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Thread: STOP! Don't throw away those Daylily Scapes--there are babies in there!

  1. #1

    Lightbulb STOP! Don't throw away those Daylily Scapes--there are babies in there!

    I have made the most interesting discovery this week and I'm so excited that I just have to share it. Now, if you don't like daylilies and care even less about how to get more baby ones; then just traipse on over to another thread 'cause this one is not for you. However if you love daylilies, especially very unusual and pretty ones; and want to increase their population more easily than ever before, you're in the right place. Pull up a chair, get yourself a glass of lemonade and stay for awhile. I'm going to talk about daylilies and I guarantee this will be interesting.

    Did you ever notice that some of the prettiest daylilies are often the ones that multiply poorly. Well, this is true of my garden anyway. The common, naturalized orange ones are everywhere. Folks around here unlovingly refer to them as
    "ditch lilies" because they multiply like weeds and are seen along roadsides everywhere. They defy all garden pests and lawn mowers. Throw them into the compost pile and they happily take up residence there. However the pretty ones, though easy to grow, are usually not as promiscuous as their wild sisters.

    Daylilies are most often propagated by seeds , division of the clumps , and proliferations. Since seedlings are usually not exact replicas of the mother plant, and divisions disrupt blooms and clump appearance; the method I prefer is proliferations.
    When I first began growing fancy daylilies, I noticed these little plantlets attached to the scapes usually grew only when accompanied by a seedpod. It seemed that the presence of a seedpod caused the mother plant to maintain the scape long enough for the proliferation to develop. Scapes without seedpods quickly withered and turned brown after the last bloom folded. Hmmm--no rocket science is needed here to realize that if I want proliferations I need those seedpods---even if I have to run around garden every morning making buzzing bee noises as I dutifully apply pollen to pistils.

    *When propagating any plant be sure that it is not a variety protected by a plant patent.

    And now on to my discovery---
    The early-season, fancy daylilies have finished their first wave of blooms, set seedpods and are beginning to send up new fans from which the second wave of blooms will come. That means clean-up and maintenance time. I removed all dead and bad looking foliage and scapes, checked for insects and disease, generously fed each clump with liquid fertilizer, then loaded all the debris into the compost bin.

    As I moved on to the next task, I was still thinking of those dying daylily scapes with no seedpods and no proliferations. There were more than usual this year. I recalled the normal pithy inside of the scapes and it reminded me of the sugar cane I "helped" my grandfather plant as a child. He'd always point out the "eye's" at each joint and say "There's babies in there just waitin' to grow." --------- What if ?????? ------------

    I rushed to the compost bin, quickly retrieved those pitiful scapes and looked at them a little closer. Sure enough -- "eye's".
    I cut all of those scapes into sections, so that each one had an "eye" in the middle leaving as much of the scape as possible on each end. Plants must have light and water to grow, so I put the sections in a clear plastic container large enough for them to lay sideways, and covered them with water. Next I put the container full of soaking scape sections in window that gets very bright light but no direct sun rays. After 24 hours, I changed the water and pulled away the loose material from the scapes. The "eye's" were swelling. The following day I changed the water again--the eye's had now become little green buds.

    It is now day five. The 43 the buds are about an inch long and growing daily. There were babies in there just waiting to grow.

    Thanks for the daylilies Granddad.

    Shari
    Last edited by Shari of SC; 06-21-2002 at 05:29 PM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Tex .. near Dallas
    Posts
    280

    scape or scrapes

    Ok Shari .. I am a lover of daylilies and have quiet a few .. but have no idea what are scapes .... know what the seed pod is .. and harvest seeds but need a little help on the term "scapes". I also don't worry a lot about names ..so won't be able to identify what I have. Have a few ditch lilies but also a lot of different ones ... some rebloomers and some doubles (maybe that is what they are called ... looks like two flowers on top of each other)

    Next to old roses .. these are our favorites ....

    So many plants .. so little room ....

    Jim

  3. #3
    Jim the underlined words are hyperlinks---click on it and you will see. Surprise!

    Shari

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Louisiana, between BR and NO
    Posts
    61

    It's an epidemic!!!

    Shari,

    I have scapes too!! I walked outside and found what you wrote about. Thank you!!! Thank you!!! Thank you!!!

    I'll be making more day lillies for next year. Thanks again,
    Ray in South Louisiana

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Kirbyville,Texas
    Posts
    156
    I have scapes also but mine aren't green there deader the a doornail do you think theres enough juice in there to wake up the babys
    Gene

  6. #6

    Dead looking scapes

    Now you know to set seedpods.

    However; it may not be to late. Pull off the scape with a quick jerk all the way down at the base of the plant. You just may be surprised to find a little green and an eye left near the bottom. It is worth a try. They are quite dead looking any way and need to come off, right? So why not give it a try. I hope you will be pleasantly surprised.

    I had one lady tell me that she went out to the garden center and bought a bloomed out one (at a discount no less) with scapes left on it so that she could try this.

    Shari

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Kirbyville,Texas
    Posts
    156
    Shari
    I have never cleaned out the scapes I just let them be I guess they eventaully just fall off and than I'll mow them up .I have them planted ibn the back to keep the soil from washing down hill. But will give it a try just to see for myself. Who knows I might start collecting daylillys
    Gene

  8. #8

    Daylily Cultivars

    Gene,
    Click on the link on my post at the beginning of this thread (where it says:-- very unusual and pretty ones; ) It takes you to a french website that displays over 8,000 pictures of very ornate and and colorful named daylily cultivars indexed from A-Z. The words are French, (of which I speak very little) but the pictures are gorgeous.

    Those are definitely not "ditch-lilies".

    Shari

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Kirbyville,Texas
    Posts
    156
    Very nice web site Shari I didn't know there was so many different lillys out there
    Gene

  10. #10

    Baby Pictures

    Excuse the quality--I'm learning to use this camera but thought you'd like to see them before I plant this last group.

    Shari

    Last edited by Shari of SC; 06-25-2002 at 01:43 PM.

  11. #11

    First Picture

    Day 10
    Attached Images  

  12. #12

    Different View

    Day 10 as well
    Attached Images  

  13. #13

    Last View Same Scape Pieces

    Still day 10
    Notice that section 1 and 4 have multiple bud growths, and section 2 has a root just beginning to protrude at the base of the bud.

    Now they get planted with their siblings.
    Attached Images  
    Last edited by Shari of SC; 06-25-2002 at 01:48 PM.

  14. #14
    Hi All!! I hope it's O.K. to just jump in!

    Thanks Shari!! Good to know what to be looking for!!

    LISA

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Zone 9a - Gulf Coast
    Posts
    9,934

    Smile Thanks!

    Hi, Lisa!

    It's wonderful to have you jump in....

    It's exciting to see so many visitors, and even more so when you join.

    Welcome to Landspro and thanks for becoming a member. We sincerely hope you will be jumping in a lot.
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


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