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Thread: Hybridizing Daylilies....

  1. #16
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    Thanks Rebecca. I figured as much but I wanted to tryanyway. I don't know the name but that sounds good anyway. Maybe it will be unusual enough to sell well.
    tennessee sue

  2. #17
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    An old one....

    This one came from my sister's ranch in Texas. I don't know the name or anything about it except that it has double blossoms. Perhaps someone can tell me. These always go dormant, and daffodils spring up and bloom in the same bed before they start showing new growth.

    This and some yellow ones, also from the ranch were my very first daylilies.



    Then I found a "baker's dozen" hybridized lilies, bareroot at Walmart. And from then on, I was hooked....

    I tried planting the seeds when they were fresh despite having seen on TV that they are normally stored and stratified. I have been told by one daylily expert that this might not work for some varieties.

    I certainly have a lot to learn about them if I am going to try my hand at hybridizing them, don't I?
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  3. #18
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    Ann,

    First of all, that double sure looks a lot like H. fluva var. 'Flore Pleno'. It originated in China and was first introduced in the early 1800's. It is one of only two naturally occuring double flowered daylilies. FP is the 'well mannered' one of the two. It tends to stay more in a clump, isn't quite as tall and has the hose in hose form. The other is H.f.'Kwanso', of which I have many and all are beginning to wander a bit too far from where they are planted!

    You might try breeding your FP with that lovely yellow you showed in a previous post; it was the last image shown. Might get some interesting offspring from it, although probably not until the second generation.

    Daylily seed can be direct sown as soon as they are harvested. Just barely cover the seeds, and lightly water them in - I reccommend using a fine mist to do this. Some may sprout within a week, yet others will wait until spring. Dried seed must be stored in the fridge and then soaked, to rehydrate them before they will sprout, generally. Some seed given to me this past fall actually sprouted while in the fridge. I might add, it is not necessary to dry daylily seeds for more than a day before you store them, in air tight containers, in the fridge.

    Little by little, inch by inch, you'll learn what you need to know to help your daylilies to really grow!


    Rebecca
    Attached Images  

  4. #19
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    Thanks, Rebecca!

    I do like that yellow one. It is by far the prettiest yellow one that I have. I really don't know if it is named or was just amongst that bag of hybridized ones. I suspect that it is unamed, since it is amongst the ones I planted to adorn the fence that is near a young pecan tree that is rapidly started to create more and more shade.

    I shall give that a try, but I must tell you that I am not a morning person, and you have to get up mighty early to keep the bees from pollinated before you do. Guess I'll have to get some of that cheese cloth out of the drawer, huh?

    Thanks, again!
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  5. #20
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    Ann,

    I've dabbed pollen throughout the day and been successful. Mid morning works really well for me, cause I am NOT a morning person either!


    Rebecca

  6. #21
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    It's definitely a special time when I can take a break during my day and dabble at hand pollinated...

    Numerous vaqrieties have already started forming seeds. They will most likely be ready in a month or so to harvest.

    I took some pictures of a few more, just for the fun of it.... Like I said, I don't have any expensive named varieties, but this is the time of the year that I certainly enjoy what I have.

    I call this one pink cream ruffles. I know it is named, but lost the tag some time ago... Currently, it is in need of dividing. The blooms are medium sized, but very elegant. There is now a 3'X3' patch of these, and there are many more ready to bloom.



    These are about the smallest blooms that I have seen on a daylily, but quite cute!



    This is the yellow one from the ranch in Texas. The cluster of these has grown huge, and I have a second cluster that also needs to be divided. I have no idea what the name is, but they bloom profusely, and tend to form a lot of seed.

    These and the doubled ones are the ones that got me hooked. They are such easy to care for plants.



    It's no telling how old these were, since the original ranch house was built in the 1800's. I could find no record or when they were planted. They are in bright sun in this picture, and I wish that I had taken a picture a couple of days ago. There were twice as many blooms.




    These are the ones I call Pixie. They are named, and one day, I will look up the name....



    It seems like forever to wait for the seedlings of these to bloom, but in my busy world, somehow it will seem like tomorrow...

    Just some pictures from here and there in my yard...
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  7. #22

    Gotta question...

    Okay, you hybridizing bunch,
    I have always just hand pollinated just one flower on a plant when I was trying to cross pollinate something. If you hand pollinated different blooms on the same plant, with pollen from several different parents, will the seeds from each of those blooms be true offspring from the parent plant? I am wondering if the pollen from the different parent does anything at all to the rest of the blooms seed.
    Am I making any sense at all?..lol.
    And can you cross pollinate a evergreen daylily with a deciduous one and get anything?
    I've never tried to cross pollinate for traits other than color before.
    Thanks!
    becki
    Becki B.
    Central Ohio
    Zone 5b-6

  8. #23
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    Hybridizing 101


    Becki,

    Each flower that you pollinate will carry 50% of the genetic information from each of the two parents used on that particular cross.

    For instance; Plant 'A' has three open blooms
    On the first bloom, we'll call this 'A-1' you put pollen from plant 'X', the resultant offspring would be 'A-1 ' x 'x'.
    On the second bloom, you use pollen from plant 'Y', and those offspring would be 'A-2' x 'Y'.
    On the third bloom, you use pollen from plant 'Z', and those offspring would be 'A-3" x 'Z'.

    While all three will carry 50% of thire genetic information from plant 'A', they will only carry 50% of the genetic information from the plant's pollen that was used to fertilize each individual flower.

    Think of it as a group of sisters who happen to be identical triplets who marry three very different men. The children will bear a resembelance to each other because there mother's are identical triplets, but they will also bear a resembelance to there own fathers.

    To answer your second question, can Evergreen and Dormants be bred together? Simply put, yes, they can. In fact, the norther hybridizers almost always cross Evergreens with Dormants to get more cold hardy plants with some of the characteristics from the Evergreen plant.

    Another thing I might add is that foliage type, Evergreen, Semi-evergreen and Dormant, have nothing to do with cold hardiness. There are many 'Evergreen' varieties that are very cold hardy, and there are mant 'Dormants' that will not perform well in southern gardens.

    Hope this has answered your questions without adding to your confussion!

    Rebecca
    Last edited by Rebecca; 05-28-2003 at 12:19 AM.

  9. #24
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    I LIKE this ONE!

    I used the pollen from this one to pollinate several kinds. I used the pollen from a darker burgandy/purple one with a deeper colored inner ring to pollinate this one.



    Sorry, but I only have a few fans of this one, and I think this is the first year that it is blooming so well...

    Which me luck that I get seed!
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  10. #25

    Thank you guys so much!

    Rebecca,
    Very well explained! Thank you, now I understand. I read somewhere on that Daylily site that you recommended to be something about paying attention to the "ploidy" that you were cross hybridizing. Does that mean you can't cross a Diploid with a Tetraploid? I am sure I am probably making it lots harder than it really is..lol.
    Ann, thank you for the pic of your beautiful baby! It's gorgeous!
    Becki
    Becki B.
    Central Ohio
    Zone 5b-6

  11. #26
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    Becki,

    That's exactly what that means! Dips and Tets won't cross, as a general rule. Once in a great while it will happen, but only because the Tetraploid carries 'unreduced gamates'. The resulting offspring would be Triploids and have 33 chromosones. 33 won't divide equally, and no, they can't split one chromosone in half! Triploids are always self infertile, but can be crossed with Tetraploids and it sometimes works, due to the unreduced gamates. Which is how I was able to get viable seed when I crossed Chicago Sunrise with the specie varient 'Kwanso'. CS is a Tet., 'Kwanso' is a Triploid! I was very fortunate in getting 7 seeds from that cross and even more so that all of them sprouted and have been growing into nice, big, healthy seedlings. Usually you wouldn't get that many and then most won't germinate.

    Stick with Dip x Dip and Tet x Tet, you'll find it a lot more rewarding! One problem you run into with some Tets is taht they have fertility problems, not all Tets though, just some. Some are only fertile one way, either as pod parents or as pollen parents. Tinker's Garden has a Fertility Database you can use to check the fertility of any Tets, or Dips for that matter, that you are thinking about hybridizing with.

    Tinker's Garden

    (Hope I did that right!)

    He aslo has a Daylily database that is helpfull for checking the various 'stats' ofor a DL, often including parentage and photos. It's a very good resource for anyone interesting in dabbing pollen! I highly recommend it!

    Hope that helps!

    Rebecca

  12. #27

    YOU are a WEALTH of information!

    Rebecca,
    I have GOT to come meet you one of these days and see all your Daylily babies..lol. You have so much info to share! And you explain it all so well! Thank you!
    I tried the link you provided and it doesn't work..
    I'll try doing a search for it.
    Thanks again!
    Becki
    Becki B.
    Central Ohio
    Zone 5b-6

  13. #28
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    TINKER'S GARDEN DAYLILY PAGES


    Sorry about that, let's try a different link. This one should take you to the Daylily Pages Home Page and give you access to the Daylily Database and the Fertulity Database.
    TINKER'S DAYLILY PAGES

    I copied and pasted that right from my address bar, so it should work!

    Speaking of work, that's were I need to be headed out to - now!

    Until this evening, Happy Gardening!


    Rebecca




    'Stella D'Oro'

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