+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Cotinus propagation

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Surrey, BC, Canada
    Posts
    221

    Cotinus propagation

    Noticed a fairly recent development in propagating cotinus, wanted to pass along.

    Cotinus are noted to be generally tough to root cuttings, having in my experience a very tight window of opportunity sometime in June around here. Otherwise, they are very slow to root, and generally unsuccessful.

    The International Plant Propagation Society proceedings contained a new system, that looks useful.

    They tried comparing normal softwood tip cuttings, with and without the very soft "tip" removed (it often rots away under mist) and another type of cutting made by pinching the newly sprouting stem to produce several side branches. These branched stems were then taken for cuttings rather than the normal single tipped stem.

    The results were over 90% success using the mini-branched cuttings, with NO added rooting hormone. Less success with hormone, rather surprisingly. Conventional wisdom with cotinus was to use #3 on the softwood cuttings, and indeed this seemed to be best on the standard type which usually couldn't sustain the little growing tip.

    Not explained totally, but in general it is the growing tips of the cutting that produce natural rooting hormones, which then move down the stem to the rooting end, and start the new roots happening. With 3 or 4 branchlets on the cutting, all producing this rooting auxin, it seems the cuttings can do without artificial stuff.

    Another bonus with this method is a quicker, well branched plant resulting...cotinus can tend to look rather ugly, leggy and unbalanced...these cuttings have resulted in nicely balanced, branched attractive plants.

    I've also been happy with doing these from seed, very tough, resilient and fast growing plants...just have to weed out all the greener seedlings early on.

    Hope that's interesting to someone. Always a popular plant, and often in short supply=$$$ for good growers...

    Glen in BC

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Posts
    443

    cotinus

    hi glenn
    i had some seeds someone gave me and i had lost the tags.
    i put them in a bag of damp promix and put them on top of the fridge and forgot about them they germed and i potted them and forgot about them for the most part except when it came time to get wet feet.turns out i have a dozen cotinus.
    so with that said i think they do well from seed.
    by far it was easy .i have been getting a fair price for the others i had that are 3 yr old repotted twice. plant band to 1 gallon and now in 3 gallon.i need to get more of them.
    i really dont think i will ever do cuttings , but you never know.
    thanks for the info!
    shepp zone5/6

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Western Michigan near Muskegon
    Posts
    1,462
    Hi,
    This is a good thing to know. I have a friend that I was going to take cuttings of hers. Instead maybe I can collect some seed.
    When do the seeds ripen? Are they obvious?

    Thanks!
    Happy Growing,
    Vicki in West. Mich.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    northeast Tennessee
    Posts
    1,703
    Potted our purple cotinus to 3 gal. This spring and they are beautiful. Sell very well for us. Shepp, what do you get for a 3 gallon up there?
    tennessee sue

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Surrey, BC, Canada
    Posts
    221

    cotinus seed

    I collected seed about a month ago. It seems to drop off the "smoke" after a while, so there might be slim pickins by now.

    I tried scarifying 2 ways, and the hot water thing just killed the seed, tho you're supposed to be able to pour hot water over the seeds and let em soak overnight before stratifying.

    Using about 3% hydrogen peroxide worked well, just soaked them in a cup of that then threw in the peat moss and sand and kept that in a ziploc in the fridge until ready to sow in the spring.

    These are very hard coated seeds, so the stratifying can help, unless you're sowing right in the ground/container outside where the winter weather will wear thru the seed by spring.

    Like Shepp, I found the seedlings incredibly tough, just ignored them mostly and they grew well once I got around to potting them up. Some of my seedlings are real nice coloured, too...just as good and maybe better than the Royal purple from cuttings. I'm tempted to take cuttings from a couple of them rather than the big named variety bushes...and usually young plants give better rooting cutting material as well...

    Cotinus is supposed to be a good plant for drought areas, but even the seedlings are tolerant of quite a bit of abuse, unlike most things we try to grow!

    Glen in BC

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Zone 9a - Gulf Coast
    Posts
    9,934
    I have harvested many seeds from my purple smoke tree, and I have faithfully stored them in ziplocs in my refrigerator awaiting time to try them...

    Just out of curiosity, what is the ratio of 'green' seedlings as opposed to purple ones? And how soon can you tell which ones will end up green and which ones will produce the dark purple leaves?

    Thanks....
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Surrey, BC, Canada
    Posts
    221

    Green seedlings

    Ann--the green leaved seedlings are often obvious almost as soon as true leaves appear, but more need to be weeded out thru the summer, IMO.

    Reason is, there's a range of "purpleness", so some that seem purple begin to fade as summer progresses, much like red leaved jap. maples. I like to keep only the real persistent purple cotinus, which like I've mentioned is sometimes more striking than the named variety in circulation.

    I really suspect that some seedlings have gotten into the propagating stock and what's called Royal Purple is a muddy mixture of the real thing and various other lines that have snuck in from seedlings. The seedlings should be sold as Cotinus coggyria atropurpurea, again just like the jap. maples...atropurpureum not "Bloodgood", etc.

    Up here, apparently Bloodgood maples are similarly mixed up with various seedling maples, too bad.

    I think I weeded out about half, maybe more coz I was being real fussy. Some seedlings this time of year have a noticeable green undertone, while mine are all deep purple still. I do think these seedlings are just as good as named variety cuttings, but are a tougher plant with their vigorous seedling roots...just my observations so far.

    Glen in BC

+ Reply to Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts