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Thread: STOP! Don't throw away those Daylily Scapes--there are babies in there!

  1. #31

    Little Buds

    Janene,

    If the scape is healthy, I'd hold off on planting them just yet. However, if the scape is deteriorating, you'll need to cut away the deteriorating part and try to save the bud by whatever means possible.

    I would also make sure that they are not exposed to excessive heat. In two controlled groups, my slow growers responded better at every stage of development on a bright window sill (no direct sun) in an air-conditioned environment.

    When I try the next group, I want to experiment with GSE or another anti-microbial to reduce the bacteria level and hopefully allow less intensive attention to the developing buds and plantlets.

    Shari

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    2

    Cool

    Shari,

    You have me looking at every lily I see. Even along the road. I was sitting at a stop sign today at lunch. And right beside the car was a patch of lilies. I could see the babies from my car!

    I wanted to jump out and grab a few, but knew it would not be kind to the gardener.

    I cannot believe they jump out at you once you know to look.

    Again, I am amazed!

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Newville, Alabama
    Posts
    35

    my prolific scape

    This is an update of the earlier scape I posted. Does the weight of the thing eventually pull it to the ground where it roots? I've got four (of about ten) that made it through the budding process. Any recommendations on this one or just continue to leave it as is?

    Also, Shari, do you use the GSE for any other plant applications? I love the stuff for medicinal use.
    Attached Images  

  4. #34

    Prolifs

    If the scape survives long enough, the prolif will form roots right where it is, especially if it gets abundant moisture from sprinklers or frequent rains. (However, too much water can cause nasty crown rot to the mother plant when the soil is high in humus material.)

    I prefer to let mama daylily care for her offspring as long as she is willing to do so. When the scape begins to die back (usually when the seedpod is gone), I cut it back to the top of the prolif. If the scape continiues to turn yellow beneath the prolif, I usually rescue the prolif and plant it next to it's mama (if it is large enough and has some roots). After planting, I keep it moist and shaded until the roots are established.

    If the weather is unusually hot and dry, or if it the prolif hasn't developed roots when it's taken from the scape, I plant it in a pot and place it in a shaded spot.

    I've begun using GSE with all plants as a seed wash (soak) prior to attempting to germinate them; and also as a soak for all cuttings before dusting with rooting hormone and sticking them down. I'm also experimenting with some other plant related applications.

    Shari

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Zone 9a - Gulf Coast
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    Daylily Stages of Tissue Culture

    Hi!

    I found this site while browsing the web today, and I think it would be of interest to see pictures and read about the different stages of tissue culture for daylilies. It's quite an informative page with lots of pictures and brief explanations of the process.

    Click on the link below:

    Daylily Tissue Culture

    Enjoy!
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  6. #36
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    8A East Texas
    Posts
    44

    Iris Scapes?

    Is it possible to make "babies" from iris scapes or is this technique just limited to daylilies? I've started some daylily scapes in a baggie with soil about 3-4 weeks ago..this was a very inspiring post for me. Thanks to all!

  7. #37
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Zone 9a - Gulf Coast
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    Iris Scapes

    Bobbie,

    I have researched the idea of propagating iris scapes, but I have been unable to find any information on the subject.

    That does not mean that it is not possible. It just means that it is not the propagation method that is normally used for iris. It certainly sounds like an idea worth trying, though. It's always fun to try new methods.

    Let us know what happens if you do!
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  8. #38
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Central Indiana Zone 5a
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    I have read this string with great interest and I thank you for beginning it! What marvolus information! However, I have had several of my daylilies produce proliferations on scapes that DID NOT carry a seed pod. I would have to say, therefore, that the presence of the seed pod is not necessarily a sign that a proliferation is possible! I gathered a dozen or more prolifs off of the daylily plants at a local discount chain, none had seed pods and some plants produced prolifs on more than one scape! Nealy all of these plants were the same cross. Next year I will begin my search sooner! (First there has to be something other than Stella D'Oro and Happy Returns!)

    There are a couple of public display plants I am ging to have to check out! I've been watching the for open pollinated seed pods to develope, but now I must take a closer look and see if any prolifs or even possibilities of prolifs are there.

    You've started something that I see no end to! Thank you!

  9. #39
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Rimouski QC, Canada
    Posts
    1

    Photo site

    Shari. that French site matter of fact is in Quebec not in France and as you can see very well done. And buy the way thanks, to you and your Grandfather

    Oceanics

  10. #40
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    1

    Question scapes

    I'm so very new to "scapes"...so bare with me please. Am I to understand you put them into bags with water? Were they totally submerged? .....and when you planted them in soil...how much of the ??stem ?branch?? was planted?
    Be good to Mother Nature, remember, she was here first!

  11. #41
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Chester, Texas - very small country town
    Posts
    30

    Thumbs up Daylilies-oh wow --

    Hi everyone -

    I have read all of the old entries that you all have made concerning DAYLILIES - and just really enjoyed all the terms and locations to see the different ones -

    All I have right now or about 8 (ditch lilies) orange with black spots - but when they die I have not found anything on them to carry babies - the whole stalk turns brown and dried looking and then nothing is left - till they come back next year -- but will start looking before they turn brown and maybe I will be able to have more of these gorgeous plants -

    Anyway just wanted to say - thanks for all the great information -
    goldeneagle = Beth S.

  12. #42
    ldymacearle,

    In Daylily language “scape” equals bloom stalk. Under the right conditions (high humidity is one factor), Daylilies will produce new plants along the scape at the leaf bracts, and sometimes at the very top of the scape among the top flower buds. These small plants are called proliferations. If a proliferation survives it will be an exact clone of the parent plant.

    This experiment was begun in June of this year shortly after our peak bloom season here in Coastal South Carolina. The purpose of the experiment was to see if spent scapes (bloomed out and being aborted by the parent plant) contained dormant proliferation buds at the leaf bracts that could be reinvigorated and coaxed to grow.

    This is by no means the easiest way to propagate daylilies, but it can be done. The project required daily attention and absolutely sanitary conditions (sterile is even better). Much like tissue culture, bacteria and mold can quickly cause death of the plantlets. The challenge is to maintain the growth of the plantlet until it is large enough to produce the small bulbous base from which the roots will grow.

    To answer your questions: For the first five days the scapes were soaked in a container of water, changing it daily. Our water here has a very high chlorine content. Even so, when I try the experiment again (if time permits several weeks from now) I will be using an anti-microbial and a more controlled environment.

    If the proliferation is growing outdoors on the live, healthy scape and the mother plant is supporting it, just leave it on the scape until it has roots and can grow independently. Nothing needs to be done until it is time to remove and plant it.

    The following link will take you to another forum discussion where some of the participants also attempted the experiment. Some were successful--many were not. If you read both of these threads completely, you will get step by step instructions for the project as well ongoing progress reports and much feedback. There is also much discussion of how to handle natural proliferations and all aspects of growing Daylilies.
    Garden Web Daylily Forum

    Happy Gardening!

    Shari

  13. #43
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Chester, Texas - very small country town
    Posts
    30

    Smile Daylillies -

    Shari - Just wanted to say THANK YOU - for all the information - and next year when my lilys come back I will most definitly be on the lookout for the scapes and working on the new babes - and the other forum site it was also very interesting -

    Take Care -
    goldeneagle = Beth S.

  14. #44
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Wichita,Kansas
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    Daylily Scapes, Eyes, Babies(Shari of SC)

    I have kept this post from Shari in SC in mind for almost a year now as it was too late last year to pursue this. My Daylilies are gearing up and I want to be ready this time. I notice that Shari's pictures are no longer linked. I do know what a scape is, can't say I've dissected one, but would like to know where these 'eyes' are and how you'll know them when you see them. How do you keep from damaging them if they are inside the scape ? Hope Shari is still out there with the pix.
    Thanks,Cathy

  15. #45
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Central Indiana Zone 5a
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    Cathy,

    I tried this last year but without any success! However, I also was able to collect 'natural' proliferations from a few of my own plants as well as some from bloomed out plants at work and they did great, for the most part.

    One that hasn't doesn’t so well is a prolif from 'Joylene Nichol'. I ended up having to dig it up and put it into a pot; it seems to be doing better now. I got 7 big prolifs form those work plants. I think I lost one and almost lost another. Five are in the seedling bed and four of them are putting up scapes! Which sorta blows 'it takes two years of growing before they will flower' theory! Only real problem with them is I don't remember what the flowers looked like, if they are all the same or if some are different cultivars. They were all from a group labeled as 'Premium Picotee' and were stated as being a group of the nicest, most recent 'hybridizer plants' available on the market. Well it won't be long before I know!

    Also, one of the statements Sheri made about the scape having to be carrying a pod before the buds would develop isn't necessarily so as all the prolifs I harvested last year came from plants that were not carrying pods. In fact those that were carrying pods didn't have prolifs at all! Of course climate might have something to do with is as well.

    All in all, I don't force prolif production on scapes, I just let Nature take her course and harvest what she provides me with. Works much better for me and it's a lot less work!


    Rebecca

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