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Thread: Cold Hardy Avocado's - Eureka

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Center Point, TX
    Posts
    256

    Talking Cold Hardy Avocado's - Eureka

    I have found them!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    FINALLY, I have found a source for proven cold hardy avocados. They are growing as far north as Austin, Texas (7B - 8A) and have easily survived temperatures of 14 degrees and beared fruit the following year.

    I bought 2 of the trees from a man in Devine Texas whose avocado nursery is appropriately named Devine Avocados. He collects avocado grafting wood from trees that are producing in cold prone areas. He has 13 varieties, some as tall as 30 feet. I bought plants (not cheap) in one gallon containers from his best producing types. One is named Opal Holland and the other Wilma.

    His name is Bill Schneider and he advises Texas A&M on growing avocados. You can reach him at 830 663-2492 and tell him Gary J sent you.

    Have also been fussing with cold hardy citrus and they are doing well - eating meyer lemons, satsuma tangelos and limes. BTW, Bill has a lime that has also survived 14 degrees without added heat and with minimal wood loss. We are working on propagating it - although it will probably be grafted to flying dragon rootstock, rather than rooted as a cutting although we will try that too. Am looking for a Thomlinson Citrangequat - anyone help??
    Last edited by sewfarsewgood; 11-13-2003 at 09:30 PM.
    Gary J
    Center Point, TX
    Hill Country Texas Master Gardener
    USDA Zone 7B
    AHS Heat Zone 8

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Zone 9a - Gulf Coast
    Posts
    9,934

    Avocados.... Yum!

    And you know what? There is a city not very far from me, less than 20 miles that is named 'Satsuma'...

    They used to grow Satsumas and other citris on Dauphin Island until there was a record breaking, really low freeze one year. They losts lots of money that year, and few have tried it since. The tourist settled after that.

    I understand that the Satsuma is very similar to a tangerine, but the taste is different. Just the texture and the way you peel them is the same. If I remember correctly, the Satsuma is more tart, and the tangerine more sweet, but there is actually more to it than that.

    We are scheduled to have a low of 37 tonight, and considering what happened my microclimate last year, I am really chancing it. I am NOT ready.

    I just finished creating tests for 2 different classes. I have to do 4 versions of each in order to discourage cheating. It's that bad. And it hurts me to see them do that because it is only hurting them when they do...

    Cheers!
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    northeast Tennessee
    Posts
    1,703
    Gary and Ann,
    Just wanted to let you know that It was 25 this morning when I went to work. Hope everything was where it should be. Cold frame full, Another one on the way.
    When we get a small greenhouse up that I can heat all winter I want one of the lemon and lime trees. That would be so good.
    tennessee sue

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Center Point, TX
    Posts
    256

    Far South Texas

    25 degrees - I knew there was a good reason I moved this far south. Looking at a map the San Antonio area is about as far south as Key West.
    Gary J
    Center Point, TX
    Hill Country Texas Master Gardener
    USDA Zone 7B
    AHS Heat Zone 8

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Zone 6B
    Posts
    2

    Re: Cold Hardy Avocado's - Eureka

    Originally posted by sewfarsewgood
    I have found them!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    FINALLY, I have found a source for proven cold hardy avocados. They are growing as far north as Austin, Texas (7B - 8A) and have easily survived temperatures of 14 degrees and beared fruit the following year.

    I bought 2 of the trees from a man in Devine Texas whose avocado nursery is appropriately named Devine Avocados. He collects avocado grafting wood from trees that are producing in cold prone areas. He has 13 varieties, some as tall as 30 feet. I bought plants (not cheap) in one gallon containers from his best producing types. One is named Opal Holland and the other Wilma.

    His name is Bill Schneider and he advises Texas A&M on growing avocados. You can reach him at 830 663-2492 and tell him Gary J sent you.

    Have also been fussing with cold hardy citrus and they are doing well - eating meyer lemons, satsuma tangelos and limes. BTW, Bill has a lime that has also survived 14 degrees without added heat and with minimal wood loss. We are working on propagating it - although it will probably be grafted to flying dragon rootstock, rather than rooted as a cutting although we will try that too. Am looking for a Thomlinson Citrangequat - anyone help??
    Here is something you may be able to use. I didn't research it but you can.

    ----- Original Message -----=20
    From: Mark Lee=20
    To: nafex@lists.ibiblio.org=20
    Sent: Wednesday, January 15, 2003 8:43 PM
    Subject: RE: [NAFEX] Hardy Citrus


    What is the minimum temperature that galgal can survive? =20
    =20
    I recently found Thomasville Citrangequat which can be grown =
    unprotected at -10C (14F) and protected at -15C (5F). The fruit it =
    produces is very seedy and is similar to a lime. Here is a link to a =
    page with a good picture of the fruit.
    http://www.junglegardens.co.uk/Plant...b/dept_13.html
    I haven't grow this personally, but I thought I would give it a try =
    this year.
    -Mark Lee, Seattle z7


    Also found this:

    http://forums.gardenweb.com/forums/l...342031730.html

    Hope this helps.
    SFG - a.k.a.: Sam

    May you be in heaven hour before
    the devil e'en knows ye are dead!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Center Point, TX
    Posts
    256

    Citrangequat

    I found one at a friends over in the Houston area. He raises about 150 kinds of citrus and he had one for sale at a tasting of citrus he holds each year.

    gary J
    Gary J
    Center Point, TX
    Hill Country Texas Master Gardener
    USDA Zone 7B
    AHS Heat Zone 8

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Zone 6B
    Posts
    2

    Re: Citrangequat

    Originally posted by sewfarsewgood
    I found one at a friends over in the Houston area. He raises about 150 kinds of citrus and he had one for sale at a tasting of citrus he holds each year.

    gary J
    Good. From what I understand, these can be eaten in their entirety, like a smooth Kiwi. Is this correct?

    And what varieties of avacado did you find that is hardy to 14? Will they live if below 32 temps continue, or is that a one-time shot of 14 weather for just a few hours? There IS a difference, you know.

    In zone 6 it rarely, if ever, gets to 14, so would you say that they would survive, there?

    Does this gentleman have an e-mail or fax # where he can be contacted? I will not disseminate his information unless he wants it out.

    Thank you.

    SFG
    SFG - a.k.a.: Sam

    May you be in heaven hour before
    the devil e'en knows ye are dead!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Center Point, TX
    Posts
    256

    Devine Avocados

    Email Bill Schneider at brs@devtex.net

    Bill will tell you everything and more about his avocados. I doubt he has info on growing them in zone 6, but I have no doubt about them growing in my 7B, especially with my microclimates that are warmer than that. Heck I have places in my courtyard where water didn't freeze at all at 23 degrees.

    Tell bill Gary J sent you.
    Gary J
    Center Point, TX
    Hill Country Texas Master Gardener
    USDA Zone 7B
    AHS Heat Zone 8

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