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Thread: wire lock film locks

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Yelm,Washington
    Posts
    18

    wire lock film locks

    Hi;

    I need i know if the wire lock film locks will hold my green house film on?
    The wire locks seem to be the cheepest film lock,can any one give an idea of the pro's & con's of useing the wire locks to hold the film?
    John Sweaney Zone 8

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Posts
    443
    thousands of greenhouse operators wouldnt use them if they didnt work.
    personally i dont use them.i use a furring strip
    with duplex nails.
    but i dont have a hundred greenhouses or coldframes.
    wire lock and channels-
    they hold , install fast .
    when you have 100 or more greenhouses and are paying labor to cover each one , what would you use and reuse over and over again.
    especially on coldframes !

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Yelm,Washington
    Posts
    18

    thanks

    Hi;
    thanks for the input.
    I will go and get enought for my green houses.
    Thanks again shep.

    Sincerly
    John Sweaney Zone 8

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    NW Oregon
    Posts
    30
    Hi, I've been inactive here for a couple of months -- several other projects going on, and a major computer crash -- but I've been meaning to get back with pictures and commentary about the 30x85' house my husband and I built this year. I've worked in the nursery industry for years and we built a house identical to some I work in, but doing it myself, I learned PLENTY. Maybe over Christmas...

    But anyway, I wanted to say that we did install wire lock channels. Given the opportunity, I would do it again. HOWEVER, our poly is permanently installed until it disintigrates. In our fairly mild climate, if I maintain a good pressurized bubble between the layers, I should get up to 8 years out of a 4-year poly. If I wanted to be able to remove and reinstall the same poly over again, I would go to the expense of buying a huge roll of the poly repair tape, and run a strip of the repair tape where the poly will be lying over the channel. I found that the edges of the metal on the channel can be sharp, and the process of putting the lock wire in and taking it out can slice the poly along that line. A layer of the tape would add some strength. The only other warning is that you will find there is kind of a rhythm to putting the wire in, but the last couple of tucks at the end of the wire are really, really hard on your fingers. If you have more than a few lengths of wire to install, plan to end up with very sore hands.

    Good luck with your project!
    Susan

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Bolton, Ont
    Posts
    149

    Wire lock

    John, the best thing Ive ever used. I have a small halfmoon greenhouse that is not yet up, but when I do put it up I will add poly lock to it.

    I do recommend wirelock for double poly. My greenhouse are single poly and I still use it. Time consuming of corse but well worth it.

    I have certain houses that are for storage only, so poly stays on them for about 5 years or more.

    John I prefer keeping the poly on all times than removing it each year and then putting it on again. Less wear and tear on the poly.

    John I remember when we used nails to support the poly. Those days are gone. Having nails going through the poly sometimes adds to the tearing of the poly.

    Last of note I dont want to repair greenhouses in the middle of the winter. George.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Yelm,Washington
    Posts
    18

    film wire lock

    Hi ;
    I will use the wire locks as recommended.
    Thanks for the input.
    Sincerly
    John Sweaney
    John Sweaney Zone 8

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    SE PA, zone 6b
    Posts
    217

    Greenhouses

    I'm new, therefore the late late answer. I had a beautiful 30x72 coldframe in Mount Vernon, WA. It sat North to South. While there, the "greenhouse" withstood 70 mph winds and those heavy wet snows just fine. I had " wigglewire" holding it all down. Got the whole shebang from OCB in Portland. I spent many a happy hour there. Grew miixed salad greens, among other things for the MV Farmer's market.

    I'm now in SE Pennsylvania, zone 6b. More on this in another posting.
    Sandi
    SE PA, zone 6b

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