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Thread: September Color in My Gardens

  1. #1
    Join Date
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    September Color in My Gardens

    If there is one plant that adds more vibrant color to my landscape and is easily seen from the road, it is the plant I know of as 'Copper Plant'. It is also commonly known as 'Copper Leaf' and/or 'Jacob's Coat'. It is one of many plants commonly known as Jacob's Coat.

    The botanical name is Acalypha wilkesiana, and it definitely brigns color to my gardens from spring to frost. It is an annual here, but easily overwintered if kept moist. I have already rooted one cutting for overwintering and will probably do many more before winter so that I can have lots of them in different parts of my landscape.

    Here is a picture of one of the leaves. The leaves are about about 5" wide and 7" large, perhaps a little larger. I have not measured. The plant is about 3-4' tall.


    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  2. #2
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    Cardinal Flower

    Remember the Cardinal Flower? Well, this one is different, but definitely one that the hummingbirds would like. It is commonly known as Cardinal Guard, Scarlet Flame or Firespike.

    Mine is relatively new. I have had it for a year, but it is still in a pot. I simply can't seem to make up my mind as to where it will look and perform the best.

    The botanical name is Odontonema strictum, and it is another candidate for fall cuttings.



    For a closer look at the flowers...



    Not a big flower, but the clusters of red 'spikes' are a welcome surprise!
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  3. #3
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    More RED!

    You've seen pics of my red passiflora blooms before. I thought you might want to see the plant.

    It's a little unruly right now. It has taken over one of my antique roses, but not to worry.... I have another one!





    My passifloras start blooming their best in late August and will continue to bloom until the first frost. This one starts later than some, but in time will have lots of red blooms.

    And, yes, that is an oak seedling peaking out amongst the vine leaves. They pop up all over the place! I'm not sure what the other small leaves are. Something else that has popped up. On the left, you can see a crinum leaf. It doesn't seem to mind since it finished blooming some time ago. The crinum will also be moved this winter.
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    SE of Houston, TX
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    Acalapha

    Ann, I love acalaphas for color also. I have the large leafted A. wilksiana 'Louisiana' and 'Ceylon'. The former has leaves the same size but is green boldly variegated yellow (instead of red). The latter is a curled leaf, same coloration as the one you pictured. I don't have the large red that you showed. Perhaps a trade down the road. There are more varieties of this plant than most people are aware of, but for color, they can't be beat.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
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    Central Indiana Zone 5a
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    The Passifloras are so beautiful, regardless of the color variety, unfortunately they are not hardy up in my Zone 5a garden and get much too big to try to grow in a pot, even a big one that would have to be drug up and down the steps every spring and fall.

    You just keep posting images of them for all us Yankee's to enjoy!

    Rebecca

  6. #6
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    Bob,

    The curly leaved, copper colored one was my first many years ago. I especially like that one. I didn't see any on the market this year, but then again, I didn't have much time to go shopping last spring.

    So, I would say that a trade is definitely in order.

    This is one of those plants that it definitely helps to cut off the outer 2/3rds of the top leaves when propagating.

    Rebecca,

    There are some passifloras that do well in a container, but I wouldn't suggest it with this one. It does get HUGE, and the roots get very large. They popped up all over in my back yard and the ditch (the other side of the fence this spring. I wouldn't consider them invasive, though. All you have to do is pull up. clip or mow over the plants that 'pop up' and they don't come back.

    I'll try to take more pictures when this one is blooming more heavily.

    I like it too!
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  7. #7
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    My Favorite New Guinea Impatiens

    This is my favorite New Guinea Impatiens.

    The blooms are lavender and the plant requires so little care. Since it is in a hanging basket, I was able to overwinter it. I didn't have time to root cuttings.



    These are not as easy to root as regular impatiens, and you rarely see a seed pod ripen on them, but I do like them!
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  8. #8
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    Thunbergia Grandiflora

    I've got to tell you....

    I really do like this plant. It blooms from spring to frost with LOTS fo blooms, and it's such a joy to see!



    And the blooms are so large!!!! It's easy to root from cuttings and blooms well in a pot. This one is still in a pot.
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    SE of Houston, TX
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    35

    Mushrooms!!

    Yep, An early morning walk through our backyard revealed these rather attractive mushrooms growing in a large potted plant of Manihot escuilenta variegata (variegated Tapioca). I enjoy letting nature into our yard including these beautiful fungi.
    Attached Images  

  10. #10
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    The same color in August.

    Once again, I really do like this vine. Every year, it has more and more clusters of flowers. It started blooming really heavy about a month ago....

    This picture was taken with my new camera.

    Thunbergia Grandiflora
    Attached Images  
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  11. #11
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    Aug 2001
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    Western Michigan near Muskegon
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    beautiful pics

    Lucky you Ann, a new camera. I love your pictures, they are always so clear.
    I really like the Thunbergia Grandiflora. My gardening friend Nancy bought me a black eyed susan vine (I know they're related). Planted it in one of the huge planters that was a birthday gift from my children. I have a fan type trellis (gift from a friend who makes garden/yard items and sells at flea markets) that it has totally covered. I'm sure it would have kept going if I would've had something taller. It has done really nice for me and saddens me to think when frost arrives it will be gone. I will surely buy another one next year!
    I also love new guinea impatiens, though have never seen the lavender ones. I have 4, 2 that are red and 2 that are dark rose colored.
    Now I know what firespike's are, I like that tropical look.
    Foliage like the Acalypha wilkesiana sure adds an extra touch.
    It's wonderful to see plants from different areas/zones.

    My great blue lobelia are blooming nicely here. I also have some burgundy sunflowers that are just now starting to open their pretty faces. Of course the morning glories and wave petunias are kickin' too. Also can't forget about the heavenly smelling hosta plantageia. Lovely large clear white flowers are now starting to open. The phlox are still blooming nicely and the sedums are now starting to color up.
    The asters are starting to bloom and the mums are budding up nicely. Still have a couple daylily's blooming, hyperion, frans hal, and bright orange (not the kwanso), with heavenly smelling blooms. My tropical hibisicus has done very nicely, and I love the double red blooms, it is in the matching large planter that the black eyed susan vine is in.
    I guess I have made this long enough . . . . .
    Happy Growing,
    Vicki in West. Mich.

  12. #12
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    I know this is an old thread, but these are the blooms that I am starting to see.

    Vicki, I adore the Black Eyed Susan vines. They are so tiny compared to the Thunbergia Grandifora, but so similar. The grandiflora has HUGE leaves and the bloom is quite large. They are all in the garden now, and I am confident of them coming back every year.

    I had a volunteer of the Black Eyed Susan come up in one of my hanging baskets this winter. They appear to grow quite well during the cool months of the winter with minimal protection. I lost it though during the first month of drought when I neglected to keep that hanging pot watered. Still, I now know that this is some color that I could add during the winter months and they do not take that much space.

    I plan to sow seeds of several colors of the smaller version of Thunbergia during the early fall and I hope they will bloom in my patio and porch during the winter. That would be COOL!
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


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