pond the other day.
    I have never seen a picture plant growing in the wild but I hope to have some for our ponds. Only a couple are hardy here.
    I am really getting into wanting everything I see to grow this year. Those catalogs are killing me. I want it all!
    Hope you and Hunter have a great new year.
    tennessee sue

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Wichita,Kansas
    Posts
    3,680
    Blog Entries
    2
    Thank you for inspiring me to ferret out my seeds. Looks like I've got:
    Red Yarrow, Mexican Hat and Purple Prairie Clover which I think I'll just all broadcast plant.

    Also, money plant, hyacinth vine, sweet pea, snapdragons, and purple salvia, and crepe myrtle walmartii. These I'll start indoors.
    Ann, don't forget your Lamb's Ears.

    I am also bound and determined to grow me a full-sized watermelon this year. There is a watermelon farmer that I pass on the way to work and he sows in March and by June you can see big 'ol watermelons in the field. I have no idea how he does it; he's got to have irrigation. I planted my seeds on the window sill where they stayed until they started to get flowers, then I put them in tubs outside. I got watermelons slightly smaller than a cataloupe for all the silly things I did to them along the way. This year I'll do it right--no containers and no babying them on a window sill!

    I'd love to hear about some of your seed starting 'setups'--particularly where do you put them and how do you address lighting and avoiding the dreaded damping off disease. I've played roulette with placing plastic over the seed trays but it seems to me if you push that just a little too long that's when damping off disease comes in. Any suggestions for a simple inexpensive setup for someone without a greenhouse ?

    Thanks,Cathy
    "If I keep a green bough in my heart, a singing bird will come"




  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    northeast Tennessee
    Posts
    1,703
    Cathy, I will tell you how I start seeds. I use 2 tables in my basement or spare room. Cover them with an electric blanket with a sheet over it (just to keep it clean). I set the flats on this and I do cover them with plastic until I have a seedling come up, then I remove the plastic from that flat. As soon as the seeds sprout in a flat I put it under shop lights. I use something (magazines) under the flats to adjust the closeness of the lights. You can use shelves with the lights hung on the bottom of the shelves. Use a chain to make it easier to adjust the light height.
    The seeds do not care if the air is cool as long as the soil is warm enough to sprout. The seedlings are fine under the lights in a cooler room. I grow them a little on the dry side and don't have much of a problem with damping off. But you do have to keep a close watch as they dry out quickly under the lights.
    I have very good luck with this set up and once you have the lights you can use them for years. Rosemary is very hard sometimes to germinate but it always germinates very well with this method. Parsley is very slow to germinate usually 3-4 weeks. It usually sprouts in 2 weeks on the electric blanket. I don't turn it up very high. After its been on for several hours just feel the soil by sticking you finger down in it to see if it feels warm.
    Thats my story and I'm sticking to it. Good luck if you try this. It really does work well for me. Now if I can get the old man to let me have the blanket off the bed. It is supposed to get down to 12 tomorrow night so I guess I can't have the blanket for a while.
    tennessee sue

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Wichita,Kansas
    Posts
    3,680
    Blog Entries
    2
    Sue- Thanks for the reply. I'll have to see if I can find a garage sale electric blanket or some heating pads !
    "If I keep a green bough in my heart, a singing bird will come"




+ Reply to Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts