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Thread: Easter Lily's

  1. #1
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    Easter Lily's

    OK, here we go.
    I know a little, about a lot of things, and a lot about a few things. but I don't have a clue about Easter lily's.

    Last spring I bought several that were in full bloom at easter, then the flowers faded, and the plants stayed green. About 2 months ago they all started to fade, and then the tops died back, but the bulbs are still green. There are roots coming out of the drain holes in these 6" pots, and some leaves that look like new young plants developing.

    I'm not especially interested in propagating them, I just want to know what I can do to preserved them for next year. Can they go in the ground here in zone 7, or do they just stay where they are, or get a new larger pot. I've heard that they probably will not bloom in time for Easter, but that's OK. I just want to retain as many as I can, with the least amount of trouble/work. Any/all suggestions or clues from anybody?
    Tom W
    Aching Back Farm

  2. #2
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    Tom, Those Easter Lilies should do very well planted in the ground in your zone 7 garden. Plant them at least 6 inches deep and cover with mulch for a bit of added protection their first winter. They should have really good drainage, and I often add an inch or two of gravel to the bottom of th eplanting holes to insure this.

    Their normal bloom time is mid summer.

    Rebecca
    Nature is trying very hard to make us succeed, but nature does not depend on us. We are not the only experiment.
    - R. Buckminster Fuller

  3. #3
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    Tom,

    The botanical name of the Easter Lily is Lilium Longiflorum. According to my bulb book, they are hardy to zone 6 and marginally hardy in zone 5 with extra protection. They are a white trumpet lily, and they should multiply.

    Here's one of many links that I could find.

    http://pss.uvm.edu/pss123/fplili.html

    Have FUN!
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  4. #4
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    Woo-Hoo Dug Up this Thread 'Cause I just got 2 Easter Lilies

    I dug up this thread because I just acquired 2 Easter Lilies. I love it when people don't understand that just 'cause flowers are gone on a plant doesn't mean it's time to toss. I found these at the door along with some mums(that needed tossing) at Church--ready for trash pickup(and since I clean the side chapel--guess who got dibs on them). I took the mums for their plastic pots.

    The Easter lilies are healthy and very green and huge about 2 feet + tall.
    Can I put them outside now or should I 'harden them off' first ?
    I hear they like lime and that soil is critical to success. Any advice on what to do from here ?
    Thanks,Cathy
    Oh and what kind of light do they need ?
    Last edited by Dazed_Lily; 04-18-2004 at 05:47 PM.
    "If I keep a green bough in my heart, a singing bird will come"




  5. #5
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    Cathy,

    Some people don't care.

    Your "Easter Lilies" should be perfectly hardy in your zone, so after hardening them off, place them out in your garden. They should recieve at least a half day's sun, but, like all lilies, will take full sun. The more important factor is that they have really good drainage! I couldn't support or refute the need for lime, so I won't say yaeh nor ney about it.

    Most lilies do benefit from organic matter, ie, humus, worked into the soil, but they shouldn't miss it if it isn't there. The soil should be amemded if it is heavy clay - like I have. Still the best soil in the world won't matter a bit if the drainage isn't there. They like moisture, but really resent staying wet, expecially the Regal (Modonna or Easter) Lilies. I have alway dug my planing holes a bit deeper and tossed in a couple of inches of oea gravel when the drainage issue was in question. That would keep the bulb from actually sitting in water.

    Another thing about the 'Easter Lily' is that it is very important to mulch them heavily the first couple of years, especially over the winter months. Leaving some of the mulch for the growing season will help retain moisture and cut down on weeds.

    Once you plant your rescues they will most like slowly begin to go into dormancy. Often they will sprout new growth around mid summer, but don't expect blooms until next year, probably in late June or early July, the normal bloom time for these lilies.

    Oh! It won't hurt to plant them deeper than they are growing in the pots, although you may need to strip off some of the lower leaves first.

    Enjoy your "find" and send pictures when they bloom for you next year!

    Rebecca
    Nature is trying very hard to make us succeed, but nature does not depend on us. We are not the only experiment.
    - R. Buckminster Fuller

  6. #6
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    Wow ! Hauled in 30 Madonna(Easter) Lilies today and have a total of 38 ! A good example of 'be careful what you ask for, you might get it '. But I'm happy to have them none the less
    "If I keep a green bough in my heart, a singing bird will come"




  7. #7
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    Cathy,

    I don't know what your plans are for that many Regal Lilies, but you have got to do a mass planting of 10 or 12 of them in a special bed! Talk about a traffic stopper, that would do it! Perhaps an all white bed with the lilies as the central focus. Annuals to consider:
    Allysum
    Ageratum
    Marigold (African type, more cream than white-white, but they are great!)
    White Glads

    Perennials might include:

    White Columbine
    Speedwell or Saliva (in white)
    White Bleeding Heart
    White Coneflower
    White Corn Poppies (probably more of an annual than a perennial)
    Tall Beaded Iris

    Bulbs:

    Tulips
    Daffodils (Mt. Hood is one that comes immediately to mind)
    White Grape Hyacinth
    Hyacinths
    Grecian Wind Flowers
    "Star of Bethlehem" (Ornithch.)

    Once you start looking you can find all white or near white flowers, and let's not forget a few white daylilies! Joan Senior is very white as is Ice Carnival, Gentle Shepherd, White Temptation and those are just the Dips! There are several white or near-white Tets as well


    Rebecca

  8. #8
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    That is a fantastic idea. Hubby was asking what I was going to do with them. I have white tall bearded reblooming iris(Glowing Seraphim) which I decided I should really plant elsewhere(in the fall) and another white with just a hint of pale blue(breathtaking- but not sure of the name). I also have one Gentle Sheperd and some of those seedlings from your seeds might produce some whites. I have white Shasta daisies.

    Thanks for that idea of an all white garden; that list will come in handy.
    "If I keep a green bough in my heart, a singing bird will come"




  9. #9
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    Man, I don't believe I forgot all about the Shasta Daises! Something else that would give a nice contrast would be any of the white margined Hosta cultivars, just be sure to check the mature size so they don't get too big for the area.

    If you put this garden against a fence, you can also use morning glories and moon flower or a white Clematis. Oh the possibilities!



    Rebecca
    Attached Images  

  10. #10
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    11 more Easter lilies today. That makes about 51. However, I do not know how many will survive. Once I got those 30 last week, I couldn't baby them anymore. They all went outside(in pots) under trees or against the foundation in front of the house. Then we had temps go down into the 40's and it rained big time. Now I see many with yellowing leaves but still some that are all green, so it's hard to say how many will end up making it. The ones I got today were all yellowing(and they had been inside). Time will tell.
    That reminds me, yesterday at Wally World I tried to negotiate for some LA Lilies(not Easter--they were orange or yellow) that were heading for the dumpster. The manager looks at this one lily(in the trash) and says ,"gee, it doesn't look bad and it was $6.57; I'll sell it to you for $1.50". I told him I was looking to pay less than a $1. Then he comes up with a $1 for the smaller ones. Admittedly, I did a bad job negotiating firstly cause I didn't have two numbers straight in my head-my absolute and next to absolute and didn't have my 'story'. I was left there kind of going through the lilies and along came a woman who said she was sent to tally . I told her I was glad she was there because I wanted to relay that I wasn't going to take anything--then, like a dweeb I gave her the story I should have given the manager. I told her that you can't look at the lily and see a plant--it's just a bulb--those green leaves will be gone and nothing else will be coming along. And it's a crap shoot--50/50 that the bulb hasn't rotted. Also, that they were selling bulbs 6/$3.50 ten feet away. Where was this great oratory when the manager was there. Oh well, I don't think my heart was in it or I would have 'fought' harder. Now if they were daylilies....
    "If I keep a green bough in my heart, a singing bird will come"




  11. #11
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    You should have a good survival rate, actually, with all those "Easter" Lilies.

    Once they have gone dormant, let them rest for a few weeks then go ahead and plant them. Plant them deep* and have mulch ready to pile on top of them when winter arrives. Six to eight inches wouldn't be too much. Start pulling it back a month before your last frost date.

    * deep would be 6 inches. Mulch heavily for at least two winters, by then they will have established themselves. Remember they require nearly perfect drainage - they are a little more tempermental about that then other types. Leave enough space between the bulbs for them to increase too - 6 to 8 inches would be good.

    I'm waiting for all the lilies in my "new" lily bed to bloom so I can tag the ones I didn't get tagged last fall. I'm also waiting on all the potted ones to bloom for the first time so I can tag them! It won't be much longer though as the "Pixie" and "Enchantment" Lilies are all showing big, fat buds. Some of the tall Asiatics are also showing buds. And, my first daylily opened it's first flower today. Good ol' Stella! Now if all the others would just start to send up scapes!

    Rebecca

  12. #12
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    Easter Lily Blooming

    My Easter Lily's that I purchased for $1 five inch pots are now in bloom. They are still in five inch pots, but they don't seem to mind. They were not protected during the winter. I had them under the yellow jasmine vine, but moved them to another semi-shaded spot.

    They don't seem to mind being in part shade, either....
    Attached Images  
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  13. #13
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    I still do not know much about Easter Lily's, but thanks to all the good advice I now have some blooming in a flower bed.
    Ann, looks like I am about 4 days behind you on these. I guess it could be, in part, the environment. Mine only get morning sun.

    Oh, those tall things behind the Easter Lily's are a bunch of Tiger lily's that will be blooming next month. Here, take a look:
    Attached Images  
    Tom W
    Aching Back Farm

  14. #14
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    Wow nice pix ! I hope my EL's do survive !
    About those tiger lilies, I have a bunch of 2 year olds in pots that have yet to bloom and that look like they are on their last hurrah. Oddly, enough they are making bulbils like there's no tomorrow. Given that they don't look so good and are far from flowering, is this some attempt by Mother Nature to ensure survival--making bulbils is maybe akin to sending out life rafts ? Or are tiger lilies just that way ? Do you think being in pots is what is causing them to languish ?
    thnx
    "If I keep a green bough in my heart, a singing bird will come"




  15. #15
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    The perspective may be just a bit off. The Easter Lily's and Stella's are about 2' tall. The Tiger Lily's are 5'6" tall. The tiger stems are covered with bulbils, and the tops are just now forming buds. Last year the bulbils that fell off and rooted are now about a foot tall, and even they have little bulbils on them.

    I didn't get around to planting all the Easter Lily's and now have some, still in little 5" pots, that will be in full bloom in another day or two. So, I really don't know that the pot is all the issue with your tigers not blooming. The shape of the leaves makes it hard to get water into the pot, so they may be suffering from that. They also tend to put on new little bulbs under ground, so they may be getting a bit crowded. As with most bulbs, they need to rebuild after blooming, so they may have suffered loss after that. Put them in the ground, give them a bit of balanced fertilizer, and build them up for next year. But keep your hopes up, they are not supposed to be blooming yet any way.

    When I planted both lily's, I spread some really old compost out about 4" deep, stirred it with the soil underneath a bit, then planted the bulbs with about 2" of cover over the top. Early in the spring I scattered a bit of cotton seed meal over the bed, and then when they started showing up, I sprinkled a little 14-14-14 Osmacote (6 month) on each hill.
    Tom W
    Aching Back Farm

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