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Thread: Getting Spathiphyllum sp.(Peace Lily) to Flower

  1. #1
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    Getting Spathiphyllum sp.(Peace Lily) to Flower

    Hi all ! Well I guess now that it is definitely too cold to garden outdoors we can set our sights indoors. I just realized that I have had a peace lily since 1998 and cannot remember the last time it flowered. It's been in a very large pot all that time. Can't say I'm a consistent waterer since it seems one time it's dry the next time it's still damp and I skip watering it. I read that humidity helps it bloom. I don't know. Any suggestions ?
    "If I keep a green bough in my heart, a singing bird will come"




  2. #2
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    I'm no expert on Peace Lily but I can tell you what works for us. Ours are on a plant stand about 2.5' up. It sits in between two shaded east facing windows, and is as far away from the heat/AC vents as possible. While it is in a space we call our "sun room" it NEVER gets any direct sunlight, but it does get a little filtered sun.

    With experience you can learn to read the plant and it will tell you what it needs.
    Burned dryed leaf tips come from too much sun.
    Heavy, large leaves that tend to fall down is from too much shade, or too much water. Too much water will also turn the outer leaves yellow, and the stems get mushy.
    Droopy curling leaves are asking for water. If they do go dry, you have to set them in the sink, or some container and really soak the soil, then let it drain. The leaves will perk up within a few minutes if water was the problem. Be careful, droopy leaves can also indicate a hard day in a dry or drafty area, check the soil before watering.
    New leaves that are smaller and more horizontal are asking for fertilizer.

    I think you told us what your plant needs. They can go a while without water, but after all, they are from the rain forrest, so they do not like to go dry.

    You should see blooms about 3 or 4 times a year.
    Tom W
    Aching Back Farm

  3. #3
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    Tom- Thank you. Good for me... I had it on the floor next to a floor vent which is right next to a draped south sliding glass door. Number one problem is probably the floor vent. Number 2 is the sun--the drape isn't always closed. I'll have to work on paying attention to how often,or not, I'm watering --I've actually had more symptoms of overwatering than watering. I might also just repot it with new soil. Thank you very much for the info.
    "If I keep a green bough in my heart, a singing bird will come"




  4. #4
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    Y'all are not gonna believe this, but I grow my Spaths in my basement pond!

    They sit on over-turned milk crates with the bottom 2 to 4 inches of the pots actually in the water. They are lighted by overhead fluorescent shop lights. When I had fish in there, the plants acted as the biological filters, even though I did and still do run a pond type filter in it.

    They don't send up many 'flowers' in the fall and winter months, but they do great in the warm months. The smaller ones do get to summer out doors, in buckets of water, under a shade tree.

    Now that I am not keeping fish in the basement 'pond', I do give an occasional light feedling with a w/s general purpose plant food. I also use something similar to 'Osmocote', which is a slow release fertilizer.

    They do need to be repotted into fresh mix every couple of years and I also allow them to dry out (realitively) a couple times a year. And I add aquarium grade activated charcoal to help keep the soil from getting sour. I also have a couple of smaller ones in buckets of water with the charcoal added at the bottom. These Spaths seem to love it!

    Spaths seem to bloom their best during warm weather and with higher light levels, I don't think full sun in winter will hurt them - but have a sheer curtain ready. The biggest problem is from drafts! be they cold air or warn/hot from the furnace. Oddly enough, they do like the bottom heat, so you might look into getting one of those deflectors to use on the vent.

    Hope you found a few helpfull tid-bits in all this!


    Rebecca

  5. #5
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    Oh Rebecca, what a hoot, a basement pond--at first I thought gee is that another way of saying she has basement flooding or something until I read on...I'm still chuckling over what I initially thought. I'm actually very surprised to hear they can live with their toes constantly in water because on some occasions I thought that I had overwatered it. Maybe I should be watering from the saucer rather than from above.
    Good idea about adding activated charcoal when I replant given the length of time between repots.
    The heating/cooling vent plus being right next to the sliding glass door probably hasn't done it any favors. I recall seeing the leaves moving from the force of the a/c or heat. A deflector isn't a bad idea for me as well as the plant. And I really should send them outside under a tree for summer along with the spider plants. Good food for thought !
    Thanks again !
    "If I keep a green bough in my heart, a singing bird will come"




  6. #6
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    I'm in AWE!

    There are very few basements here, and if I had one, it would be a natural underground pond that would fill up to the top at certain times of the year. LAS!

    Cathy, my peace lilies tend to bloom 'off and on' from the time I take them outside (shade) in the spring until Thanksgiving when I bring them in for protection.

    Like Rebecca, I suspect that sufficient lighting is key.
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  7. #7
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    This thread caught my eye, as a friend who owns an arts and crafts shop asked me to find out what plants you grow in the top of a beta fish bowl and have the roots dangling down in the water. She wants me to keep her supplied, as she sells them! I called an aquarium sales place and a nursery and found out that the two plants that they use for this purpose are Peace Lily and Water Hyacinth. The only two places I found where I could buy the Peace Lily are 2 nurseries that charge $1.99/each and $4.99 each! These are in soil and I would have to take them out of the soil they are planted in and flush the roots for at least a week to get any soil and fertilizer residue out of them. I couldn't find anyone who had Water Hyacinth. Does anyone know where I could buy these 2 plants cheaper and who has more than just 3 plants to sell me?
    Linda-So. Oregon, Zones 6/7

  8. #8
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    Last edited by vicki; 02-02-2004 at 09:38 PM.
    Happy Growing,
    Vicki in West. Mich.

  9. #9
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    I will probably cause a bit of trouble over this, but here goes anyway.

    I find this practice to be very inhumane! I am appaled that this is still in practice!

    Nine times out of ten, the plant is not properly maintained; the water is not kept changed on a regular basis, there is little fresh air for the beta to breath, and there is very little space foir the fish to move about freely.

    Being realistic, I know people will continue this practice until it is totally outlawed, so let me add this piece of advice - DO NOT use Water Hyacinths!

    Water Hyacinths require very high light, direct sun, in fact, in order to live and grow properly. This would heat the water to levels that would litterally cook the fish housed in such a set up.
    Water Hyacinths do not make good house plants; they don't even do very well as aquarium plants because of their high light requierments.



    Rebecca
    Nature is trying very hard to make us succeed, but nature does not depend on us. We are not the only experiment.
    - R. Buckminster Fuller

  10. #10
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    Vicki - Thank you for searching out these plants for me. I have emailed one of the sites in Florida for a catalog and will call the toll free # of another in Texas. Silly me, I only did a search on Oregon Nurserymen's Association and came up with nothing! Didn't even think to do a national search! I must have been having a "senior moment"!

    Rebecca - Thank you for bring all this to my attention! I hadn't even thought of the points you mention! I think I'm going to tell her that I can't do this and explain why. In fact I KNOW I'm not going to do this for her! Hopefully she won't even want to ask someone else to do it for her. I'll lose business, but feel a whole lot better in the long run!
    Linda-So. Oregon, Zones 6/7

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