+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 5
FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 LastLast
Results 16 to 30 of 65

Thread: STOP! Don't throw away those Daylily Scapes--there are babies in there!

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Newville, Alabama
    Posts
    35

    Good Stuff Shari!

    I had to read your original post a couple of times to be sure I understood. The photos were a BIG help . . .

    My mom said that explains why a bush hog can mow them down in full bloom and the plants will reappear down or on the other side of the road. She had always wondered about that

    Guess I know what I'll be doing this afternoon . . .

    Ros

  2. #17

    A little more to it

    Of course there's a little more to it---I thought you people would never ask!!

    I've just posted the following answer to a question on another board. Since I also posted my "discovery" there we've been chatting about this for several days.

    The question was:
    And there was absolutely nothing there when you started them??

    My Answer:
    Smooth, mature but dying scapes.
    There was the appearance of a speck of latent bud at the bract.
    Day four-- you should be seeing some bud action there.
    By day 5 here, there were obvious little plantlets pushing through and I took them out of the water bath.
    I put them into zipper top plastic bags, sprayed each with a diluted solution of root & bloom booster and blew up the bag to give them some CO2. --- And waited impatiently.

    I opened the bag daily because I was curious; but also sprayed to keep them moist and replaced the air (?breath of life perhaps?).


    Bob, I'm not sure if it will work with "ditch lilies". I don't know that I've ever seen a proliferation on one. They multiply so fast anyway that all you have to do is dig up a shovel full of them and plant them anywhere. They'll grow and multiply; then if you give some away they sneak back home at night.

    I'm very sure that the scapes have to be somewhat green for the for the latent bud to still have life.

    Basically its the fancy, named, e-x-p-e-n-s-i-v-e ones that everyone wants more of. I just coaxed some buds out of a latent state and encouraged them to grow.

    Happy Gardening,
    Shari

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Newville, Alabama
    Posts
    35

    guess what I found . . .

    I've got some "ditch lily" equivalents in my garden. One bract near the bottom of a scape had a 1" baby growing out of it. I tired to get a photo, but alas, the batteries in my camera were quite dead. It was quite a discovery.

    Glad you wrote that last post Shari - I'm taking that one out of the water and putting it in a bag.

    Another question . . . at what point do you plant them?

    Ros

  4. #19

    When to plant them

    Ros,
    I would plant them just as soon as the plantlet appears to be sturdy enough. It probably should be out of the bud stage and have visible leaflets. It is important not to wait until the stem deteriorates and begins to decay or the plant will die.

    Be sure to use only damp, sterile potting mix or vermiculite. You will need to first apply a rooting hormone to the base of the plantlet where the roots will be growing. Either the powdered type or the dip type will work. After applying the rooting hormone gently push the plantlet into the soil.

    Once planted, keep it damp but not wet just as you would any seedling. Do not let it dry out.

    I'm sure there are other methods that will work as well or better. Just use your instincts and what you know about plant development and survival and go for it.

    Shari

  5. #20

    What medium, what method?

    The following question was just asked on the other board.

    "......Is it absolutely necessary to cover these scapes entirely with water?" --

    My Answer:
    I do not know the answer to that question. The deductive logic I used in my experiment was as follows:

    Like humans and all other life forms, plants produce chemicals (we might call them hormones) that control life, growth, reproduction, etc. We know that some daylilies have the ability to reproduce themselves in various ways i.e. seeds, root divisions, and oddly enough by proliferations.

    I have observed that the reproductive cycle with daylilies occurs in a very orderly fashion. First the maturity of the plant, then the bloom, then the seed, then the proliferation and finally the root division.

    When the seed pod is gone, the plant seems to stop sending chemical messages to the scape and the scape dies. I am assuming that when I retrieved the mature but dying scapes, I caught them while they still contained some of the "make-a-proliferation" chemical.

    As a result, I was able to maintain the section of scape long enough for the bud to develop. The timing seems to me to be essential.

    As for which medium and which method to use, try several ways...If we all continue to experiment, who knows what great and interesting discoveries we will make.

    Good Luck!
    Shari

  6. #21

    See how they grow

    I didn't have the heart to put these last little ones out into the cruel world of bugs and critters yet.

    Shari

    June29
    Attached Images  

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Zone 9a - Gulf Coast
    Posts
    9,934

    Thumbs up How Wonderful!

    Thanks, Shari!

    This is so much fun...

    I am trying your method now, and your picture reminds me that I'd better go take a look at them!

    Keep up the GOOD WORK!


    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  8. #23
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Tuscaloosa, AL
    Posts
    39

    Talking

    Thankyou Shari

    I have just went crazy over daylilies. I started my collection last year and now have over 130 varieties. I just read your post , and I am so so excited..I will be up early in the morning to check my scrapes to see what I might salvage, most have already bloomed. I have been hybridizing also this year and have several seed pods , but I did notice that several plants did not(and I remember pollinating those). Now I may have a new way to grow daylilies

    thanks so much
    steve

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Newville, Alabama
    Posts
    35

    Shari, I couldn't resist

    The photo is not the greatest, but I thought you'd get a kick out of my "find" while cutting scapes:
    Attached Images  

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Zone 9a - Gulf Coast
    Posts
    9,934

    Another Plant with Proliferations - Lilium / Tiger Lily

    Lilium are another type of plant that has what is known as a proliferation. The proliferations in the leaf axils of liliums are called bubils.

    For more information on Lilium propagation and bulbils refer to the following thread (click on the underlined words):

    Lilium and/or Tiger Lily Propagation

    I would like to invite the guest of Landscape Propagation to browse the Landspro Message Board topics. You do not have to be a member to view the posts or search the board for specific information.

    Should you decide to join, you can subscribe to any thread on this forum by clicking on 'Recieve Updates to this thread' located at the bottom of each thread. By subscribing to a post, you will receive email notification when the thread is updated. As a member, you can also post replies to the thread.

    Note: When you are finished with any link on the forum, be sure to close your browser window to return to this forum.

    Welcome to Landspro, and I hope you enjoy your visit with us!
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  11. #26
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Halls, TN
    Posts
    2

    Daylily Babies

    Shari, I am having so much fun making daylily babies. Thanks so much for your information. I do have several questions and would appreciate you e-mailing me. I just registered for the landspro forum and have sooo much to learn.
    Janene Tidwell
    Janene Tidwell

  12. #27
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    2

    Thumbs up

    Shari,

    My 16 year old daughter is going to absolutely love this. She loves lilies and just wait until she hears this wonderful way to make babies! This may just be the thing to encourage her to get involved in the garden.

    I have a few lilies that I planted last year. They have multiplied some this year. The first wave of blooms are about done, so it is just in time.

    What a wonderful find. I thank you and your grandpa too!

  13. #28

    New posting

    I have just made the following post to the daylily forum and thought it might be of interest to some folks here as well:

    "Thank you all for your contributions and input into this project. Many of us have learned much about proliferations as a method of increasing daylilies.

    Lisa generously shares her photos and experiences as they occur.

    Mia shared her knowledge of chemical growth stimulants and gave us great information on producing more proliferations on each scape.

    Judy Ann shared her secret of using clay pots to protect baby plants once they’re in the garden; and also her discovery of thriving buds that were tossed into shaded, damp spot in the garden while she was unable to attend them.

    Crystal shared information of her safe, broad spectrum ant microbial (GSE) so that we can eliminate the bacteria factor.

    Laurie in Texas shared her observance of proliferations on hostas and a possibility that this method might work with them as well.

    Numerous others offer method tips, encouragement and interest as the saga continues to unfold.

    Again, thank you for all the wonderful input.

    I’ve had many of questions regarding when to plant the buds.

    I planted each one either when it seemed mature enough to survive without the scape; or when the scape seriously deteriorated and the plantlet would have died.

    Before I planted them, I cut away the remaining scape and coated the base of the plantlet with powdered rooting hormone. I'm sure the liquid "dip" type would also work.
    After planting it is important to keep it in a cool, humid environment until the roots develop and the plant can sustain itself.

    Some of the buds didn't survive after they were planted.

    Some factors that will negatively affect the survival:
    * Scapes submersed in water too long
    * Too much heat
    * Bacteria
    * Lack of humidity

    Of the 43 original buds generated in this experiment, 28 still survive many of which are thriving.

    Shari

  14. #29
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Zone 9a - Gulf Coast
    Posts
    9,934

    Daylily Flower Bed Design

    Shari and All,

    I have started a new topic on flower bed design. The first post contains pictures of a new and unique daylily flower bed at our local botanical gardens that I thought would be of interest to you.

    You can view this thread by clicking on the following link:

    Flower Bed Design

    Feel free to browse, and if you are a member of Landspro, we are looking forward to hearing about your thoughts and ideas.

    Enjoy!
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  15. #30
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Halls, TN
    Posts
    2

    Daylily Babies

    Shari, I have a queston--as usual. OK, I have kept the scapes in the water and now 3 days in the zip lock bag. Several of the babies were ready to plant and I did that. What do I do with the babies that look like small English Peas? Keep them in the bag or put them back in water or plant?
    One of the large babies I planted started turning yellow so I took it out of the dirt and put it back in water.By the way,when I planted my babies I left about an inch of the scape on top and a very small portion on the bottom. This is the way I have always done flips when I rooted them.Of course, the flips had roots. I think the baby may still get some nourishment from the scape. They have been nice and green. Please let me know what you think about the English Peas?
    Janene
    Janene Tidwell

+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 5
FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts