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Thread: Scaly Bulb Propagation-Thanks Ann !

  1. #1
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    Scaly Bulb Propagation-Thanks Ann !

    Today I was outside planting oriental lily bulbs--as long as there are 50 degree days-- I just can't stop gardening !
    Anyway, I ended up with a few leftover 'scales' in the bags that they came in. I remembered that there was something about propagating them on Landspro and voila : instructions and pix. I can't wait to try it ! Thanks Ann !
    "If I keep a green bough in my heart, a singing bird will come"




  2. #2
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    Cathy,

    Between you, me and my Dad, the fascination of propragating those scales, the Rex Begonia leaf cuttings and the Stokes Aster root cuttings were my inspiration for starting Landspro...

    I'll be glad when my new career settles down, and especially glad to have a summer break so that I can get back to gardening and propagating!

    I have so much more that I want to do.

    You brought a big Thanksgiving Day smile to me just knowing you are going to give it a try!

    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  3. #3
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    Just thought I'd post an update. Here it is less than 1 month later and 1 scale has bulblets already. Unfortunately the other 4 have no signs of doing anything but according to the Landspro(Ann's) instructions, bulblets wouldn't be expected for about 2 months anyway. This has been fun ; there's 9 inches of snow onthe ground and I'm growing new lily bulblets, from scales that fell off parent bulbs, in a zip loc bag indoors !
    "If I keep a green bough in my heart, a singing bird will come"




  4. #4
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    Cathy,

    Within a month, you may begin seeing a few roots forming on the mother scale, but anything else is a plus...

    In six weeks, the new bublets and roots should start to form. It is at this time that you may want to resist 'peaking' for the tiny new bulblets forming may be extremely small.

    After 2 months, you can start checking and if the bulblets are large enough and have roots of their own, you can begin to separate them from the mother bulb if you want.

    The trick is to gain experience and recognize when the bulblet is no longer feeding on the mother scale. It is at this time that it will easily be removed from the mother scale and will not suffer from loss of nutrition.

    What is really neat is that the mother scale will continue to produce new bulblets as long as optimum moisture and warmth are provided.

    Sooner or later, the mother scale will start to shrivel because all of the stored energy has been expended.

    It is truly neat to observe nature trying its best to preserve its own...

    Enjoy! It is not only FUN, it is FASCINATING!
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  5. #5
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    Oops, correction--the one scale is making roots..which will then become bulblets
    Thanks for the heads up on being careful once the bulblets do form--I am a peeker !
    Last edited by Dazed_Lily; 12-13-2003 at 07:42 PM.
    "If I keep a green bough in my heart, a singing bird will come"




  6. #6
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    Ann-Help, Mold ?!

    Ann/Anyone: One root coming off the scale grew up out of the soil in the bag. I noticed that it was covered with white hairs which I'd like to believe are feeder roots but of course they are probably mold ! Your advice on what to do now would be appreciated .
    Thanks,Cathy
    "If I keep a green bough in my heart, a singing bird will come"




  7. #7
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    Cathy,

    Wash the scale and remove the roots if you have to... Isolate that scale from any others until you know that the fungus is gone.

    You need to use a fungicide on the scale. It needs to be one that it recommended for bulbs.

    If you are using a sterile, soiless media, then most likely the fungus was on the bulb/scale itself when you received it. That is not uncommon.

    You do want to get rid of the fungus because it will spread.

    Sometimes fungus will just tend to grow on dead material, so that is why I say to wash the scale. You can use a mild detergent that is safe for plant. Most likely that will help.

    I either use Captan or rooting hormone with Fungicide. There are many products out there, but you need to check the label to see if they are safe for bulbs.

    Good Luck!
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  8. #8
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    Thanks for the info. I just got MORE bulbs today and was out there planting them today. It was in the 50's today--hard to believe in Zone 6 ! Planted Lilium Henryi that were the biggest bulbs I've ever planted(they are in the Aurelian/Trumpet division) and Devotion which is an Oriental. Devotion had some scales loose in the bag. The seller offered this advice for growing scales. I wonder why the 'no light' aspect as well as heat, but here it is in the spirit of sharing :
    "We do our scales now in the sawdust
    I shipped in, it seems to work the best and I
    have tried everything, we also went to using
    those plasic bins, shoeboxes or Gladware,
    depending on the amount of scales we have. We
    use an old electric blanket for bottom heat and I
    cover it all with a tarp to keep light out and
    heat in. Most of the scales MUST have the very
    base attached in order to grow new bulblets,
    sometimes bulblets will start in the middle of
    the scale."
    "If I keep a green bough in my heart, a singing bird will come"




  9. #9
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    Mmmmmm....

    I have never tried the combination of no light with heat. I have let some stay in the frig (obviously no light) over the winter, but that doesn't give any heat.

    If that works than I will not have to utilize limited flourescent light space, but I will have to find a source for bottom heat!

    Thanks for passing those tips along. I will try them and report my findings.

    You know me.... Always looking for easier, better ways!

    Merry Christmas!
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  10. #10
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    Whoops!

    Cathy,

    I forgot to mention. There are quite a few differences amongst the various liliums. A few can be propagated from stem cuttings, or so I have been told.

    The Stargazer lilium will tend to form roots at the base of the stem (above the bulb top). You can sometimes see the roots exposed just above soil level if they are planted in pots. I have always wanted to try breaking those off and planting them to see if they will form bulbs, but I haven't yet.

    Some, like the Tiger Lily will form bulblets inside the base of leaves on the stem.

    Some bloom in the spring and some in the summer...

    There are many differences in the various varieties.

    One thing they all seem to have in common is that you can propagate them via scales. And, yes, I always try to include the base. There seems to be less opportunity for rot if the main part of the scale is not broken and exposed.

    The media should be moist, not wet. They do not do well sitting in wet soil for extended periods of time.

    Fun, aren't they?
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  11. #11
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    My little Easter surprise was to open a bag of wood shavings that had some leftover scales in it. I have had really no success with growing scales that had fallen off a bulb in transit. I do hear however that it must have some basal plate on it.
    Anyway, there I was cleaning my kitchen and I peeked in the bag and found one scale with a root and upon closer inspection- 3 roots. I stuck it in a pot with another bulb. I have no idea what the scale was from, but it was a nice surprise.
    "If I keep a green bough in my heart, a singing bird will come"




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