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Thread: Winter Arrived with a Vengeance

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Center Point, TX
    Posts
    256

    Angry Winter Arrived with a Vengeance

    BRRRR - South Texas isn't supposed to be 23 degrees until at least January or February if at all.

    Hopefully got everything in the greenhouse that needed to get there.

    Remote reading thermometer indicated greenhouse never fell below 43 degrees with the heater on half power.
    Gary J
    Center Point, TX
    Hill Country Texas Master Gardener
    USDA Zone 7B
    AHS Heat Zone 8

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Wichita,Kansas
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    Brrrrr is right !

    Yup, with wind chill this morning it was 5 degrees. Saturday was the ‘last hurrah’ and winter barreled through during the night and that’s what we woke up to Sunday morning. Knew we were in for it when I saw the dog’s water bowl was frozen over. Of course, being a Norwegian Elkhound, she thinks this is primo weather for her and that we are just wimps. Ran around Saturday trying to add more mulch (cotton hulls) to the daylilies, trumpets, cannas and tiger lilies. You know the Dahlia story and I also stored some glads. Used straw on the iris as I read that you really don’t want anything packing down on them. ‘Harvested’ 3 orange sized watermelons (what a hoot, I call them our Thanksgiving watermelons. I grew them in tubs and have hope that next year I can grow full sized ones in a regular garden plot if I can keep my 4 legged assistant away from them). Had a couple of plants in pots (daylilies; hollyhocks) that went into the garage (I figured that mulching things in the ground was job #1 and anything in pots were portable to a sheltered location). . It is supposed to be in the 50’s Thurs and Fri and I will plant them then along with some oriental bulbs and daffs.
    Last edited by Dazed_Lily; 11-24-2003 at 07:57 AM.
    "If I keep a green bough in my heart, a singing bird will come"




  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Zone 9a - Gulf Coast
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    As luck would have it, our first freeze is tomorrow morning. We are forecasted for 28 degrees which is quite a switch from the heat we have been experiencing.

    I was hoping that the first frost would arrive after the start of Thanksgiving holidays, but that will not be the case.

    School closes at 1PM tomorrow. I don't know what time the teachers will get off.

    Tomorrow is going to be a rough day. The kids will not want to do very much except to get into trouble.

    Later....
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Posts
    598
    Here it is, Nov. 25, and we finally got our first freeze here in central AL. last night as well.
    Propagation is just a hobby for me, even though I've traded some plants locally and am growing a few plants for a local nursery for them to sell at retail. I alway choose to propagate things that are either native to this area, or are zoned to tollerate the heat and cold here. However, with new plants that are still in pots, I do have to protect the root system from the cold. To do this I simply 'heal' them in with a nest of pine straw. That is basicly just a line of straw with pots shoved into it, followed by more lines of straw and pots. One afternoon last week I went out and collected about 4 cu yds of straw, and bedded several hundred pots when I got home.

    All the pots are setting on a black plastic area, with a sprinkler system that covers the entire area. That sprinkler is not on a timer like the mist system, but it only needs to be truned on about once ever few days, and not even that much in the winter with all that mulch in there.

    Here is a picture that may do more to explain how this all works:
    Attached Images  
    Tom W
    Aching Back Farm

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Center Point, TX
    Posts
    256

    Zone localized, but push envelope too!!

    I too try to raise mostly what will both over-winter ( cold hardy), but also what will over-summer (heat hardy) here also.

    For my own pleasure though I tend to push the envelope a bit. I raise some cold hardy citrus, epiphyllum (jungle orched cactus), and most recently several cold hardy avocado trees. It is just too much of a challenge to me to see if I can find the right microclimate for some of these plants to grow.
    Gary J
    Center Point, TX
    Hill Country Texas Master Gardener
    USDA Zone 7B
    AHS Heat Zone 8

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Wichita,Kansas
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    I'm a big 'heeling-in' user; moreso when I can't get to planting right away during the season, but it is also useful when the cold sets in. I usually 'sink' pots into the ground. I got a little lazy or maybe became a gambler in not getting my potted junipers(in the process of being moved) 'sunk'. It is usually dependent on finding soil that can be easily dug--I'm glad you brought this up as I will add it to my to do list for the end of the week when it warms up to 50. I did make one mistake with some trumpet vine seedlings and left them on the garage floor. They look like crsipy critters right now, but I 've learned to never underestimate the will to survive of plants, so I will just press on assuming they will come back again. Thanks for the pix and the technique reminder.
    "If I keep a green bough in my heart, a singing bird will come"




  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Zone 9a - Gulf Coast
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    Major Melt-Down!

    When I left early this morning, everything was still bright and green, but frozen....

    When I came home, everything was brown and drooping!

    Ah, what can I say? The signs that winter have arrived...

    It's cold outside, but I know that we have some nice, warm days ahead. My kids were cold and do not like not being able to come into the buildings early to get out of the cold.

    I have a class temporarily assigned to me. They are normally in a portable, and believe me, they are grateful to be in a real classroom even if my control the air/heat is limited.

    Even though I was disappointed to come home to see the drooping, brown leaves, I know that in just a few short months, they will be green and everything will have fresh new growth.

    By then, I hope to be more settled into the teaching routine!
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


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